The Soldier in Later Medieval England

English Army Table

Surname First name Status in 1415 Biography Retinue description Total Troops References
Agarston John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Agarston indented to serve with four other esquires, Thomas Appulton, William Castellon, Thomas Mapurley and Thomas Corbet, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/447 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/287; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d;TNA E101/46/15;TNA E358/6 rot 10d
Agase John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Agase indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers , George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Akeland John archer under investigation In 1415, John Akeland indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Albertyn William archer under investigation In 1415, William Albertyn indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Albryrht Sanon Mail maker under investigation In 1415, Sanon Albryrht indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 12 TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 d
Alcock William yeoman of the household Possibly a stannary bailiff for Blackmore in Cornwall, as a William Alcok is mentioned in relation to a court case in 1420 (CPR 1416-1422, pp. 232). In 1415, William Alcock, yeoman/valettus, indented directly with the crown with Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere, Gregory Scalder, William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here indicates that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Alderwich Nicholas Esquire On 25 February 1401 Henry IV granted Nicholas Alderwich £40 per annum, confirmed on 7 November 1413. On 4 January 1406 Alderwich was described as a king’s esquire when and his wife Alice were granted a messuage called Ladehalle in the town of Moreton in Essex, together with another man, Richard Burgh, to hold to the value of £20 per annum. In 1415, Nicholas Alderwich indented to serve with another esquire, John Peryent with a third man-at-arms and 9 archers. Nicholas appears to have been one of those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given licence to return to England. By the time his account was enrolled he was described as deceased. The remainder of their retinue fought at and survived the battle and returned to England from Calais with 11 horses. 12 TNA C76/98 m. 22; TNA E101/69/3/374 (with John Peryent); TNA E404/31/332; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5; TNA E358/6 rot7
Alkemade Florence van Knight The name suggests he is Low Countries origin but to date, a full biography has not been possible. In 1415, Florence Van Alkemade indented to serve with four men-at-arms and 15 archers. It seems all were at the battle. 20 TNA E101/69/5/434; TNA E404/31/215; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Allerton Robert Clerk of the royal household under investigation In 1415, Robert Allerton indented to serve with four other clerks of the royal household, Thomas Bridde, Randolph Appulton, William Pek and Richard Reston. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/338 (with 4 others)
Anderton Thurstan Esquire under investigation In 1415, Thurstan Anderton indented to serve with two other esquires, William Orell and Henry Pemberton, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/477 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/282; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2; TNA E101/46/17; TNA E358/6 rot. 1d
ap Henry John Esquire John ap Harry, as his name might suggest, was Welsh, by language, family and association but his estates, Poston, Turnastone and Oldcourt at Bacton in the Golden Valley were in the Welsh-speaking corner of south west Herefordshire. John was a lifelong servant of the house of Lancaster, and when first mentioned in the records in May 1390 he was preparing to go to Prussia in the household of Henry of Bolingbroke, earl of Derby. He became deputy steward of Bolingbroke’s lordship of Brecon by 1396 and it was probably about this time that he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Hugh Waterton (d. 1409), his patron’s chamberlain. In 1399, John was sheriff of Herefordshire and was entrusted by the victorious Henry IV to return Richard II’s jewels from Pembroke Castle and in October of the same year he was granted the constableship of Aberystwyth Castle for life. Like his cousin, Dafydd Gam (d. Agincourt, 1415) John remained loyal in the course of Glyndwr’s rebellion though his brothers, Thomas and Gruffudd did not though both repented quickly and survived. John was a stalwart of the defence of the English borders and was rewarded and it was a consistent Lancastrian servant, three-time MP for Herefordshire between 1406 and 1411who joined Henry V’s campaign in 1415. three years later, however, following the capture of the Lollard rebel, Sir John Oldcastle, a long-time associate of John ap Harry, it transpired that John had been collecting the rents of the traitor’s Herefordshire estates ever since 1414, presumably passing the proceeds to the fugitive. These rents should, of course, have reverted to the Crown on Oldcastle’s outlawry, but John ap Harry declared (hardly convincingly) that he was not aware of the forfeiture. This discovery ended his career in government office though he continued as steward if the earl of March’s lordship of Usk until John’s death before August 1421. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John ap Harry entered into an indenture to serve in France, with one man-at-arms and six archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA C76/98 m. 11; TNA E101/69/6/456
ap Henry Thomas Esquire Thomas ap Harry was the brother of John ap Harry (d. 1421) who had a long career in the service of the house of Lancaster. Thomas’s career, however, was less distinguished. With a third brother, Gruffudd, he had joined Glyndwr’s rebellion but abandoned it quickly, being pardoned by 4 January 1404. He held land at Talgarth, Brecon. In 1415, Thomas ap Harry entered into an indenture to serve in France with one other man-at-arms and six archers, but no further details are known of his retinue. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA C76/98 m. 13; TNA E101/69/4/376
Appulton Randolph Clerk of the royal household under investigation In 1415, Randolph Appulton indented to serve with four other clerks of the household, Thomas Bridde, William Pek, Robert Allerton and Richard Reston. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/338 (with 4 others)
Appulton Thomas Esquire Thomas Appulton received a 20 mark annuity from the king on 29 November 1416. In 1415, Thomas Appulton indented to serve with four other esquires, William Castellon, Thomas Mapurley, John Agarston and Thomas Corbet, each of which provide 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 20 TNA E101/69/6/447 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/287; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d;
Arondell John Chaplain under investigation In 1415, John Arondell indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Arundel Thomas Fitzalan, earl of earl Thomas (b. 1381), one of the peers closest to Henry V, was among those who suffered under Richard II – his father was executed in 1397 and Thomas eventually joined his uncle, Archbishop Arundel (d. 1414) in exile in France with Henry Bolingbroke. Returning with him in 1399, Thomas fought alongside the young prince in Wales in the following decade serving as lieutenant of North Wales. He led the troops which the prince sent to France in 1411 in support of John the Fearless, duke of Burgundy.In 1415, he was among those who fell ill at Harfleur, returning to England on 28 September where he died at Arundel castle on 13 October, his birthday. His tomb effigy, and that of his wife, survives in Arundel Church, Sussex. Arundel’s retinue consisted of 400 men – the earl himself, a knight banneret, 3 other knights, 95 men-at-arms and 300 archers. Of these, 2 men-at-arms and 13 archers died at Harfleur while the earl himself, 19 men-at-arms, 69 archers and 3 minstrels were invalided home from Harfleur on 28 Sept. We have direct evidence that the archers were replaced by Welshmen from the earl’s estates . Of his retinue, therefore, a banneret, 94 men-at-arms and 300 archers were present at Agincourt. One of his men at arms, William Wolf, captured a French prisoner there, ‘Sire Bursegando’, whom the king released at Calais. The name sounds like MArshal Boucicaut but since he was taken to England, it must be another individual, possibly Geffroi Le Maingre, seigneur de Breuildore . 400 TNA E 404/31/149; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; TNA E101/44/30 no 1 m 8; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/47/1; E 358/6; rot. 2
Arundel Richard Knight Of Worth Matravers (Dorset), Banstead and Walton on the Hill (Surrey), and Brandon in Wolston, (Warwickshire), Richard was one time sheriff of Hereforedshire and governor of Bamburgh and Rochester castle. On 17 February 17 1415 he was granted for life, as a king’s knight, 100 marks per annum for his good services to Henry IV and Henry V, replacing a grant to him of the alien priory of Wilmington in Sussex. he made his will on 8 July 1417, no doubt as he prepared to set sail for the invasionof Normandy. He died on 3 June 1419 and was buried in the Lady Chapel of Rochester Cathedral. In 1415, Richard Arundel indented to serve with nine men-at-arms and 30 archers. It seems all were at the battle. 40 TNA C 76/98 m. 14; TNA E101/69/5/414; TNA E404/31/261; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2; TNA E101/45/21, m. 26
Asco John Esquire John Asco is described as being from London but there is no further information available about him. In 1415, John Asco indented to serve with five other esquires, John Clement, Robert Helyon, William Burgoyne, Henry Lounde and Robert Asshefelde, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E404/31/291 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d; TNA E101/46/40; TNA E358/6 rot 7;
Asenhull William Esquire Born William Harpeden, he was possibly the valet of the chamber of Henry of Bolingbroke of that name who accompanied his master on expeditions to Prussia and the Holy Land in 1390 and 1392, and may be identified with the William Harpeden esquire who witnessed the will made by Henry’s father, John of Gaunt, on 3 Feb. 1398. There is no doubt, however, that he was the ‘King’s esquire’ to whom in September 1397 Richard II granted for life the late earl of Arundel’s grange at Tyburn, Middlesex, and who, in 1399 received a life annuity of £20. Like many others who had served both Bolingbroke and Richard, Harpenden was accepted into the former’s court as Henry IV and had his annuity renewed in January 1400. Between November 1406 and March 1413 he was an usher of the king’s hall and on account of his marriage to Joan Hasilden, widow of the one-time controller of John of Gaunt’s household, the King granted him and his wife an annuity of £40 for life from the issues duchy of Lancaster estates in Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire. The rise in Harpeden’s status as a consequence of his marriage match prompted him to change his name, and henceforth he was known as Asenhill. The scale of his estates in Cambridgeshire and his association with the royal court led William to represent the county in parliament seven times between 1406 and 1429 as well as being a justice of the peace and escheator – the officer responsible for controlling property in the king’s hands through confiscation in the same county. It is possible that William received his knighthood in the course of the 1415 campaign: he is a knight by the time the enrolled account TNA E358/6 was produced . In May 1416 Sir William undertook to spend three months at sea in the force sent to relieve the garrison at Harfleur. Having founded a perpetual chantry in the house of the Carmelite Friars at Cambridge with the intention that it should be his place of burial, in 1440 he obtained permission from Pope Eugenius IV to have his wife’s body exhumed from Guilden Morden parish church and re-interred in the friary which was demolished at the Reformation. He himself died shortly before 22 April 1443. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, William Assenhull indented to serve with a man-at-arms and 6 archers. His man man-at-arms and 1 of his archers fell ill at Harfleur and were given leave to return to England on 3 October though Assenhull, who had been knighted by the time he submitted his account to the exchequer, and the remainder of his archers fought at, and survived, the battle to return home from Calais with 13 horses. 8 TNA C76/98 m. 15; TNA E101/69/4/407; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d; TNA E404/31/369; TNA E101/46/39; TNA E358/6 rot 1 TNA E101/45/5 TNA E101/46/39
Assent Roger archer On 27 March 1415 Henry V granted Roger Assent the office of forester and rider of the forest and chase of Cannock in the county of Stafford along with the fees, wages and other commodities belonging to it. CPR 1413-16, p. 321 In 1415, Roger Assent indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 1d; 12; TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others);TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Asshefelde Robert Esquire under investigation In 1415, Robert Asshefelde indented to serve with five other esquires, John Clement, Robert Helyon, William Burgoyne, Henry Lounde and John Asco, with each man providing 3 archers. Robert’s name appears on one of the sick lists. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume the remainder were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/291 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 15.
Assheton John Knight As a young man Assheton became a retainer of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, at an annual fee of £20. Following the accession of Henry IV , he was given further grants and favours; this included the appointment to royal commissions and as a JP. He represented the county of Lancashire in three parliaments (1411, May 1413, March 1416). He served on the 1416 campaign, and played a sustantial role in the conquest of Normandy after 1417, being appointed to a number of offices and commands in Normandy including bailli of Cotentin . He died on 3 September 1428. He was related to another knight who indented for the 1415 campaign, Sir Ralph Staveley, who was his stepmother’s brother. see also www.historyofparliamentonline.org. In 1415, Sir John Assheton indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 12 TNA E404/31/217; TNA E101/45/5 m4d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 36; Ag Roll
Asshton Nicholas Esquire A man of this name was first elected to parliament for Liskeard in 1421 but as he was a lawyer he is unlikely to be the person serving here. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Nicholas Asshton indented to serve with 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E101/69/6/449
Atherton Nicholas Esquire Nicholas Artherton (probably the elder son of Sir Nicholas Atherton, MP for county of Lancashire 1401) came from gentry family with long service to the house of Lancaster. Nicholas took part in John of Gaunt’s expedition to Castile in 1385 and later became a regular part of the ducal household in the 1390s. After Henry IV ascended to the throne he was given the title of king’s esquire with an annuity of £10 in 1400 and received occasional grants of favour from the king. Nicholas and his father, Sir Nicholas, appear to have been quite violent men as indictments were taken out against them for various acts including robbery, although there connection to the king ensured that they avoided punishment. Sir Nicholas (the father) died in1420 with his son dying four years later. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Nicholas Atherton indented to serve with four other esquires, Henry Skerbrick, John Osbaldeston, Gilbert Barton and Thomas Rigmaiden, with each man providing 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/284 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Athurton William Esquire under investigation Section of indenture where size of retinue is stated is damaged and unreadable ? TNA E101/69/4/399
Atte Halle William archer/saddler under investigation In 1415, William atte Halle indented to serve with four other archers, all saddlers in the royal household, William Tikhill, John Preston, Thomas Sadeller and Richard Huden. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others)
Attilbrigge John Esquire On 22 May 1414 John Atillbrigg was described as a king’s servant when granted 100 marks, along with two other men, as a fine levied on the bishop of Chichester due to the escape from his prison of one William Fretton a clerk convicted of felony. He was described as deceased by 16 October 1415 which suggests that he may have died at the siege of Harfleur. In 1415, John Attilbrigge indented to serve with 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle but a source in England notes the death of a John Attilbrigge before 16 October. 4 TNA E101/69/6/448; TNA E404/31/307; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Babthorp Robert Esquire  Robert seems to have originated from the North Yorkshire village of the same name and was described as a king’s esquire by 1403. It is possible that he owed his preferment to an association with John Waterton of Waterton, Lincolnshire, whose brother Sir Hugh and cousin Robert were leading figures in Henry IV’s regime. Certainly, Babthorpe married John Waterton’s daughter and heir Eleanor, probably in 1409–10. After Eleanor’s death he took as his second wife Bridget Pilkington. On 4 November 1406 he was granted for life the stewardships of the duchy of Lancaster’s honour of Leicester in Leicestershire and Warwickshire, including Castle Donington and Kenilworth, and of the duchy’s lands in Northamptonshire, including Higham Ferrers. He was probably knighted in the course of the 1415 campaign: he certainly had been by March 1416. He remained with the king in France for much of the rest of the decade, and was active at the siege of Rouen in 1418–19. He was controller of the king’s household from 1416, and served as steward of the household from September 1421 to April 1424; by 1423 he was steward of Queen Catherine’s Leicestershire estates. He was named an executor and administrator of Henry V’s will. His brother William, a lawyer, was also promoted by Henry, becoming his attorney-general in 1419. On 1 March 1432 Babthorpe was reappointed as steward of Henry VI’s household, a post he held until the summer of 1433, when he was replaced by the earl of Suffolk. Babthorpe died in August 1436, and is said to have been buried in the church at Hemingbrough, North Yorkshire though no memorial to him survives there. His heir was his son Ralph, who was killed—together with his own son, another Ralph—fighting against the Yorkists at the first battle of St Albans in 1455. See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography In 1415, Robert Babthorp’s retinue consisted of himself, 4 men-at-arms and 15 archers. All fought at the battle. William Callowe, one of Babthorpe’s soldiers, and William Kempton, a man-at-arms of the retinue of Sir William Phelip, captured a prisoner called le Sire de Corps who was ransomed at £356.13.4. Another Frenchman was also captured by members of the retinue at the battle. 20 TNA C76/98 m. 11; TNA E404/31/336; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6; TNA E101/46/38; TNA E358/6 rot 1; Ag roll (as knight)
Bagot John Knight John Bagot was born around 1358 to a distinguished family of the county of Staffordshire. His first recorded military service occurred in 1386 on John of Gaunt’s expedition to Castile, following which he was retained by John of Gaunt at an annual fee of 40 marks. Under the LAncastrain kings he held various local offices, including the escheatorship of Staffordshire and was an MP. In June 1408, he indented to serve for a year as lieutenant of Calais to Sir Thomas Beaufort (earl of Dorset in 1415). His military service ended after the 1415 campaign but he continued to participate in royal commissions until his death in c. 1437. see also www.historyofparliamentonline.org. In 1415, John Bagot indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. He appears on the list of knights left to garrison Harfleur under the command of the earl of Dorset, so most likely did not fight at Agincourt. 12 TNA C 76/98 m. 19; TNA E404/31/318; TNA E101/45/5 m.5; TNA E101/45/20, m. 29
Bakers Piers Labourer under investigation In 1415, Piers Bakers indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye and William Herbelot. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Balderton William cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, William Balderton indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Ballard Gregory Esquire Gregory Ballard was given three separate annuities by Richard II between 1395 and 1396, which totalled £59 10s by May 1396; these were later confirmed by Henry IV on 1 November 1399 and Henry V on 12 June 1413. In January of the following year he was one of the commissioners for Kent tasked with investigating Lollards in the county who had participated in a failed rising against the king in the previous month. He was described as dead by January 1416, which may indicate that he died at some point during the Agincourt campaign, at which time he held lands in Northley and Westbury in Shropshire. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 66; CPR 1413-16, pp. 106, 178, 390, 404-405; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 367 In 1415, Gregory Ballard’s retinue consisted of himself and 3 archers. It seems unlikely that any of these men left Harfleur and it is possible that all may have died in the course of the siege. 4 TNA E101/69/5/417; TNA E404/31/426; TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 d; TNA E101/47/10; TNA E358/6 rot. 3d;
Balne William Clerk of the king’s kitchen under investigation In 1415, William Balne indented to serve with six other men, Stephen Payne, John Feriby, Thomas Morton, Walter Burton, John Langville and Robert Castel, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/5/412 (with 6 others); TNA E404/31/415 (with 6 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Bamebury John yeoman of the household On 19 November 1415 John Bamebury was described as being deceased, having previously served as yeoman harbourer of the household during his lifetime. This included the grant of the office of keeper of the castle and jail of Cambridge along with its fees, wages and other profits. CPR 1413-6, p. 369 In 1415, John Bamebury, valettus, indented directly with the crown with Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere, Gregory Scalder, William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers although a John Bamebury is described in an English source as dead by 19 November1415 which suggests he may have died on the campaign. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Banaster Roger Esquire under investigation In 1415, Roger Banaster indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/5/441; TNA E404/31/431; TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 d
Bangor William yeoman of the household William Bangor was one of the yeomen of the king’s kitchen, who received a grant of the manor of Nettlebed, Oxfordshire 7 October 1414. CPR 1413-1416, p. 251. In 1415, William Bangor indented to serve with Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille, Roger Semper, and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household.In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Bank John Esquire John Bank was given an annuity of £20 per annum by Richard II on 31 January 1398, which was confirmed by Henry IV on 2 November 1399 and Henry V on 1 May 1414. John Bank, a Yorkshireman, died before February 1418. His wife, Christina Percy was described as a widow at the time of her death, shortly before 10th February 1418. CPR 1413-6, pp. 190 In 1415, John Bank indented to serve with another esquire, Thomas Fowler and 4 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 6 TNA E404/31/323 (with Thomas Fowler); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5;
Barbour John archer under investigation In 1415, John Barbour indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye and Roger Assent. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Barton Gilbert Esquire under investigation In 1415, Gilbert Barton indented to serve with four other esquires, Henry Skerbrick, John Osbaldeston, Nicholas Atherton and Thomas Rigmaiden, with each man providing 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/284 (with 4 others)
Barton Olivier Esquire under investigation In 1415, Olivier Barton indented to serve with two other esquires, Randolph Barton and Hugh Mourton, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/460 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/269; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4
Barton Hugh yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, Hugh Barton indented to serve with eleven other valetti, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, William Hether, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford and Symon Swan. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, presumably fighting as archers. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Barton Randolph Esquire under investigation In 1415, Randolph Barton indented to serve with two other esquires, Olivier Barton and Hugh Mourton, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 9 TNA E101/69/6/460 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/269; TNA E101/45/5 m.4;
Base John archer under investigation In 1415, John Base indented to serve with seven other archers, Thomas Hervy, Thomas Ernysoy, Roger Martyn, Richard Hunt, John Compton, William Clerk and William Starky. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/305 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Baskerville John Knight Born around 1388, in February 1414 a commission was granted to look into his complaint that a Richard de la Beere with 100 armed men had caused damage to his lordship of Erdesley in the march of Wales in Herefordshire. In February 1421 he was given an annuity of 40 marks, being described as a king’s knight. He served on the expedition to France in that year with nine men-at-arms and 30 archers. his date of death has not yet been established, but he certianly did not die – as one website claims- in 1415. In 1415, John Baskerville indented to serve with one man-at-arms and six archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 8 TNA C 76/104 m. 18, TNA C 76/98 m. 21; TNA E101/69/7/481; TNA E404/31/274; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2; TNA E101/45/22, m. 16
Batronive Thomas Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, Thomas Batronive indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Batte William Carpenter under investigation In 1415, William Batte indented to serve with five other men, all described as carpenters of the hall, William Carpenter, John Westwode, John Wyke, John Bole and Thomas Kent. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/390 (with 5 others)
Batyn John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Batyn indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Beauchamp Walter Esquire Walter Beauchamp was a member of the family of Beauchamp of Powick, a cadet branch of the Beauchamps, earls of Warwick. He was an esquire of Henry IV’s household by 1400 and escorted the king’s daughter Blanche to her marriage in Heidelberg in 1402. He probably fought for the king at the battle of Shrewsbury in 1403. He gained influence in Wiltshire through his marriage to Elizabeth Roches. He was knighted by 25 November 1415 (and perhaps before or during the campaign) when he was described as a ‘king’s knight’ and granted custody of the manor of Somerford Keynes, Wiltshire during the minority of Richard, son of Richard earl of Cambridge (one of the Southampton Plotters). Oddly, he indented separately yet he also appears on the expeditionary muster roll of the duke of Gloucester. He continued to serve in the French wars but also became treasurer of the royal household/treasurer of war in 1421. he was appointed to the council of Henry VI in 1422. He died on 1 Jan 1430. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Walter Beauchamp’s retinue consisted of himself, 3 men-at-arms and 12 archers. At Harfleur, 6 ‘valetti’ and 2 ‘Garcon’ fell ill and were given leave to return to England. They seem not to have formed part of Beauchamp’s military retinue since his full complement was recorded as having served at the battle. 16 TNA C76/98 m. 15; TNA E101/69/3/373; TNA E404/31/324; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E358/6 rot. 1 d;
Beaumont Charles Knight Charles Beamond was Alfreriz of Navarre, and one of the English king’s important supporters in south west France. We have his muster made on the Heath of Southampton on 13 July 1415, indicating that he had come to England with his troops. He served on the 1416 campaign also with sixteen men-at-arms and 32 archers. In 1415, Charles Beaumond indented to serve with three men-at-arms and twelve archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 16 TNA C 76/98 m. 18; TNA E404/31/319; TNA E101/45/5 m.5d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 15; TNA E101/44/30 no. 2 m.1
Bekouyll William cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, William Bekouyll indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Bekuyffeld John yeoman of the poultry under investigation In 1415, John Bekuyffeld indented to serve with three other men, all described as yeomen of the king’s poultry, Norman Swynford, William Manfeld and John Ponde. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/366 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Belle John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Belle indented to serve with four other esquires, Thomas Burcestre, John Philip, Robert Quykkesley and John Holton, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary, we can assume they were at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/398 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/299; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Benet George cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, George Benet indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse 25 TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d; TNA E101/47/9;
Benet John Master mason John Benet was a Master Mason who had been engaged on work on royal properties for some time. For example, on 24 September 1414, he was ordered to ‘take stone lead, iron and other necessaries for work on the king’s manor of Sheen’ [Surrey, now London] (CPR Hen V vol. 1, p. 116), having been engaged in similar work since at least June of the same year (ibid. p. 222). On June 6 1415, he was commissioned, with Simon Lewys, to take 100 stonecutters in the city of London and the counties of Sussex, Surrey, Kent, Essex, Hertford, Buckingham and Middlesex and bring them to the said city, to be ready there with their instruments on 17 June next at latest to go on the king’s service beyond the seas. (ibid. p. 346). In 1415, John Benet indented to serve with three other master masons, John Benet, John Cliff, John Colchestre and William Not, as well as a further 96 other unnamed masons. Given the nature of their trade they may have remained at Harfleur after its surrender but seems that at least some served at the battle since Not appears in the Agincourt roll. 100 TNA E101/69/8/520 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Benge Hugh cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, Hugh Benge indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Bentham John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Bentham indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Benyfeld John esquire under investigation In 1415, John Benyfeld indented to serve with 7 other esquires, Griffin Percevale, William Smythson, John West, Roger Shermay, Thomas Berton, Nicholas Sanle and Matthew Bowre . In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/380 (with 7 others); TNA E404/31/320; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Berton Thomas esquire under investigation In 1415, Thomas Berton indented to serve with 7 other esquires, Griffin Percevale, William Smythson, John West, John Benyfeld, Roger Shermay, Nicholas Sanle and Matthew Bowre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/380 (with 7 others); TNA E404/31/320; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Beure Richard Cellarer under investigation In 1415, Richard Beaure indented to serve with three other men, described as ‘cellarers’, John Carbrok, John Hardyng and Edward Sadeler. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others)
Bigge Hugh yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, Hugh Bigge indented to serve with William Bangor, Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille, Roger Semper and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Birkyn John yeoman of the household John Birkin was described as a merchant of Kingston-upon-Hull in 1409, when he was involved in various court cases regarding the seizure of ships. Later the same year, on 10 November, he was noted as being a king’s servant and yeoman of the larder of the king’s household when he was given a commission to take carriage for the same office. On 5 February 1413 Henry IV granted him a messuage and 40 acres of land in Solyhull in the county of Warwick called ‘Caldefordestenement’, which was confirmed 14 June 1413 by Henry V. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 36, 101,139, 174,461; CPR 1413-6, p. 50 In 1415, John Birkin indented to serve with William Bangor, Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille, Roger Semper and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3
Blaby Thomas Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Blaby indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Blakbone William Esquire under investigation In 1415, William Blakbone indented to serve with three other esquires, James Blount, Richard Etton and John Elham, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/216 (with three others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Blakebury William cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, William Blakebury indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain and William Chamberlain. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Blakeman John archer under investigation In 1415, John Blakeman indented to serve with five other archers, all wheelwrights in the royal household, John Flete, Robert Lety, Walter Wheller, Thomas Wheller and Thomas Leycestre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Blaket John Esquire Although John Blaket was apparently born in Warwickshire, he represented Leicestershire threee times in parliament and Gloucestershire once. He came to settle at Icomb, near Stow-on-the-Wold in Gloucestershire. In the early stages of his career, Blaket was attached to the household of the earl of Northumberland’s son, Sir Henry Percy (‘Hotspur’, d. 1403) . By 1398 he was described as a king’s esquire though he was still in Percy’s service as well. Richard’s deposition proved no barrier to John and as early in Henry IV’s reign as 16 October 1399 he was granted a substantial annuity of £40, being already a member of the new King’s household. In 1402 Blaket was overseas as one of the escorts of the King’s elder daughter, Blanche, on her journey to Cologne for her wedding to Louis, Count Palatine, son of the King of the Romans. There can be no doubt that he proved his worth as a soldier by 1415 when he was knighted for when, on 15 February 1417, the Council came to consider the appointment of the marshal for the second invasion of France, Blaket’s name appeared on a shortlist of three. In the event he was not selected for this prestigious post, but he did join in the campaign, remaining in France throughout 1418, and participating in the siege of Rouen and seemingly not returning home until 1421. In his will, made on 19 April 1430, Blaket asked to be buried in St. Mary’s chapel in Icomb church (the building of which he is thought to have financed), and requested the abbot of Bruern to conduct his funeral. It seems probable that his instructions were followed since his tomb can be found in the south transcept there today. His third wife Elizabeth (m. after 1420) had previously been married to William Wilcotes. Her son, Thomas, also indented to serve Henry V in 1415. His house, Icomb Place, begun in the thirteenth century and added to by Sir John survives relatively intact as a private dwelling. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Blaket’s retinue consisted of himself, a man-at-arms and 6 archers. All were placed in the garrison of Harfleur and thus did not fight at the battle. 8 TNA C76/98 m. 20; TNA E404/31/308; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6; TNA E358/6 rot 5
Blakman Thomas Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Blakman indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham and John Perott. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Blount James Esquire under investigation In 1415, James Blount indented to serve with three other esquires, Richard Etton, John Elham and William Blakbone, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 16 TNA E404/31/216 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m.2
Blount John Knight Nephew of Sir John Blount (d.1425) knight of the shire for Worcestershire in 1399 and 1404, John was described as a king’s esquire on 4 November 1401 when he was granted two manors formerly belonging to Lord Despenser in the counties of Lincolnshire and Rutland. On 22 October 1402 he was retained by Henry IV at an annual fee of £20; this was confirmed by Henry V on 26 June 1413. He had been knighted by 1403 when he was appointed as a commissioner of array for the county of Worcester, to assemble men to serve against the rebels in Wales. On 14 March 1405 he was described as a king’s knight. From 1408 he was constable of Tutbury castle, and between 1409 and 1412 also of Newcastle under Lyme and Monmouth. Blount was a JP in Worcestershire and Derbyshire on several occasions. In 1410 he served at sea as lieutenant of Thomas Beaufort, admiral of England. He also participated in the 1412 expedition to France. He became a knight of the Garter in 1417 and participated in Henry’s conquest of Normandy dying in single combat at the gates of Rouen in Aug 1418 In 1415, John Blount indented to serve with 19 men-at-arms and 60 archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 80 TNA E101/69/5/428; TNA E404/31/150; TNA E101/45/5 m.4d;
Blundell Henry Esquire Henry Blundell was the eldest son of Nicholas Blundell, a member of the gentry in Lancashire who was elected to parliament in April 1414. Nicholas died in 1423 and Henry inherited the principal estates of his father in 1423. He also acquired additional lands in Ditton, as a result of his marriage to Joan, the daughter and co-heir of Henry Rixton. www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Henry Blundell indented to serve with another man at arms, Adam Whittingham, with each man providing 3 archers. (Blundell is also in a sick list but there is other evidence he was at the battle.) 8 TNA E101/69/4/408 (with Adam Whittington); TNA E404/31/275; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4
Blundell Henry Esquire Henry Blundell was the eldest son of Nicholas Blundell, a member of the gentry in Lancashire who was elected to parliament in April 1414. Nicholas died in 1423 and Henry inherited the principal estates of his father in 1423. He also acquired additional lands in Ditton, as a result of his marriage to Joan, the daughter and co-heir of Henry Rixton. www.historyofparliamentonline.org. It is not clear why he indented twice for the campaign In 1415, Henry Blundell indented to serve with four other Lancashire esquires; Thurstan Anderton, William Orell, Henry Pemberton, Henry Blundell and Adam Whittingham. In the event, they served with 12 archers. One of their number, Adam Whittingham, fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England but the remainder fought at the battle surviving to be shipped home from Calais with 6 horses. (Blundell is also in a sick list but there is other evidence he was at the battle.) 8 TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA E101/69/6/477 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/275; TNA E101/46/17; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 14;TNA E358/6 rot. 1d.
Blythe Richard Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, Richard Blythe indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Bodrygge John yeomen of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, John Bodrygge indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle serving as archers. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Bokelmaker Dirk Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Dirk Bokelmaker indented to serve with five other master gunners, William Gerardesson, Walter Slotmaker, Godfrey Goykyn, Dederico Van Hesill, and Arnold Skade. Dirk Bokelmaker was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town TNA E101/69/8/511 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Bolde Thomas de Esquire A Thomas Bole represented Bedford as an MP in 1421 and 1423 but it is not clear whether it is the same person. Www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Thomas de Bolde indented to serve with another esquire, James Hoget, each providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/4/385 (with James Hoget); TNA E404/31/345TNA E101/45/5 m. 5;
Bole John Carpenter under investigation In 1415, John Bole indented to serve with five other men, all described as carpenters of the hall, William Carpenter, John Westwode, William Batte, John Wyke and Thomas Kent. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/390 (with 5 others)
Bolron Robert Esquire under investigation In 1415, Robert Bolron indented to serve with two other esquires, John Skipton and John Ireby, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 9 TNA E101/69/6/457 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/270; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1.
Bolton John archer under investigation In 1415, John Bolton indented to serve with nine other archers, Thomas Breuster, Richard Chircheman, Thomas Norton, Nicholas Fwy, William Buxton, John Porto, John Croysier, John Pilton and John Leche. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others)
Bordiu John doctor of law master John Bordili (or Bordiu), doctor of law, was a Gascon cleric who became archdeacon of the Medoc, and was in 1416 made vicar of Harfleur by Henry VI. there has been some thought that he was the author of the Gesta Henrici Quinti. He was certainly on the campign, writing a letter to the city of Bordeaux from the siege camp at Harfleur on 3 September (A. Curry, The Battle of Agincourt. Sources and Interpretations, 2000, pp. 445-6) In 1415, John Bordiu indented to serve with 2 archers, but no further details of their service are known 3 TNA E404/31/402; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Bortherton John Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, John Bortherton indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Boston John yeoman of the wardrobe under investigation In 1415, John Boston indented to serve with five other men, all described as yeomen of the great wardrobe, Roger Holbeth, William Curson, Thomas Werkworth, Thomas White and Hugh Skynnier TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 (with 5 others)
Boteler William Knight William Butler was one of 46 gentlemen who received the honour of knighthood on the eve of Henry IV’s coronation in October 1399. In addition, he was granted a life annuity of £40. In 1406 he was MP for Lancashire. longside his personal retinue of 40 men in 1415, he commanded a group of 50 archers from Lancashire. Butler died during the latter stages of the siege of Harfleur in late September 1415. His body was probably sent back to England for burial in the friary church at Warrington. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Sir William Butler indented to serve with nine men-at-arms and 30 archers. He died at the siege. As his troops were paid for the first quarter onwards it seems likely that they were distributed amongst other retinues before the second quarter began. 40 TNA C 76/98 m. 15; TNA E101/69/5/427; TNA E404/31/237; TNA E101/45/5 m.2d; E 358/6 rot. 2 (lancs archers): Ag Roll
Botiller John yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, John Botiller indented to serve with William Bangor, Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille, Roger Semper and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Botreaux William, lord baron William was born in either 1388 or 1389 at Kilmersdon in north Somerset and died in 1462. His service in 1415 is the only record we have of a military career. Some time before 1411, he married Elizabeth Beaumont and named her and their two daughters in the will he made before sailing to France in 1415. Botreaux’s retinue was supposed to have consisted of himself, 2 knights, 17 men-at-arms and 40 archers. In the event, he failed to supply 1 knight at his initial muster and was excused 5 men-at-arms and 4 archers. His retinue was made part of the garrison at Harfleur, though he with 5 others were invalided home. 60 TNA C76/98 m. 9; 11; 19A; TNA E404/31/151; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5; TNA E101/45/22 m. 23; TNA E101/45/18 m. 3; TNA E101/47/7
Bountenips William Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, William Bountenips indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Bourchier Hugh, Lord baron Sir Hugh Stafford (1374-1420) was the fourth son of Hugh, second earl of Stafford (d. 1386), and was summoned to parliament as lord Bourchier in 1411 through his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Bartholemew, Lord Bourchier (d. 1409). He continued to serve in the French campaigns after 1417, but died in October 1420. His wife’s second husband was Sir Louis Robessart who, as an esquire, had led a small retinue on the 1415 campaign. Bourchier’s retinue consisted of himself, 19 men-at-arms and 40 archers. All were placed in the garrison at Harfleur and thus none fought in the battle. 60 TNA C76/98 m. 15; TNA E404/31/152; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2d; TNA E101/47/6
Bourchier William Knight William Bourchier was born around 1376 to a family which had risen to prominence through royal service in the fourteenth century. In 1401 he became a knight of the household of Henry Prince of Wales and was involved in the wars in Wales. He made a highly advantageous clandestine marriage to Anne, countess of Stafford, the only surviving child of the late Thomas of Woodstock, duke of Gloucester, last son of Edward III. Following Agincourt, he was made constable of the Tower of London and was entrusted with the custody of the principal prisoners from the battle. He participated in the 1416 resuce of HArfleur with 120 men, and on the 1417 campaignIn Normandy with a retinue of 164 men. He played an important role in the conquest of Normandy, becoming captain of Dieppe in 1419. In January 1420 Henry created him count of Eu. He died in Troyes on 28 May 1420, only a week after Henry sealed a major teeaty with the French. His body was sent back to England for burial at Llanthony Prior in Gloucestershire. In 1415, William Bourchier indented to serve with 29 men-at-arms and 90 archers. 120 TNA E101/69/7/487; TNA E404/31/344; TNA E101/45/5 m.5d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 18; Ag Roll
Bowet Nicholas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Bowet indented to serve with Thomas Bowet, presumably his brother, each providing 3 archers. Although Nicholas lost 3 ‘valetti’ at Harfleur, they appear to have been servants rather than soldiers since he and his 3 archers fought at the battle and survived to be shipped home from Calais with 4 horses. 4 TNA E101/69/3/371 (with Thomas Bowet); TNA E404/31/384; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8; TNA E101/47/5
Bowet Thomas Esquire Appears to be multiple Thomas Bowets around in the reign of Henry V : A Thomas Bowet was described as being a knight on 24 October 1418 on the king’s service overseas – CPR 1416-1422 p. 173. A Thomas Bowet is mentioned in connection with Maraget ‘late the wife of Thomas Bowet, esquire’ on 24 November 1421 – CPR 1416-1422 p. 400. Thomas held a manor in Norfolk (Hagsford) of the Duchess of York at the time of the her death in August 1415. In 1415, Thomas Bowet indented to serve with Nicholas Bowet, presumably his brother, each providing 3 archers. Although Nicholas lost 3 ‘valetti’ at Harfleur, they appear to have been servants rather than soldiers since he and his 3 archers fought at the battle and survived to be shipped home from Calais with 4 horses. 4 TNA E101/69/3/371 (with Nicholas Bowet); TNA E404/31/384; n; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8; TNA E101/47/5
Bowre Matthew archer under investigation In 1415, Matthew Bowre indented to serve with 7 other esquires, Griffin Percevale, William Smythson, John West, John Benyfeld, Roger Shermay, Thomas Berton and Nicholas Sanle. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/380 (with 7 others); TNA E404/31/320; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Bradshawe William Esquire William Bradshaw appears to have been the son of Roger Bradshaw; the latter was a member of the gentry in the East Midlands, who served as a member of parliament for Derbyshire in 1406 and Staffordshire in March 1416. Roger also served as rider and ranger of Ashdown Forest in Sussex for the duchy of Lancaster in the 1390s and was later promoted to master forester for Ashdown Forest in the reign of Henry IV and later died in 1431. www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, William Bradshaw’s retinue consisted of himself and 3 archers. Bradshaw himself died at Harfleur but his 3 archers fought at the battle and returned to England from Calais with 4 horses. 4 TNA C76/98 m. 13; TNA E101/69/3/364; TNA E404/31/262; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2; TNA E358/6 rot 9d
Bradwardine William Esquire presumably william Bradwardine, surgeon? Unless there is another man of this name In 1415, William Bradwardine indented to serve with 3 archers. This seems to be a separate indenture from that of Bradwardine as surgeon. 3 TNA E101/45/5 m 6
Bradwardine William surgeon William Bradwardine was king’s surgeon, along with Thomas Morestede. In 1416 he was also appointed to take surgeons and other artificers for making certain instruments necessary for an expedition to France. In 1415, William Bradwardine indented to serve with 12 surgeons and 3 archers, but no further details of their service is known 16 TNA E101/69/6/451; TNA E404/31/420; ; TNA E101/45/5 m. 11, m 6 (archers); TNA E101/48/3
Brampton Nicholas Stuffer of bascinets under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Brampton indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik and Laurence Herforthshire. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Brancepath William Esquire By 1415, William Brauncepath had enjoyed a long career in royal service. He had been retained by Richard II for an annual fee of £10 which had been renewed by Henry IV and reconfirmed by Henry V in 1413. He seems to have been a valued but relatively minor official in the household who died before 15 October 1415, probably of disease during the siege of Harfleur. His annual fee, paid from royal revenues in Lincolnshire, was regranted after his death to two other household officials also present on the 1415 campaign, John Sankey, a yeoman of the king’s hall and Walter Kendale, a yeoman of the buttery. He seems likely to have come from Northamptonshire: a William Brauncepath possibly William’s son, was MP for Nothampton in 1427 as an esquire and later as a knight, in 1437. A John Brauncepath, possibly his son, of Exton, Rutland was also MP for the county in 1437 and again in 1442. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, William Brauncepath indented to serve with four other esquires, John Selby, Bertram France, Henry Filongley and Robert Brut. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 13, 19; TNA E404/31/309; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; TNA E101/46/12
Breton John Clerk of the hall under investigation In 1415, John Breton indented to serve with three other clerks, John Desye, John Hanham and William Sharpton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/361
Breuster Richard yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, Richard Brouster, valettus, indented directly with the crown with Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere, Gregory Scalder, William Shorne and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Breuster Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Breuster indented to serve with nine other archers, Richard Chircheman, Thomas Norton, Nicholas Fwy, William Buxton, John Porto, John Bolton, John Croysier, John Pilton and John Leche. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 10 TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Bridde Thomas Clerk of the royal household under investigation In 1415, Thomas Bridde indented to serve with four other clerks of the household, Randolph Appulton, William Pek, Robert Allerton and Richard Reston. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 5 TNA E404/31/338 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Brigford John purveyor under investigation In 1415, John Brigford indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, William Hether, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Brokesby William Esquire Of Shoby near Melton Mowbray in Leicstershire, Brokesby’s career was made in the service of Henry IV. As early in the reign as June 1400 he was a member of the King’s household then about to leave Pontefract on its way at the head of the royal army marching on Scotland. On 7 November 1401, William was granted a life annuity of 40 marks. Six months later he was among those delegated to escort Henry’s elder daughter, Princess Blanche, to Cologne for her marriage, accordingly being absent from England until 26 July 1402. Access to royal patronage could enable a privileged few to avoid the consequences of litigation: later that year Brokesby was pardoned his outlawry for failure to appear in the lawcourts to answer the prior of Wormsley, Herefordshire, for a substantial debt of 200 marks, and in March 1403 the King granted him back all the goods and chattels declared forfeit on this account. In 1404 William served as an MP for Leicestershire and was twice sheriff of Leicestershire and Warwickshire in 1404-5 and 1408-9. Brokesby is not mentioned in the household accounts of March to October 1413, immediately following the accession of Henry V, and it seems likely that he had to relinquish his post as marshal of the King’s hall when Henry of Bolingbroke died. Yet the new King confirmed his annuities (amounting to 60 marks) and in April 1415, Furthermore, at embarkation Brokesby was among the 13 ‘hensemen de Roy’ – Royal ‘henchmen’ – here probably meaning a groom or personal attendant – in the royal entourage. Brokesby died, perhaps of the effects of the Harfleur-Agincourt campaign, shortly before 23 Feb. 1416. He was probably still a comparatively young man, for his younger brother Bartholomew, an MP for Leicestershire no fewer than six times between 1410 and 1432, survived him by 32 years and William’s own, widow Joan by at least 37. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, William Brokesby contracted to serve in France with one other man-at-arms, Baldwin Bugge, each of whom provide 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/5/442; TNA E404/31/355; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d;
Bromley Henry Esquire/serjeant at arms 23 May 1413, Henry Bromley was commissioned to take carpenters for the repair of a ship at Sandwich (CPR Hen V vol. 1, p. 36); 20 May 1415, granted for life, in merit of his service, 12d daily as a sergeant (ibid. p. 328) at arms13 July 1415, he was commissioned, as a sergeant at arms, with Thomas Castell, captain of a ship called ‘le Cok Jon’ [The Cog, John] to take mariners for the transport of men to France (ibid, p. 406). He was later appointed to supervise the muster of the retinue of John Holland, earl of Huntingdon, in Southampton in 1416. In the early 1420s he was also appointed to a number of royal commissions which were related to cases of piracy. CPR 1416-1422, pp. 71, 307, 390, 391, 402, 425, 443 In 1415, Henry Bromley indented to serve with 4 other esquires, John Clynk, Nicholas Horton, John Louthe and William Wolde who together provided 11 archers. John Louthe and William Wolde remained in Harfleur as members of the garrison with 3 archers. Clynk, Bromley and Horton and 8 archers fought at the battle and survived to return to England from Calais with 11 horses. TNA C76/98 m. 8; TNA E101/69/3/369 ( with 4 others); TNA E404/31/352; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7; TNA E101/45/9; TNA E101/46/11; TNA E358/6 rot 6 d;
Bromley John archer under investigation In 1415, John Bromley indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Browne John yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, John Browne indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Brut Robert Esquire Robert Brut was clearly a member of the royal household, who had been granted an annuity of £10 by Henry IV which was confirmed by Henry V on 1 February 1414. CPR 1413-1416, p. 158. If related to Walter Brut, possibly therefore of Hereforshire In 1415, Robert Brut indented to serve with four other esquires, John Selby, Bertram France, Henry Filongley and William Brancepath. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA E404/31/309; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; TNA E101/46/11; TNA E101/45/9; TNA E358/6 m. 6d;
Buckelee Richard Labourer under investigation In 1415, Richard Buckelee indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Bugge Baldwin Esquire Baldwin Bugge appears to have been from Leicestershire and was retained by Henry IV as a king’s serjeant with annuity of 20 marks. He was MP for the county twice in 1425 and in 1426 before dying in 1435. In 1415, Baldwin Bugge indented to serve with another man-at-arms, William Brokesby, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/5/442; TNA E404/31/355; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d;
Bukenham John archer under investigation In 1415, John Bukenham indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, Richard Marchant, John Kerby and Robert Castelton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 12 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Buntyngford Thomas smith under investigation In 1415, Thomas Buntyngford indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Richard Hodell, John Weble, John Heggeman, John Dauson, John Hille, Robert Preston, John Peche, John de Saint Albans and John Shrowesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Burcestre Nicholas yeoman of the bakehouse under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Burcestre indented to serve with seven other men, described as yeomen of the bakehouse, Ralph Morley, Thomas Goldsmyth, Henry Wendone, John Keynesham, John Carpenter, Robert Mason and John Mason. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA E404/31/410 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Burcestre Thomas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Thomas Burcestre indented to serve with four other esquires, John Philip, John Belle, Robert Quykkesley and John Holton, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/398 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/299; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Burell John Chaplain under investigation In 1415, John Burell indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Burgh John Esquire there were several men of this name active at this time. A john Burgh served for many years in the French wars of Henry VI. This burgh is not the MP for Surrey since the latter was at the parliament of 1415 which occurred before the army returned to England. In 1415, John Burgh idented to serve with two other men-at-arms and nine archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 12 TNA E404/31/236; Ag roll
Burgoyne William Esquire under investigation In 1415, William Burgoyne indented to serve with five other esquires, John Clement, Robert Helyon, Henry Lounde, John Asco and Robert Asshefelde, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/291 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Burnham John archer under investigation In 1415, John Burnham indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Burton Richard yeoman of the household A Richard Burton, yeoman, of Husthwait is mentioned in 19 May 1421 as allegedly being involved in various acts of violence in the county of Yorkshire. CPR 1416-1422, pp. 386 In 1415, Richard Burton indented to serve with William Bangor, Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille, Roger Semper and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Burton Walter Clerk of the comptrollership under investigation In 1415, Walter Burton indented to serve with six other men, Stephen Payne, William Balne, John Feriby, Thomas Morton, John Langville and Robert Castel, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/5/412 (with 6 others); TNA E404/31/415 (with 6 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Burton William Esquire William Barton was granted a licence to remain in England having been born in Ireland or Wales for payment of half a mark (6s 10d) on 5 December 1413. He was possibly of Nottingham, or of Ipswich, as there was an MP there of that name in 1423. CPR 1413-1416, pp. 123, 315 In 1415, William Burton indented to serve with three other esquires, John Chetwynd, Ralph Pope and Nicholas Lary, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/459 (with 3 others); TNA E404/31/154; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d TNA E101/47/24;
Burton William Bowyer under investigation In 1415, William Burton indented to serve with four other bowyers, Nicholas Frost, William Swettoke, Robert Gyldeford and Thomas Shoylford. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/432
Burwell John Clerk under investigation In 1415, John Burwell indented to serve with another man, John Mildenhale, both described as clerks of the king’s chapel. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 2 TNA E404/31/411; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Butiller John Esquire John Butiller was described as being of Huntingdon when appointed to a commission on 3 December 1409. On 7 February 1417 John Butiller was given an annuity of £40. He was later described as a yeoman of the kitchen when he was given a further an annual grant of £5 on 16 November 1420. Butler is mentioned as being deceased by March 1422. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 13, 52, 127, 153, 293, 329,331,372,378, 393, 481; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 25, 27, 69, 97, 188, 218, 233, 235, 307, 334, 338, 392, 431 In 1415, John Butiller indented to serve with another esquire, Lewis Robessart. Each man provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/3/366 (with Lewis Robessart);TNA E101/45/5 m.3d; TNA E404/31/290
Butte William Armourer under investigation In 1415, William Butte indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Butter John yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, John Butter indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Buxton William archer under investigation In 1415, William Buxton indented to serve with nine other archers, Thomas Breuster, Richard Chircheman, Thomas Norton, Nicholas Fwy, John Porto, John Bolton, John Croysier, John Pilton and John Leche. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Bydlingytun George Master gunner under investigation In 1415, George Brydlingytun indented to serve with four other master gunners, Thomas Plum, John Charyng, John Sawer and John Pegast. George Brydlingyton was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle, but did serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/516 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9;
Cambridge Richard, earl of earl Richard was born at Conisburgh Castle, Yorkshire, in 1385 to Edward III’s fifth son, Edmund of Langley, duke of York, and Isabella of Castile, and was the younger brother of Edward, duke of York who died at the battle. He was created earl of Cambridge in 1414 but the title came without either land or money and Richard was the poorest of the English earls. Richard hatched a plot to assassinate Henry and put the young Edmund, earl of March in his place. The plot was uncovered at Southampton and Richard was executed with his co-conspirators, Henry, lord Scrope of Masham and Sir Thomas Grey of Heton. His body was buried at God’s House, Southampton. Following the death of his brother at the battle, his son Richard (1411-61) was heir to the duchy of York, and put forward a claim to the throne in 1460. Killed at the battle of Wakefield, his son seized control as Edward IV. Cambridge’s retinue consisted of himself, 2 knights, 57 men-at-arms and 150 archers. Even though their leader was executed before the army set sail, they went with the army to France but details of their service are unknown. 210 TNA E 404/31/276; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5; Ag Roll
Camoys Thomas, lord baron Born around 1350, Thomas had a limited military career in France and Scotland, but was also active in diplomacy under Henry IV and in local government in Sussex, Surrey and Hampshire. He married Elizabeth Mortimer, Henry Percy’s (Hotspur) widow, who was herself a great granddaughter of Edward III. He was among those were appointed to the commission which tried the Southampton plotters. At Camoys commanded the rear guard on the left. He died in 1421 and is commemorated in a fine memorial brass in the church of Trotton, Sussex. Wall paintings in the same church may also have been commissioned by Camoys. In 1415, Camoys’ indented to serve with a retinue of 90, consisting of himself, 2 knights, 27 men-at-arms and 60 archers. One of his men-at-arms, Samson Brocas, was put into garrison in Harfleur while another man-at-arms and 11 other men were invalided home from the siege. He was paid for the service of 86 men (himself, 1 knight, 24 men-at-arms and 60 archers) at the battle, suggesting he might have had some reinforcements joining his retinue after the siege. Shipping for 77 men with 70 horses was supplied for the return to England, suggesting a few losses at the battle. French prisoners were taken worth over 290 crowns in ransom but we do not know how many or who took them. 90 TNA C76/98 m. 19A; TNA 404/31/357; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d; TNA E101/45/21 m. 30; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 15; TNA E101/47/13; E358/6 rot. 3; Ag Roll
Caninbrigge Thomas cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Caninbrigge indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Carbrok John Cellarer under investigation In 1415, John Carbrok indented to serve with three other men, described as ‘cellarers’, Richard Beure, John Hardyng and Edward Sadeler. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others)
Carew Thomas Knight banneret Born around 1368 Carew spent most of his life in Devon but took his name and title of ‘baro’ (though he was never summoned to parliament as a peer) from Carew in Pembrokeshire. He was involved in the Welsh wars as captain of Narberth Castle in 1402. His familiarity with naval as well as military matters led to his being commissioned on 18 February 1415 (during the absence of the admiral, Thomas Beaufort, earl of Dorset) to patrol the sea and make the channel safe in anticipation of Henry V’s expedition. He made his will on 16 July 1429 at Dartmouth, asking to be buried in the parish church of Luppitt near Honiton. He was dead by 27 January 1431. See the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Carew’s retinue consisted of himself, 11 men-at-arms and 24 archers, all of whom were detailed into garrison at Harfleur. he was still serving there in April 1416. A further 5 men-at-arms and 22 archers said to be in his company were invalided home after the siege, suggesting he had had additional men joined with him. 36 TNA C 76/98 m. 13; TNA E404/31/385; TNA E101/45/5 m.8; TNA E101/45/21, m. 27; TNA E101/47/15
Carpenter John yeoman of the bakehouse under investigation In 1415, John Carpenter indented to serve with seven other men, described as yeomen of the bakehouse, Nicholas Burcestre, Ralph Morley, Thomas Goldsmyth, Henry Wendone, John Keynesham, Robert Mason and John Mason. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/410 (with 7 others)
Carpenter William Carpenter under investigation In 1415, William Carpenter indented to serve with five other men, all described as carpenters of the hall, John Westwode, William Batte, John Wyke, John Bole and Thomas Kent. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 6 TNA E404/31/390 (with 5 others)
Carters John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Carters indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Castel Richard archer under investigation In 1415, Richard Castell indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, William Petham, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Castel Robert Esquire/clerk of marshalcy Robert Castell was a Warwickshire man who twice served as an MP for the county, in 1414 and 1420 and justice of the peace for the same county between 1417 and 1423 in addition to serving as sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire in 1411-12. Castell had furthered himself through service to Henry IV and, more important, to the latter’s son Henry of Monmouth. As early in the reign as 13 Nov. 1399 he had been described as a ‘King’s servant’ when made a grant of £5, and before a year had passed he had joined the household of the prince of Wales as one of his esquires. Rewards for Castell’s services came not only from Prince Henry but also from the King: in 1407 he was given 20 couples of bream from Kenilworth to stock his pond at Alspath, now more commonly called Meriden, Warwickshire. It seems that this manor came from his wife, Margery, the widow of John Cokkes of Coventry. It was sold, sometime before 1432, to another veteran of the Agincourt campaign, Sir John Chetwynd (d. 1448). In 1415, Robert Castel was clerk to the Marshalcy – the court which heard disputes within the royal household – and indented to serve with the rank of man-at-arms with Stephen Payne, the king’s almoner who was responsible for distributing alms to the poor on the king’s behalf. Robert’s life appears to have ended as the result of violence. On 5 March 1436 Castel and his wife were involved in an affray at Berkswell caused by their attempts to evict a tenant. He may have been wounded, for he died less than three weeks later, on the 22nd. Although two fifteenth century effigies survive on Alspath/Meriden church, neither belongs to Castel. One commemorates and member of the Botiller family while the other is to Sir John Wyard (d. c. 1404). See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Robert Castel indented to serve with six other men, Stephen Payne, William Balne, John Feriby, Thomas Morton, Walter Burton and John Langville, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/5/412 (with 6 others); TNA E404/31/415; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d; TNA E358/6 rot. 9;
Castellon William Esquire under investigation In 1415, William Castellon indented to serve with four other esquires, Thomas Appulton, Thomas Mapurley, John Agarston and Thomas Corbet, each of which provide 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/447; TNA E404/31/287; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d;
Castleton Robert archer under investigation In 1415, Robert Castelton indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, Richard Marchant, John Kerby and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 12 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Caue William Chaplain under investigation In 1415, William Caue indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Cawardyn David archer under investigation In 1415, David Cawardyn indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Cawardyn Owain archer under investigation In 1415, Owain Cawardyn indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Chalons Robert Knight Robert Chalons seems to have been born in the early 1360s, and hailed from Plympton in Devon. He served in the retinue of Edward, earl of Devon, during the 1387 naval expedition under the earl of Arundel, and was already an esquire of the earl in 1384. Later that year, he was retained by Henry Bolingbroke, earl of Derby, and accompanied him on his expedition to Prussia in 1390. Following the accession of bolingbroke as Henry IV, he was made a knight of the King’s Chamber in 1402. He served again in later campaigns in Normandy, being in the royal entourage in France in 1421, and was MP for Devon in 1420. He died on 6 February 1445. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org. In 1415, Sir Robert Chalons indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. Chalons, together with the two men-at-arms and six of the archers, were put into the garrison of Harfleur. The remaining three archers participated in the rest of the campaign and fought at the battle. 12 TNA C 76/98 m. 20; TNA E101/69/4/383 ;TNA E404/31/218; TNA E101/45/5 m.3d; TNA E 101/45/18 m. 4; TNA E 358/6 rot 2
Chamberlain John Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, John Chamberlain indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Chamberlain Robert cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, Robert Chamberlain indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Chamberlain William cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, William Chamberlain indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Chartley Edmund Ferrers, lord baron Ferrers (b. 1386) was lord of Chartley Castle, Staffordshire situated between Uttoxeter and Stafford. He served on the 1416 expedition to rescue Harfleur, and in the conquest of Normandy, being at the sieges of Rouen, Melun and Meaux. He died in 1435. Ferrer’s retinue consisted of himself, 11 men-at-arms and 36 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume all were at the battle. 48 TNA E 404/31/249; TNA E101/45/5 m2d; Ag Roll
Chartur Robert yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Robert Chartur indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Charyng John Master gunner under investigation In 1415, John Charyng indented to serve with four other master gunners, Thomas Plum, George Brydlingytun, John Sawer and John Pegast. John Charyng was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/516 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9;
Chaucer Thomas Esquire The son of Geoffrey Chaucer, Thomas was a substantial figure in his own right. He held a multitude of offices for the House of Lancaster in the course of his career and was speaker of the House of Commons in the parliaments of 1407, 1410, 1411, November 1414 and May 1421 and represented Oxfordshire in parliament fourteen times between 1401 and 1431. In the judgement of the historian Carole Rawcliffe, ‘Chaucer possessed that elusive blend of charisma, authority and shrewdness essential for the successful management of men in late medieval society.’ The overriding influence on Chaucer’s career was his intimate relationship with the house of Lancaster. Speculation on the part of some writers that he may actually have been an illegitimate son of John of Gaunt remains completely unfounded, but reflects the closeness of his dealings with the latter and his family. He certainly accompanied Gaunt to Iberia in 1386 and was sufficiently identified with him to be deprived of his offices on his death by Richard II. Established at Ewelme in Oxfordshire, and an exceptionally wealthy landowner, Chaucer never assumed the rank of knight for which he was so obviously qualified, opting instead to pay the customary £5 fine for exemption. His ability and trust earned by Henry V led to him being appointed to a number of significant positions and in 1415, although he failed to embark through illness, as chief butler most of his time and energy were given over to provisioning the royal army. The financial problems, too, were considerable, and by the summer of 1416 he was owed over £2,842 for wine consumed by the expeditionary force. He also occupied a great number of administrative roles and was a member of several diplomatic missions as well as the royal council. Following Henry V’s death, Chaucer’s ability as a political operator were employed in the services of cardinal Beaufort and his influence can be gauged in the three marriages of his only daughter, Alice (d. 1475). Her first was to Sir John Phelip, who died at Harfleur, her second to another noted soldier, Thomas earl of Salisbury (d. Orleans 1428) and her third to William de la Pole, earl, and later duke of Suffolk (d. 1447). Thomas meanwhile died at Ewelme on 18 November 1434 and was buried in the chancel of the parish church where he is commemorated, with his wife, by a brass on a tomb chest commissioned in their memory by their daughter, Alice whose own elaborate tomb can be found in the same church. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Thomas Chaucer’s retinue consisted of himself, 11 men-at-arms and 36 archers. but he becamse ill and did not cross with expedition. none the less his retinue was present at the battle as the particulars of his account show. 48 TNA E101/69/5/443;TNA E404/31/219; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/47/29; Ag roll
Chaunge Simon Fletcher under investigation In 1415, Simon Chaunge indented to serve with five other fletchers, Robert Michell, William Hersegaunt, John Cowpere, John Morys and Robert Wayn. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/436 (with 5 others)
Chaworth Thomas Knight Thomas Chaworth was probably born in the late 1380s. He was retained as a knight of the royal body at an annual fee of 40 marks in June 1401. In subsequent years he served in expeditions to Scotland and Wales. Chaworth was arrested in January 1414 for his participation in Sir John Oldcastle’s Lollard uprising but was pardoned in May of the same year. Following the Agincourt campaign, he was able to regain his position in society, such as serving as sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derybyshire in 1417. He died in 1459. In 1415, SirThomas Chaworth indented to serve with seven men-at-arms and 24 archers. The whole contingent fought at the battle of Agincourt, with a prisoner Edrard de Droyle taken for ransom by the archer Robert Sadler, the total ransom being £58.13.4. On their return to England at the end of the campaign they were accompanied by 51 horses. 32 TNA C 78/98 m. 21; TNA E101/69/5/416; TNA E404/31/153; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2d; TNA E101/45/20, m. 2; TNA E 358/6 rot 5d
Chenduyt John Esquire John Chenduyt was from a family whose origins were near King’s Langley, Hertfordshire, but of a branch established in Cornwall since the end of the thirteenth century. Remarkably inactive in public life, he represented Cornwall in parliament three times between 1395 and 1407. In 1424, he arranged that his property should descend to his illegitimate children, Richard and Joan, wife of John Pengelly. But after his death, which occurred on 13 Dec. 1426, his wishes were ignored. Richard died shortly afterwards, but Joan, who was still alive in 1440, was disinherited: after prolonged inquiry Chenduyt’s heirs were found to be his kinsmen, Ralph Trenewith of Fentongollen and Thomas Rescarre. At the time of his death Chenduyt was holding, as well as Bodannan and the bailiwick of Trigg, messuages in Bodmin together with over 1,600 acres of pasture, furze, heath and meadow elsewhere in Cornwall. Records suggest that his military service was confined to 1415 and 1417 and on the former occasion, he was many who fell ill at Harfleur, being given permission to return to England on 6 October. Unlike his two archers, therefore, John did not fight at the battle. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Chenduyt’s retinue consisted of himself and 2 archers. Chenduyt was among those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given license to return to England which he did with 2 horses. His archers, however, remained with the army and fought at the battle, surviving to return home from Calais with 6 horses. 3 TNA E101/69/5/445; TNA E404/31/400; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 14; TNA E101/47/28; TNA E358/6 rot. 6;
Chetwynd John Esquire The third or fourth son of Sir William Chetwynd (d. 1395), John came of age by 1411, when he was a feoffee of property in Stafford with his brother Richard (d. c. 1418). His lasting attachment was to Richard, earl of Warwick (d. 1439). Indeed, on 8 May 1428 Chetwynd was privileged to be one of four esquires who together with four knights were charged with the duty of waiting on Henry VI’s person, all eight being assigned to serve under the earl, the young King’s ‘governor’. Accordingly, in 1430 Chetwynd travelled to France for the King’s coronation at Paris. Since 1425, or earlier, he had been serving as steward of the earl’s estates in Staffordshire, for which he received an annual fee of £3 6s.8d. he served again, in Calais in 1434. Chetwynd acquired Alspath, now more commonly called Meriden, Warwickshire some time before 1432 by purchase from Robert Castel, who had served in 1415 as a member of Henry V’s household. He was twice MP for Warwickshire, in 1421 and 1437 and as a justice of the peace in the same county between 1434 and 1443. He died some time before 1449 but the precise date and his place of burial are now unknown. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Chetwynd indented to serve with three other esquires, Ralph Pope, Nicholas Lary and William Burton, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 16 TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA E101/69/6/459; TNA E404/31/154; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d; TNA E101/47/14; 24; 25; 27;
Cheyne John Esquire There are several men of this name and it is not wholly clear which this one is. John son of Sir John Cheney of Chenies Bucks sat in the parliament of 1415 so cannot have been on the campaign. Sir John (d. 1420), son of the Lollard knight Sir John Cheyne of Beckford, Gloucs (d. 1414) is a possibility but not a certainty. A John Cheyne was given an annuity of £40 by Henry IV on 12 November 1409, where he was described as being a king’s esquire. A man of this name had been knighted by 27 October 1420 when he was also given the wardship of the lands of the late William Cheyne, during the minority of his son and heir Edmund. He served on commissions of the peace in Gloucestershire on 21 March 1413 and Buckinghamshire on 18 February 1419 and 12 February 1422. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 148; CPR 1413-6, pp. 132,244,401,419; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 26, 33, 250, 310, 423, 450 In 1415, John Cheyne’s retinue consisted of himself, 3 men-at-arms and 12 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 16 TNA E404/31/220; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2d; Ag roll
Chich Roger yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, Roger indented to serve with William Bangor, Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille, Roger Semper and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Chircheman Richard archer under investigation In 1415, Richard Chircheman indented to serve with nine other archers, Thomas Breuster, Thomas Norton, Nicholas Fwy, William Buxton, John Porto, John Bolton, John Croysier, John Pilton and John Leche. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Clarence Thomas, duke of duke Thomas, the eldest brother of Henry V, was born in 1387. His father’s favourite son, he served as royal lieutenant in Ireland. In 1412, he led an army of 4000 men in support of the duke of Orléans against the duke of Burgundy. In 1415, he led one of the largest companies in the army and presided over the trial of the conspirators involved in the Southampton Plot. Clarence was one of those who contracted dysentery at Harfleur and returned to England, but he played a full part in his brother’s invasion of Normandy in 1417 and in the war thereafter. He was killed at the battle of Baugé in 1421. A fine tomb effigy is in St Michael’s chapel in Canterbury Cathedral. Clarence’ indented for the largest company of the whole army, at 960 men: it comprised himself, his young step-son Henry Beaufort, earl of Somerset (1401-18) (son of John Beaufort, earl of Somerset who died in 1410), 2 barons and bannerets, one of whom was Humphrey, Lord FitzWalter, 14 knights, 222 men-at-arms and 720 archers. Clarence contracted dysentery at Harfleur and was invalided home with 47 of his company. Of the rest, 6 knights, 151 men-at-arms and 585 archers (742 in total) served at the battle. It does not appear that his company suffered any losses at the battle since all those present were provided with shipping to return home. Some prisoners were taken by his company at the battle worth around £600 in total ransoms. 960 TNA C76/98 m. 14, 22; TNA E404/31/155; TNA E101/45/5 m3; TNA E101/45/4; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 1; E358/6 rot 1
Clement John Esquire John Clement was granted 4 ½d per day by Richard II on 15 July 1393, which was subsequently confirmed by Henry IV on 13 November 1399. By February 1417 he was described as a king’s esquire, when he was granted £10 per annum for life. CPR 1413-6, pp. 88; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 54, 62 In 1415, John Clement indented to serve with five other esquires, Robert Helyon, William Burgoyne, Henry Lounde, John Asco and Robert Asshefelde, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 24 TNA E404/31/291 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Clement William Labourer under investigation In 1415, William Clement indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Clere David Labourer under investigation In 1415, David Clere indented to serve with three other named labourers, Philip Dew, John Ducas and Reynold John, as well as a further 116 other unnamed labourers. 120 TNA E101/69/8/517 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Clerk William archer under investigation In 1415, William Clerk indented to serve with seven other archers, Thomas Hervy, Thomas Ernysoy, Roger Martyn, Richard Hunt, John Base, John Compton and William Starky. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/305 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Clerkeson John archer under investigation In 1415, John Clerkeson indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Clidrowe Robert archer under investigation In 1415, Robert Clidrowe indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Cliff John Master Mason under investigation In 1415, John Cliff indented to serve with three other master masons, John Benet, John Colchestre and William Not, as well as a further 96 other unnamed masons . Given the nature of their trade they may have remained at Harfleur after its surrender but seems that at least some served at the battle since Not appears in the Agincourt roll. TNA E101/69/8/520 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Cliff John minstrel John Cliff was one of 23 minstrels to accompany the king in 1415. Nicolas provides the names of John Cliff and 12 others, John Norrys, trumpeter, William Baldwyn, John Michel, Panel Trumpeter, Peut trumpeter, Richard Piper, Thomas Haliday, Walter Haliday, Meysham Piper, Broune Piper, Snayth Fidler, William Langton, Thomas Hardiberd and William Halliday. The names give some idea of the composition of this group of minstrels: three trumpeters, two pipers and a fiddler, if their names are indicative. It is possible that Thomas, Walter and William Halliday were related and probable that John Cliff was their leader, since he was the only one to indent directly himself. In 1415, John Cliff indented to serve with 17 other ministrels, with all men present at the battle 18 TNA E101/45/5 m. 11 (ith 17 others); TNA E358/6 m. 11;
Clifford John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Clifford indented to serve with another esquire, Robert Rothington. Each man provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/5/431 (with Robert Rothington);TNA E404/31/343; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Clifford John, lord baron Born in 1389, John was a northern lord with interests in Westmorland and Yorkshire. In 1404 he married the daughter of Henry Percy, ‘Hotspur’ who was killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury in 1403.Clifford also joined Henry V in his invasion of Normandy in 1417 and was made a Knight of the Garter in 1421, but and died at the siege of Meaux in March 1422. In 1415, Clifford indented to serve with a retinue consisting of himself, 29 men-at-arms and 90 archers. Of these, 4 men-at-arms and 13 archers were invalided home from Harfleur but the rest were at the battle with their captain. 120 TNA C76/98 m. 12; TNA E 404/31/358; TNA E101/45/5 m.7; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/44/30 30 no. 1 m. 12
Clinton William, lord baron William, fourth baron Clinton, was born in 1377, with his main seat at Maxstoke in Warwickshire. His first known military service was to Ireland under Richard II in 1394. He also served on Henry IV’s expedition to Scotland in 1400. He served in expeditionary armies to France in 1424, 1427 and 1431, being killed there on 30 July in that last year. Clinton’s retinue consisted of himself, 19 men-at-arms and 40 archers. Of these 60 men, 15 were invalided home from Harfleur but both he and the rest of his men were at the battle. 60 TNA C76/98 m. 15; TNA E 404/31/346; TNA E101/45/5 m5; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 13; TNA E101/45/1
Clopham Richard purveyor under investigation In 1415, Richard Clopham indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, William Hether, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Clovn Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Clovn indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, William Hether, Richard Clopham, John Michel, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Clusman Petro Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Petro Clusman indented to serve with five other master gunners, Dederico Plomaker, Gerardo Van Vengarde, William Cutteller, Dederico de Vere and Calis Van Rosty. Petro Clusman was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/512; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9 (with 5 others);
Clux Hartank van Knight Hartank Von Clux was from Silesia but spent many ywars in England, serving on the Scottish campaign in 1400 (when he gained a grant of 40 marks per annum from the Exchequer) and in Wales. He was uaed by Henry V in various diplomatic negotations, especially with Emperor Sigismund. See the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. In 1415, Hartank van Clux indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 12 TNA E101/69/5/429; TNA E404/31/221; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 6; Ag Roll
Clynk John Esquire John Clynk was one of six men, appointed to look into a reported case of piracy on 15 July 1412. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 432, 433 In 1415, John Clynk indented to serve with 4 other esquires, Henry Bromley, Nicholas Horton, John Louthe and William Wolde who together provided 11 archers. John Louthe and William Wolde remained in Harfleur as members of the garrison with 3 archers. Clynk, Bromley and Horton and 8 archers fought at the battle and survived to return to England from Calais with 11 horses. TNA C76/98 m. 8; TNA E101/69/3/369 (with 4 others);TNA E404/31/352; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7; TNA E101/45/9; TNA E101/46/11; TNA E358/6 rot 6;
Cobyn John Esquire John Cobyn, esquire, is mentioned in relation to a court case on 22 November 1412 concerning a debt of £20, but there is no other surviving information about him. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 442 In 1415, John Corbyn indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/6/463;TNA E404/31/383; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8
Colchestre John Master Mason under investigation In 1415, John Colchestre indented to serve with three other master masons, John Benet, John Cliff and William Not, as well as a further 96 other unnamed masons. Given the nature of their trade they may have remained at Harfleur after its surrender but seems that at least some served at the battle since Not appears in the Agincourt roll. TNA E101/69/8/520 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Coll John Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, John Coll indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld and John Couper. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Colle Frederick Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Frederick Colle indented to serve with two other master gunners, Martin Van Oskest and Simon Dredric. Frederick Colle was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/515 (with 2 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Colnet Nicholas physician Colnet’s education at Merton College, Oxford where he was a fellow between 1398 and 1411, and experience may have commended him to royal service. He attended Henry V at least from Henry’s accession in 1413, for, designated as a clerk, he received a royal appointment that year to the living of the hospital of St Bartholomew, Playden by Rye, Sussex, and was described in July as king’s clerk, sergeant, and physician in a nomination for a pension from Bermondsey Priory, Surrey. In 1414 he received, at the petition of the king on behalf of his medicus, a seven-year papal dispensation from advancing to higher orders that allowed him to retain the income from his benefices—the parish church at Sutton Courtenay, Berkshire, and canonries and prebends at Sneating (St Paul’s, London) and Wisborough (Chichester). An indenture of 29 April 1415 records Colnet’s attendance on Henry V during the Agincourt campaign. It promises payment of 40 marks per annum for service in the duchy of Guyenne and 12 deniers per day should he enter the kingdom of France with Henry. He was to be provided with transport (horse, harness, and victuals), in addition to the company of three archers; in the event of an invasion of France, 100 marks would support thirty men-at-arms in his retinue. Colnet may well have treated Charles, duke of Orléans, after his capture by the English at Agincourt, for Colnet’s will includes the bequest of a ewer which he had received as a gift from the duke. Nicholas Colnet prepared his will before he again attended the king in France, in 1417, and died three years later, in November 1420. The will suggests that he was both prosperous and generous. Bequests total more than £115 in money, in addition to extensive gifts of plate, cloth, and jewellery. See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography In 1415, Nicholas Colnet indented to serve with 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E 101/69/4/381; TNA E404/31/359; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Compton John archer under investigation In 1415, John Compton indented to serve with seven other archers, Thomas Hervy, Thomas Ernysoy, Roger Martyn, Richard Hunt, John Base, William Clerk and William Starky. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/305 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Comube Laurence archer under investigation In 1415, Laurence Comube indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, William Petham, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Coneway John Esquire Likely of the Coneway family of Rhuddlan In 1415, John Coneway’s retinue consisted of himself and 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA C76/98 CHECK; TNA E404/31/380; TNA E101/45/5 m.8
Constantyne Robert yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Robert Constantyne indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Cook John Chaplain under investigation In 1415, John Cook indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Cookerham William yeoman peyntour under investigation In 1415, William Cookerham indented to serve with three other men, described as yeomen ‘peyntours’, William Seveburgh, John Duddyll and Thomas Pope. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Corbet Thomas Esquire The earliest evidence for Thomas Corbet, esquire, is on 17 June 1414, when his letter of protection for service in Picardy in the castle of Guínes in the company of the king’s brother, Thomas, duke of Clarence, was revocated because he delayed in the city of London, as certified by the sheriffs. The following year, on 10 January, he was described as a king’s esquire when Henry V granted him £10 from the issues of the county of Shropshire. Corbet evidently survived the Agincourt campaign as he was later granted an annuity of £12 by the king from the fee-farm of the manor of Forde in Shropshire. CPR 1413-1416, pp. 194, 383; 1416-1422, pp. 238, 336, 368 In 1415, Thomas Corbet indented to serve with four other esquires, Thomas Appulton, William Castellon, Thomas Mapurley, John Agarston and Thomas Corbet, each of which provide 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/447 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/287; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d; TNA E358/6 m. 7;
Cordwener John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Cordwener indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Cornwall John Knight John Cornwall was born no later than the mid-1370s, as he was a knight when he accompanied Richard II to his meeting with Charles VI of France at Ardres in 1396. Cornwall was retained by Richard II at an annual fee of 190 marks and joined the king on his 1399 campaign to Ireland. Following the accession of Henry IV to the throne, he made a highly advantageous marriage to the king’s sister, Elizabeth of Lancaster. He later served on campaigns to Scotland and Wales. In 1412 he was one of the principal commanders in the expedition to France led by the king’s son, Thomas, duke of Clarence. On the Agincourt campaign he was often used in reconnoitre and special manoevures. He served on the 1416 campaign and subsequently had a very distinguished career in the conquest of Normandy. In 1432 Cornwall was elevated to the peerage as Lord Fanhope, a title taken from a manor he owned in Herefordshire. He died on 11 December 1443. See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography In 1415, John Cornwall indented to serve with 29 men-at-arms and 90 archers, all of whom appear to have served at the battle. His retinue captured various prisoners, including the count of Vendome. 120 TNA C 76/98 m. 9; TNA E404/31/263; TNA E101/45/5 m4d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 2; Ag Roll
Couper John Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, John Couper indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Couper Robert archer under investigation In 1415, Robert Couper indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Couper William archer under investigation In 1415, William Couper indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Courtenay William Esquire A William Courtenay was a member of the family of the earls of Devon and may have been the man of that name who was MP for Somerset in 1455. On 17 November 1415 he was described as a king’s esquire when he was granted £40 per annum from the profits of the manors of Cadley and Coker, Somerset late of Richard Courtenay, bishop of Norwich, during the minority of Philip son and heir of John Courtenay, knight, brother and heir of the bishop. CPR 1413-1416, pp. 369, 383. In 1415, William Courtenay indented to serve with two other esquires, John Attilbrigge and William Marshall. They served with 3 archers each, a total of 9 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 12 TNA E101/69/365 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/341;TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Courtenay William Esquire A William Courtenay was a member of the family of the earls of Devon and may have been the man of that name who was MP for Somerset in 1455. On 17 November 1415 he was described as a king’s esquire when he was granted £40 per annum from the profits of the manors of Cadley and Coker, Somerset late of Richard Courtenay, bishop of Norwich, during the minority of Philip son and heir of John Courtenay, knight, brother and heir of the bishop. CPR 1413-1416, pp. 369, 383.under investigation In 1415, William Courtenay indented to serve with one other man-at-arms and six archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. (it is uncertain whether there are two William Courtenays who indent, or whether it is the same man indenting twice) TNA E404/31/; TNA E101/45/5 m.7d
Courtenay Edward Knight Born in 1388, the son of Edward Courtenay, 3rd earl of Devon and Maud de Camoys, he was knighted on 13 October 1399. He was one of the commissioners who tried the Southampton plotters and seems to have been particulatly close to Henry V on the expedition into Normandy in 1417. his career was cut short by his death at sea in August 1418. In 1415, Edward Courtenay indented to serve with 29 men-at-arms and 90 archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 120 TNA C 76/98 m. 20, 22; TNA E101/69/4/403; TNA E404/31/311; TNA E101/45/5 m3d
Couyn John Sergeant of the king’s tents and pavilions under investigation In 1415, John Couyn indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 29 TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Cowpere John Fletcher under investigation In 1415, John Cowpere indented to serve with five other fletchers, Robert Michell, William Hersegaunt, John Morys, Simon Chaunge and Robert Wayn. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/436 (with 5 others)
Croysier John archer under investigation In 1415, John Croysier indented to serve with nine other archers, Thomas Breuster, Richard Chircheman, Thomas Norton, Nicholas Fwy, William Buxton, John Porto, John Bolton, John Pilton and John Leche. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Cumpton Thomas Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Cumpton indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Curson William archer under investigation In 1415, William Curson indented to serve with five other men, all described as yeomen of the great wardrobe, Roger Holbeth, John Boston, Thomas Werkworth, Thomas White and Hugh Skynnier. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 (with 5 others)
Custance William archer under investigation In 1415, William Custance indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Cutteller William Master gunner under investigation In 1415, William Cutteller indented to serve with five other master gunners, Dederico Plomaker, Gerardo Van Vengarde, Dederico de Vere, Petro Clusman and Calis Van Rosty. William Cutteller was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle, but did serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/512 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9;
Dainet Thomas Chaplain under investigation In 1415, Thomas Dainet indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Dartas Janico Esquire Janico Dartas, esquire (d. 1426) hilaed from Navarre. He served in the garrison of Cherbourg for the English and subsequently in Calais and on Richard II’s expedition to Ireland in 1394. He also developed strong links with the earl of Northumberland and was active on the Scottish border. Though initially loyal to Richard II in 1399 and with him at his surrender, Dartas then became a loyal Lancastrian. in return he was given annuities as well lands and offices by Henry IV in Ireland. On 26 July 1415 was granted leave to remain in England yet to receive his annuities from Ireland. After the battle of Agincourt he joined the garrison of HArfleur. He also participated in the conquest of Normandy 1417-19 and was in France in 1421 before returning to Ireland. See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and S. Walker, ‘Janico Dartasso: chivalry, nationality and the man-at-arms’, History, new ser., 84 (1999), 31–51 · In 1415, Janico Dartas’s retinue consisted of himself, 9 other men-at-arms and 30 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 40 TNA C76/98 m. 12; TNA E101/69/3/370
Dauson John smith under investigation In 1415, John Dauson indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Richard Hodell, John Weble, John Heggeman, John Hille, Robert Preston, John Peche, John de Saint Albans, Thomas Buntyngford and John Shrowesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
de la Pole Michael jnr Knight banneret The eldest son of the earl of Suffolk, born in 1395, Michael indented to serve in 1415 in his own right as a knight. He became earl following his father’s death from dysentery at Harfleur on 17 September 1415. His family suffered a second misfortune as Michael fell at the battle. He was succeeded by his brother William (d. 1450) who was a member of his father’s retinue in 1415 and was invalided home from Harfleur. In 1415, Michael de la Pole indented to provide a retinue consisting of himself, 19 men-at-arms and 60 archers. Of these, 1 man-at-arms is known to have died at the siege, another was sent to England from Harfleur as a messenger while 19 other archers and 4 servants (garciones) were invalided home. A further 2 men-at-arms and 2 archers from de la Pole’s retinue were placed in the garrison at Harfleur. Return shipping was provided for 18 men-at-arms and 52 archers. Sir Michael became earl at the death of his father at the siege, but he was killed at the battle, at which he had at least 70 men under his command. One of his archers John Killebury captured a prisoner at the battle worth £6. 80 TNA C 76/98 m. 9; TNA E101/69/5/421 ; TNA E101/45/5 m3; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/46/24; TNA E 358/6 rot 2;
de la Strade Gerard archer under investigation In 1415, Gerard de la Strade, described as a groom of the royal horses, indented to serve as an archer, but nothing further is known about his service. He may have been at the battle. 1 TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
de Saint Albans John smith under investigation In 1415, John de Saint Albans indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Richard Hodell, John Weble, John Heggeman, John Dauson, John Hille, Robert Preston, John Peche, Thomas Buntyngford and John Shrowesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
de Vere Dederico Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Dederico de Vere indented to serve with five other master gunners, Dederico Plomaker, Gerardo Van Vengarde, William Cutteller, Petro Clusman and Calis Van Rosty. Dederico de Vere was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/512 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Dederick Nicholas Armourer under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Dederick indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Dederyck Long Armourer under investigation In 1415, Long Deryck indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d; TNA E358/6 m. 7;
Delyngham John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Delyngham indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Dent John archer On April 7 1414, John was granted, along with another household servant, Alex Smetheley (also employed as an archer in 1415) the goods of Richard Watton of Wyndesore, chaplain, to the value of 25 marks within the counties of Berks and Buckingham, forfeited to the king because he had killed Robert Spandon of the same town, chaplain, and fled. John was described as being dead by 22 January 1417. CPR 1413-6, pp. 201,252; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 60 In 1415, John Dent indented to serve as an archer with three others, Richard Lavender, William Lavender and John Hall who were each paid £6.13.4 to serve as archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with three others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Desye John Clerk of the bakehouse under investigation In 1415, John Desye indented to serve with three other clerks, John Hanham, William Sharpton and John Breton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E404/31/361
Devereux John knight It is possible – based on the ratio of troops – that Devereux was from Gascony but a family of that name also lived on the Welsh borders (there is a place called St Devereux 6 miles south of Hereford). A John Devereux was a younger son of Sir Walter Devereux (d. 1402) According to BL Sloane 4600 printed in Nicolas History of the battle of Agincourt p 378 Devereux indented for 250 men at arms and 250 archers. The original documentation has not so far been discovered. The ratio looks more like that common in Gascony. 500 Nicolas, History of the Battle of Agincourt (third edn, 1833), p. 378.
Dew Philip labourer under investigation In 1415, Philip Dew indented to serve with three other named labourers, David Clere, John Ducas and Reynold John, as well as a further 116 other unnamed labourers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/8/517 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Dorset Thomas Beaufort, earl of earl Born around 1377 as the youngest of three illegitimate sons of John of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford, Thomas served with the young Prince Henry in Wales and as Admiral of the North from 1404. He was created earl of Dorset on 5 July 1412 and on Henry V’s accession in 1413, he was appointed lieutenant of Aquitaine. He was recalled in July 1414 and was a member of the embassy sent to Paris in early 1415. He was responsible for gathering Henry’s fleet at Southampton and was placed in command of Harfleur after its surrender on 22 September. He was made duke of Exeter on 18 November 1416 and after Henry V’s death was governor of the infant Henry VI. He died in 1426. Dorset’s retinue consisted of the earl himself, 1 banneret, 6 knights, 92 men-at-arms and 300 archers, all of whom were mounted. There is no evidence of any of his men being invalided home or serving at the battle, and we must assume that all entered the garrison of Harfleur with him. He was not at the battle. 400 TNA C76/98 m. 14; TNA E404/31/278; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1
Dredric Simon Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Simon Dredric indented to serve with two other master gunners, Martin Van Oskest and Frederick Colle. Simon Dredric was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/515 9( with 2 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Ducas John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Ducas indented to serve with three other named labourers, David Clere, Philip Dew and Reynold John, as well as a further 116 other unnamed labourers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/8/517 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Duddyll John yeoman peyntour under investigation In 1415, John Duddyll indented to serve with three other men, described as yeomen ‘peyntours’, William Seveburgh, William Cookerham and Thomas Pope. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Dutton Thomas Knight Little is known about Thomas Dutton. In December 1412 he was named as an esquire of the king, but by April of the following year was called a knight. He was later described as a king’s knight and was granted £40 yearly from the petty customs of the port of London in January 1415. In June of the same year, he was given the wardship of the heir of the lands of Hugh le Venables of Kynderton in the county of Chester. Dutton possibly died during the Agincourt campaign, as he was described as deceased by January 1416. In 1415, Thomas Dutton indented to serve with 9 men-at-arms and 30 archers. One man-at-arms and two archers were killed during the siege of Harfleur. The remainder served at the battle. It is likely that Dutton died during or shortly after the campaign. 40 TNA E101/69/5/415; TNA E404/31/248; TNA E101/45/5 m.4; TNA E101/45/21, m. 8; TNA E101/45/1
Dykon Henry archer under investigation In 1415, Henry Dykon indented to serve with two other archers, Richard Ferrour and William Flore. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/327 (with 2 others)
Eggesley Adam archer under investigation In 1415, Adam Eggesley indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Elham John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Elham indented to serve with three other esquires, James Blount, Richard Etton and William Blakbone, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/216 (with three others);TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Ely John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Ely indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Elys John archer under investigation In 1415, John Elys indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, Richard Marchant, John Kerby, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 18 (in Clarence’s retinue); TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d;
Ernysoy Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Ernysoy indented to serve with seven other archers, Thomas Hervy, Roger Martyn, Richard Hunt, John Base, John Compton, William Clerk and William Starky. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/305 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Erpingham Thomas Knight banneret Thomas Erpingham was born around 1355-7 into an established East Anglian gentry family. His long military career began in 1368 when he joined the service of Edward the Black Prince. By 1372 he had been knighted when he took part in a naval campaign of the same year. In 1379 he served in the Calais garrison and became a retainer of John of Gaunt, at an annual fee of £20 in peace and 50 marks in war. He accompanied Gaunt in 1385 on the Scottish expedition and to Castile the following year. Erpingham subsequently became a part of the household of Henry Bolingbroke, earl of Derby, and served in the latter’s expedition to Prussia. Following the accession of Bolingbroke to the throne, Erpingham was rewarded for his loyalty, which included appointments as constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports as well chamberlain of the royal household. In the reign of Henry V he was appointed steward of the royal household and played a prominent role in the expedition of 1415. He served on the 1416 campaign to rescue Harfleur but did not join the king’s second expedition to France in 1417, however, and resigned his office of steward the same year. He died on 27 June 1428. See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. In 1415, Thomas Erpingham indented to serve with two other knights, 17 men-at-arms and 60 archers. Through a study of the muster made at embarkation and the retinue roll presented in the accounting process, we can see that other men were added to his retinue during the campaign. Three of the men-at-arms (including two knighted at the landing at the Chef de Caux) and three of the archers were invalided home after the siege, where two other archers died. Erpingham was present at the battle with 74 of his men (Burgundian chroniclers claim he gave the signal for the attack to begin, but there is no certain evidence he was in command of Henry’s archers). One archer subsequently died at Calais. 80 TNA C 76/98 m. 11; TNA E101/69/3/360; TNA E404/31/156; TNA E101/45/5 m1; TNA E101/45/22, m. 2; TNA E101/44/30 no. 3; TNA E101/47/20; Ag Roll; ADD
Esmond John Esquire John Esmond was granted an annuity of £20 by Henry IV on 29 September 1408, which was subsequently confirmed by Henry V on 12 June 1413. He was subsequently knighted during or after the Agincourt campaign but had died by 12 November 1416. CPR 1413-1416, ??, CPR 1416-1422, pp. 54 In 1415, John Esmond’s retinue consisted of himself, a man-at-arms and 6 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA C76/98 m. 20; TNA E404/31/238; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4.; TNA E101/46/2
Eston Thomas Esquire unlikely to be MP of this name who was mayor of Exeter in 1415 In 1415, John Eston indented to serve with 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E404/31/438; TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Etton Richard Esquire under investigation In 1415, Richard Etton indented to serve with three other esquires, James Blount, John Elham and William Blakbone, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/45/5 m. 2 (with 3 others); TNA E404/31/216
Everard Lawrence Esquire Lawrence Everard is first mentioned on 13 November 1408 when he was described as a king’s esquire when he was given the petty custom of the water of Berwyk (upon Tweed?) and the tool of the same town. He was subsequently given an annuity of 10 marks from the issues of the county of Devon on 12 January 1408, which was confirmed by Henry V on 12 June 1413. He survived the Agincourt campaign as the king granted him £10 yearly from the farm of £20 from various lands held by the abbot and convent of Oseneye in Oxfordshire. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 230; CPR 1413-6, pp. 25, 397 In 1415, Lawrence Everard indented to serve with three archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E101/69/3/372; TNA E404/31/157;
Everdon John clerk On 8 March 1410 John Everdon, clerk, was recorded as having a tenement in London near to the Temple. Four years later he was described as an auditor of the accounts of the Exchequer when appointed to audit the accounts of chamberlains and other officials in South Wales. He is subsequently recorded as having been involved in assigning certain royal customs revenues to meet the arrears of ship masters and their crews which participated in the Agincourt campaign in October and November of 1415, including the Mary of Bryggewater, the Trinite of Hull and the Nicollas of Hull. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 171; CPR 1413-6, pp. 269, 370, 377, 382 In 1415, John Everdon indented to serve with two other clerks and four archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA C76/98 m. 15; TNA E101/69/8/513; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d
Ewayn John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Ewayn indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Ewell John archer under investigation In 1415, John Ewell indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Fance William yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, William Fance indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Fastolf John Esquire John Fastolf (1380-1459) was born into a minor gentry family from Norfolk and had a very lengthy career in the French wars. He began military service in Ireland and then Aquitaine under Thomas, duke of Clarence. Although invalided home after the siwege of Harfleur, he was in garrison there ealry in 1416 and gained a strong reputation as well as a knighthood and a land grant. Over the following twenty years he held many captaincies in France, including that of the Bastille in Paris, and was particularly associated with the expansion into Maine and with the duke of Bedford. He was made KG in 1426 but later accused of cowardice by John, lord Talbot at the battle of Patay in 1429. He retired to England in the late 1430s and is also significant for the circle around him, which included authors of a chronicle of the wars in France 1415 to 1429in College of Arms MS M9. See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. In 1415, John Fastolf’s retinue consisted of himself, 9 other men-at-arms and 30 archers. He was invalided home from Harfleur. 40 TNA C76/98 m. 15, 17; TNA E404/31/405; TNA E101/45/5 m.8d; TNA E101/44/30 no. 2
Fawconer Thomas cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, Thomas Fawconer indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Felbrigg Simon Knight Sir Simon Felbrigg (b. 1350) was a standard bearer to Richard II and one of the knights of his chamber. In the reign of Henry IV he was appointed to numerous commissions in the county of Norfolk. He also served on the 1416 campaign to rescue HArfleur but it is not clear what military service if any he paid thereafter. He appears to have provided good service for Henry V as he was later made a Knight of the Garter in 1422. He made his will on 21 Sept 1442 and died on 3 December 1442. In 1415, Sir Simon Felbrigg indented to serve with 11 men-at-arms and 36 archers. One man-at-arms was killed at the siege of Harfleur with a further five invalided back to England. He was present at the Battle of Agincourt with five men-at-arms and 36 archers. 48 TNA E 101/69/3/362; TNA E404/31/230; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1; TNA E101/45/21, m. 25; TNA E101/45/3; TNA E 358/6 rot 5d;
Feriby John Clerk of the wardrobe under investigation In 1415, John Feriby indented to serve with six other men, Stephen Payne, William Balne, Thomas Morton, Walter Burton, John Langville and Robert Castel, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/5/412 (with 6 others); TNA E404/31/415 (with 6 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Ferro William archer under investigation In 1415, William Ferro indented to serve with two other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Thomas Smith and Richard May. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others)
Ferrour Richard archer under investigation In 1415, Richard Ferrour indented to serve with two other archers, William Flore and Henry Dykon. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/327
Ferrour Stephen Esquire under investigation In 1415, Stephen Ferrour indented to serve with two other esquires, John Ryder and Robert Hunt, each of which provide 3 archers. photos for cadets. Not likely to be a large cost. TNA E101/69/6/452 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/306; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Fiennes Roger Knight Roger Fiennes was born on 14 September 1384 in Herstmonceux, Sussex, to a prominent family of Norman descent. In 1412 Fiennes served in the duke of Clarence’s expedition to France and was knighted the same year. Following the 1415 campaign, he was made a King’s Knight and was retained at an annual fee of £40. He served on the 1416 campaign to rescue HArfleur. On Henry V’s second expedition to France in 1417, Fiennes indented to serve with nine men-at-arms and 30 archers. After the death of Henry V, he continued to serve in military expeditions to France. His military service resulted in the grants of lands in Normandy and offices in England. In 1439 he became Treasurer of the Household of the king and later served as a member of parliament in 1439-40, 1442 and 1445-6. He died in 1449. In 1415, Roger Fiennes indented to serve with seven men-at-arms and 24 archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 32 TNA E101/69/6/454; TNA E404/31/264; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d
Filongley Henry Esquire In 1400 a Richard Filongley, most probably Henry’s father, was retained by Henry IV as an esquire for £20 annually. This Richard was dead by 28 February 1416 and it seems probable that this Henry was his son and that he and Richard Filongley, very probably his brother, who also indented directly with the crown in 1415 were raised in the royal household. A Henry Filongley was MP for Weymouth, Dorset in 1449 and for Warwickshire in 1453. It is possible that this was the same man (or a son?). In 1415, Henry Filongley indented to serve with four other esquires, John Selby, Bertram France, William Brancepath and Robert Brut. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/455;TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; TNA E404/31/304; TNA E101/46/32
Filongley Richard yeoman of the household A valettus of the scullery, on 28 May 1415, Richard was commissioned, for half a year, to ‘take coals, wood, bowls, pots, vessels and all other things necessary for the office of the scullery of the household and carpenters, labourers, horses and carriage as needed’ with John Philips, John Walsh, Thomas Swetenham, John Spaldyng and William Sharperton (REF). This apparently lowly function does not necessarily indicate low status. In 1400 a Richard Filongley, most probably this Richard’s father, was retained by Henry IV as an esquire for £20 annually (CPR Hen V vol. 1 p. 311. Ibid. p. 78). This Richard was dead by 28 February 1416 and it seems probable that this Richard was his son and that he and Henry Filongley, very probably Richard’s brother, who also indented directly with the crown in 1415 were raised in the royal household. The village of Filongley lies in Warwks. In 1415, Richard Filongley, valettus, indented directly with the crown with Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere, Gregory Scalder, William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Fitzharry William Esquire On 26 February 1414 a grant for life was given to the king’s esquire William Fitz Henry of £20 yearly from the fee-farm of the priory of Coventry called ‘Erlespart’. CPR 1413-1416, p. 172. In 1415, William FitzHarry indented to serve with four other esquires, Robert Gloucestre, Thomas Staunton, John Folville and William Hodilston, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/471; TNA E404/31/292; TNA E358/6 (with two others)
Fitzhugh Henry, lord baron Henry (b. 1363) had his seat at Ravensworth Castle in north Yorkshire. He was very close to Henry V, serving as the king’s chamberlain and on all the campaigns in Normandy where he was a leading negotiator at sieges. In 1416 he was appointed treasurer of England, holding the post until 1421. He was an executor of Henry V’s will and later a member of the council during the minority of Henry VI. A characteristic of Fitzhugh’s life was religious devotion. In 1408, he joined a crusade to Prussia and later went to the Levant, and was an enthusiast for the Brigettine order, influencing Henry V’s decision to found a house of that order at Syon. He was buried at the Cistercian abbey of Jervaulx, Yorkshire following his death on 11 January 1425. FitzHugh’s retinue consisted of himself, 3 knights, 26 men-at-arms and 90 archers. Of these, 7 esquires were invalided home from Harfleur, each with a servant, and 13 archers. The rest, with Fitzhugh himself, were at the battle. 120 TNA E 404/31/279; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 11; Ag Roll
Fletcher Geoffrey Labourer under investigation In 1415, Geoffrey Fletcher indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Fletcher John Armourer under investigation In 1415, John Fletcher indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Flete John wheelwright under investigation In 1415, John Flete indented to serve with five other archers, all wheelwrights in the royal household, Robert Lety, Walter Wheller, Thomas Wheller, John Blakeman and Thomas Leycestre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 6 TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Flore William archer under investigation In 1415, William Flore indented to serve with two other archers, Richard Ferrour and Henry Dykon. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/327
Folville John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Folville indented to serve with four other esquires, Robert Gloucestre, Thomas Staunton, William FitzHarry and William Hodilston, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/471; TNA E404/31/292
Forfoye Richard Labourer under investigation In 1415, Richard Forfoye indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Foulere Thomas yeoman of the household Thomas Foulere appears to have been a fowler, as he was commissioned to take partridges for the royal household on 21 November 1411, 5 October 1412, 17 November 1413 and 16 September 1414. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 347, 437; CPR 1413-1416, pp. 134, 233 In 1415, Thomas Foulere and another man, Roger Hertishull, both described as ‘valettus’ of the royal household indented to serve as archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 2 TNA E404/31/158; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d
Fowler Henry Esquire Henry Fowler, esquire, was given a daily grant of 2d daily by Henry IV on 25 May 1400 and subsequently £20 per annum on 10 January 1409; both of these grants were confirmed by Henry V on 2 October. By October of 1409 he was described as serjeant of the office of the larder for the king’s household, when he was permitted to retain his fees and wages of office along with Easter and Christmas gifts whilst away on pilgrimage to the Holy Land ‘for the convalescence and health of the king’s person and for the safety of his own soul’. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 81, 113 In 1415, Henry Fowler indented to serve with another esquire of the household, John Rassh. John provided 3 archers whereas Henry contributed a further 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 19, 20; TNA E101/69/4/406 (with Thom. as Rassh); TNA E404/31/342
Fowler Thomas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Thomas Fowler indented to serve with another man-at-arms, John Bank, with each man providing 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/323(with John Bank); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5
Fox Lowys Armourer under investigation In 1415, Lowys Fox indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, William Butte, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
France Bertram Esquire A king’s esquire, and likely a Gascon, on 1 October 1413, he was granted 10 marks yearly from the fee farm of Northampton in lieu of the office of Balli of Poulihon, in the duchy of Aquitaine. CPR 1413-1416, p. 98. In 1415, Bertram France indented to serve with four other esquires, John Selby, Henry Filongley, William Brancepath and Robert Brut. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/455; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; TNA E101/46/32; TNA E404/31/304
Frensshe Stephen archer under investigation In 1415, Stephen Frensshe indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, William Petham, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Frost Nicholas Bowyer under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Frost indented to serve with four other bowyers, William Burton, William Swettoke, Robert Gyldeford and Thomas Shoylford. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 5 TNA E404/31/342; TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Fwy Nicholas archer under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Fwy indented to serve with nine other archers, Thomas Breuster, Richard Chircheman, Thomas Norton, William Buxton, John Porto, John Bolton, John Croysier, John Pilton and John Leche. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Fysshe Thomas Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Fysshe indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 20 TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Gamesley William archer under investigation In 1415, William Gamesley indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Gamme David Esquire Gamme was a famous casualty of the battle. He descended from the Welsh rulers of Brycheiniog. His father gave loyal service to the Bohun earls of Hereford. Gamme followed in this tradition with loyalty to the inheritors of the lordship of Brecon, Henry Bolingbroke, the future Henry IV, through his marriage to Mary de Bohun. Gamme was in Bolingbroke’s service in the 1390s, gained annuities from him as king, and remained loyal during the Welsh wars. He was captured by Glyn Dwr’s supporters but assisted by Henry IV in paying his ransom. The story of his death in the battle gained much in the telling. in reality we know nothing aobut how he died or why the chroniclers single him out for specific mention in the list of dead. See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography In 1415, Dafydd Gam’s retinue consisted of himself and three archers who, despite frequent statements to the contrary, are not named in the surviving documents. Dafydd is known to have died at the battle but the fate of his archers, and their identities, are unknown. 4 TNA E101/69/4/404; TNA E404/31/362; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5
Gardemewe Richard Esquire Richard Gardemew was described as a king’s esquire on 18 February 1415, when he was granted a messuage and five shops in the parish of St Denis Backchurch (on the junction of what is now Lime Street and Fenchurch Street, rebuilt after the Great Fire but demolished 1878) in the ward of Langbourne, London forfeited by James Knight, brewer, born in Flanders, to the value of £10 yearly answering for any surplus. CPR 1413-1416, p. 282. In 1415, Richard Gardemew indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/4/392; TNA E404/31/392; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d
Gascoyn Peter Master gunner under investigation Peter Gascoyn was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle, but did serve in the garrison of the town. 3 TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Geddefere Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Geddefere indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Gerard Laurence Esquire under investigation In 1415, Laurence Gerard’s retinue consisted of himself and 3 mounted archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/3/372; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Gerardesson William Master gunner under investigation In 1415, William Gerardesson indented to serve with five other master gunners, Walter Slotmaker, Godfrey Goykyn, Dederico Van Hesill, Arnold Skade and Dirk Bokelmaker. William Gerardsson was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. 18 TNA E101/69/8/511 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Gilder Philip archer under investigation In 1415, Philip Gilder indented to serve with four other archers, John Weddesbury, William Thornton, John Hemyngburgh and Robert Killesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/399 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d
Glasyer John yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, John Glasyer indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Gloucester Humphrey, duke of duke Humphrey (b. 1390) was the youngest brother of Henry V. He was wounded at the battle and his life was saved by Henry V in person. He participated in the conquest of Normandy. His most important role, however, came after his brother’s death as protector of the realm for the young Henry VI and in the political struggles that followed. Despite claims that he was murdered, it is probable that Humphrey was victim of a stroke which occurred shortly after being accused of treason at the parliament held at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk in early 1447. His tomb, made before his death, survives next to the shrine of the saint, in St. Alban’s Cathedrale. Gloucester’s 800-strong retinue in 1415 was the second largest after that of his elder brother, the duke of Clarence, reflecting his status. It consisted of the duke himself, 6 knights, 193 men-at-arms and 600 archers although he may have had a shortfall of four men-at-arms. In the post campaign accounting, wages for 5 knights, 61 men-at-arms and 211 archers for 49 days were deducted, suggesting they had been lost in some way during the campaign, but we cannot know whether they died, were invalided home, or were killed or taken prisoner on the march. Sick lists indicate that 208 men from Gloucester’s company, but not all soldiers since some were described as servants, were invalided home from Harfleur. HIs retinue at the battle consisted of at least himself, 1 knight, 125 men-at-arms and 380 archers, a minimum of 507 men. Two prisoners were captured by men of his retinue, worth slightly over £58 in ransoms. 800 TNA E 404/31/250; TNA E101/45/5 m.5; TNA E101/45/13; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1, m.2-5; E358/6 rot 4; Ag Roll
Gloucestre Robert Esquire Robert Gloucester was described as a king’s esquire on 1 October 1413 when he was given an annuity of £20 for the issues of the county of Kent. He was later appointed as office of the marshal of the King’s Bench on 24 May 1417. CPR 1413, p. 102; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 45, 110 In 1415, Robert Gloucestre indented to serve with four other esquires, Thomas Staunton, William FitzHarry, John Folville and William Hodilston, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 20 TNA E101/69/5/471 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/292; TNA E101/45/5 m.2; TNA E358/6
Golcok Robert Labourer under investigation In 1415, Robert Golcok indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Goldebone Richard cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, Richard Goldebone indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Goldsmyth Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Goldsmyth indented to serve with seven other men, described as yeomen of the bakehouse, Nicholas Burcestre, Ralph Morley, Henry Wendone, John Keynesham, John Carpenter, Robert Mason and John Mason. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/410 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Goldsmyth Thomas Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Goldsmyth indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Goykyn Godfrey Master gunner Godfrey Goykyn appears to have been of Dutch or German descent based on his name, after the Agincourt campaign he served in the garrison of Calais and later took part in the 1428 expedition to France. In 1415, Godfrey Goykyn indented to serve with five other master gunners, William Gerardesson, Walter Slotmaker, Dederico Van Hesill, Arnold Skade and Dirk Bokelmaker. Godfrey Goykyn was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/511 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9;
Graa John Esquire possibly son of Sir Thomas Graa (d. 1405) MP for Lincolnshire, 1422. knighted later himself. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Graa’s retinue consisted of himself, one other man-at-arms and 3 archers. Unfortunately, the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. 5 TNA E101/69/3/375; TNA E404/31/379; TNA E101/45/5 m.8d;
Grauntson William Knight biography to complete In 1415, Sir William Grauntson indented to serve with one man-at-arms and six archers. He and his retinue did not serve at the Battle of Agincourt as they were placed in the garrison of Harfleur on 22 September. They were later shipped back to England from Calais with 16 horses. 8 TNA E404/31/288; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6; TNA E101/45/21, mm. 3, 16; TNA E101/44/30 no 2. m. 3; TNA E101/46/18; TNA E 358/6 rot 8;
Gray Andrew Esquire under investigation In 1415, Andrew Grey indented to serve with another esquire, William Pope. Their retinue consisted of themselves and 6 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/462 (with William. Pope); TNA E404/31/289; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4
Grene William archer, storekeeper (gerneter) under investigation In 1415, William Grene indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Medway, William Hether, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 12 TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Grese William archer William Crese was described as Yeoman usher to the king’s hall in a commission to fetch wood and other necessaries to the king’s hall 28 May 1415. Described as a ‘king’s servant’, in 1415, he was in receipt of 26s 8d yearly from the revenues of the exchequer of North Wales at Caernarfon, which confirmed a grant made on 22 March 1413. CPR 1413-1416, pp. 169, 184, 330 In 1415, William Gryse indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, Richard Marchant, John Kerby, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/101/45/5 m. 6d (with 11 others); TNA E404/31/326
Gresley John Knight John Gresley was the eldest son of Thomas Gresley ( d. 1445). In about 1409 John married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Clarell of Tickhill and Aldwark in Yorkshire. Gresley received the patronage of John, duke of Bedford, and later became lieutenant in Rouen. He was elected as MP for Staffordshire in 1422. He died in 1450. In 1415, John Gresley indented to serve with one man-at-arms and six archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 8 TNA C 76/98 m. 15; TNA E101/69/5/436; TNA E404/31/328; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6.
Gresley Thomas Knight Thomas Gresley was one of the richest and most powerful landowners in Derbyshire, with further estates in Staffordshire and Lincolnshire. He was one of the Staffordshire gentry who joined Henry Bolingbroke, earl of Derby, on his landing at Ravenspur in 1399, and was a knight by October of that year. In the following year he received an annuity of £26 payable for life from the Duchy of Lancaster. He played an important role in the administration of the north Midlands, serving on numerous royal commissions and was elected to parliament on six occasions. After 1427 he took very little part in public life and died in September 1445. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Thomas Gresley indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. In the absence of evidence to the contray we can assume they were all at the battle. 12 TNA C 76/98 m. 15; TNA E404/31/223; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6; Ag Roll
Grey of Heton John Knight Born 1384/91, John was the second son of Sr Thomas Grey, a Northumberland knight. He served in the wars in Wales and was closely associated with Prince Henry, receiving an annunity from him in 1408 and serving in the force which the prince sent under Thomas, earl of Arundel to assist the duke of Burgundy in 1411. He was knighted at the coronation and served on the 1416 expediton and in the conquest of Normandy, receiving offices and lands in the duchy from Henry V, and being created comte de Tancarville in 1419. He died at the battle of Bauge in 1421. See Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. In 1415, John Grey indented to serve with nineteen men-at-arms and 60 archers. All appear to have been at the battle. John was one of a group of trusted knights used to reconnoitre immediately after the landing. The count of Eu may have been captured by men of his retinue at the battle. 80 TNA E101/45/5 m. 2d
Grey of Heton Thomas Knight Thomas (b. by 1384) was the eldest son of Sir Thomas Grey (d. 1400), a Northumberland knight. In 1404 he was retained for life by Ralph Neville, earl of Northumberland but entered the service of henry prince of Wales in 1408. In 1412 he married his son Thomas to the daughter of Richard of Conisborough (the future Earl of Cambridge). he was involved with Cambridge in the Southampton plot and was sentenced to death on 2 August 1415. In 1415, Thomas Grey indented to serve with 23 men-at-arms and 48 archers. Despite his execution before the campaign embarked it is likely that his retinue continued to serve, perhaps being linked to that of his brother Sir John. 72 TNA C 76/98 m. 19; TNA E404/31/356; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Grey of Ruthin John Knight John Grey (b. 1387) was the son and heir of the third lord of Ruthin, Reynold Grey (1362-1440). By 1413 he was married to Constance, daughter of joh of Gaunt’s daughter Elizabeth and John Holland, duke of Exter. He served on later expeditions to France, becoming captain of Gournay. Grey was created a Knight of the Garter in 1436 and died in 1439, a year before his father. In 1415, Sir John Grey of Ruthin indented to serve with fourteen men-at-arms and 45 archers. Its seems that five of his men-at-arms and 8 of his archers may have been invalided home. He does not seem to have been present at the Battle of Agincourt, although nine of the men-at-arms and 37 of his archers were. It is possible therefore that he too was invalided home. After the battle 47 men with 96 horses were shipped from Calais to England. 60 TNA E404/31/159; TNA E101/45/5/ m.4d; TNA E101/45/22, m. 38; TNA E101/45/18; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/47/17; TNA E 358/6 rot 6; Ag Roll
Greyndor John Knight John Greyndore (b. 1356) of Abenhall, Gloucestershire, was an important figure in the southern Welsh marches. He accompanied Richard II to Ireland in 1394 and by April 1398 had been knighted. Greyndore rose to prominence after the accession of Henry IV. By October 1399 he was described as a King’s Knight and three months later was appointed sheriff of Glamorgan. He served in Henry IV’s Scottish expedition in 1400 and in the wars in Wales, serving also as an MP for Herefordshire. He fought at Shrewsbury alongside Pirnce Henry and was with him at the siege of Aberystwyth Castle in 1407. At the beginning of the reign of Henry V, he was appointed steward and constable of Monmouth and the Three Castles together with a life annuity of £64. He was dead by September 1416. seewww.historyofparliamentonline.org John Greyndor indented to serve with nine men-at-arms and 30 archers, in addition to 120 miners from the Forest of Dean under his command. After the siege of Harfleur he and his troops joined the garrison there under the command of Thomas, Earl of Dorset. 40 TNA C 76/98 m. 15; TNA E101/69/7/483: TNA E404/31/381, 386; TNA E101/45/5 m8d; TNA E101/45/20, m. 20;
Gyldeford Robert Bowyer under investigation In 1415, Robert Gyldeford indented to serve with four other bowyers, Nicholas Frost, William Burton, William Swettoke and Thomas Shoylford. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/432
Gyles Thomas Chaplain under investigation In 1415, Thomas Gyles indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Hall John archer John Hall from Sussex was given a daily grant of 6d a day by Richard II on 1 July 1398, which was confirmed by Henry IV on 7 November 1409. In the following year a writ of aid was given for John Hall ‘the younger’ and James Knottesford, whom Thomas Chaucer, chief butler, had appointed as his deputies in all ports from Withering to Romeney on 19 April 1410. Various commissions were held by John Hall ‘the elder’ from 1410 to 1412, mainly to investigate the value of lands held by landowners after their deaths. On 12 November 1413, John Halle ‘the younger’ was given a licence, along with nine other men to enclose a way leading through the middle of their park of Herset Mounceaux for the enlargement of the park, with replacement paths made on the northern and western edges. John Hall ‘the elder’ served as a commissioner of the peace for Sussex on 21 March and 16 November 1413, whereas John Hall ‘the younger’ was a commissioner of array for Sussex on 29 May 1415. John Hall ‘the younger’ was later appointed to various commissions a commission to repair sea defences in Sussex and Kent in 1418 and 1421. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 110, 124, 144, 177, 190, 243,284, 309, 312,329, 407, 413,430, 454,473; CPR 1413-16, pp. 133, 408,424; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 103, 137, 250, 272, 289, 291,329, 332, 388, 389, 460 In 1415, John Hall indented to serve as an archer with three other archers, Richard Lavender, William Lavender and John Dent who were each paid £6.13.4 for the first quarter years’ service. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E404/31/326 (with three others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Hals Richard clerk Richard Hals, clerk, was engaged in mission to Brittany on 26 June 1414 and served on a commission of oyer and terminer in February in 1415 related to the compensation of an English merchant for losses most likely suffered at sea by Breton pirates. CPR 1413-1416, pp. 221, 224 In 1415, Richard Hals indented to serve with two other men (most likely clerks), but unfortunately, the surviving documents can tell us nothing more about their service. 3 TNA E404/31/406; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Halsam Richard Esquire under investigation In 1415, Richard Halsam’s retinue consisted of himself and 3 mounted archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E404/31/160; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; TNA E101/47/34
Hampton Thomas yeoman of the household A Thomas Hampton, clerk, is mentioned in relation to the manor of Kyngesham in Sussex in June 1414. CPR 1413-16, p. 199 n 1415, Thomas Hampton indented to serve with William Bangor, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Tunbrigge, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille, Roger Semper, and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5/m. 3;
Hanham John Clerk of the poultry under investigation In 1415, John Hanham indented to serve with three other clerks, John Desye, William Sharpton and John Breton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/361 (with 3 others)
Hardyng John Cellarer under investigation In 1415, John Hardyng indented to serve with three other men, described as ‘cellarers’, Richard Beure, John Carbrok and Edward Sadeler. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others)
Harewode Nicholas archer under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Harewode, described as a clerk of the stables, indented to serve as an archer. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 1 TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Hargrove John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Hargrove indented to serve with three other esquires, William Hargrove, Giles Thorndon and Thomas Scarlet. Each provided 3 archers but the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. TNA C76/98 m. 19A, 14; TNA E101/69/4/377 (with 3 others); TNA E404/31/293; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Hargrove William Esquire under investigation In 1415, William Hargrove indented to serve with three other esquires, John Hargrove, Giles Thorndon and Thomas Scarlet. Each provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 16 TNA C76/98 m. 19A, 14; TNA E101/69/4/377 (with 3 others); TNA E404/31/293; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Harrington John, lord baron John, lord Harrington (b. 1384) , married Elizabeth, the daughter of Edward Courtenay, earl of Devon, increasing his, and his family’s fortunes. John accompanied Henry V on his French campaign in 1415, but was among those invalided home from Harfleur. In June 1417 he made his will, as part of his preparations for returning to France, and it was presumably on campaign that he died, childless, on 11 February 1418. He has a fine alabaster tomb at Porlock in north Devon. Harrington’s retinue in 1415 consisted of himself, 3 knights, 26 men-at-arms and 90 archers. Harrington was invalided home from Harfleur, together with 2 of his knights, 8 men-at arms, 20 archers and a further 18 men not included in his military retinue. Despite his absence, the remainder of his original retinue, 21 men-at-arms and 74 archers fought at the battle. 120 TNA C76/98 m. 15; TNA E404/31/161; TNA E101/45/5 m3; TNA E101/45/21 m. 12; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 13; TNA E101/46/1; TNA E101/47/33; E358/6 rot. 5; Ag Roll
Harrington James Knight James Harrington (d. 1417) hailed from Fishwick, Lancashire, the county for which he was MP in 1404. Like all his family he was strongly committed to the Lancastrian house, being granted a life annuity by Henry IV in November 1401 of £20 per annum, and being knighted after good service at the battle of Shrewsbury. He married the daughter of Sir Robert Urswyk, also stronlgy connected with the house of Lancaster. He served on the 1416 campaign to rescue Harfleur, and on the expedition of 1417 with 84 men and commanded the 400 archers from Lancashire on that occasion. He was wounded in the assault on Caen in September 1417 and died as a result. see ww.historyof parliamentonline.org In 1415, James Harrington indented to serve with nine men-at-arms and 30 archers. The records of the city of Salisbury reveal a fracas with his men as they passed by towards Southampton.Two archers were killed during the siege of Harfleur, with another archer subsequently placed in the garrison there. James Harrington was not present at Agincourt, as he was invalided home from Harfleur together with one man-at-arms. 38 men were present at the battle, with 34 of these men later shipped from Calais to England with 39 horses. 40 TNA E101/69/3/361; TNA E404/31/302; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d; TNA E101/47/32; TNA E 358/6 rot 9;
Harrington William Knight William Harrington’s father, Sir Nicholas Harrington (d. 1404) of Farleton and Hornby, Lincolnshire, was a supporter of John of Gaunt. William continued this tradition through service with the future Henry V. After the latter’s accession to the throne, he was a king’s knight, and a knight of the Garter in 1417. He served on the 1416 campaign to rescue Harfleur and on Henry V’s campaigns to conquer Normandy, being seriously wounded at the siege of Rouen. Harrington played an important role in Yorkshire affairs, serving as sheriff four times from 1408, and was appointed chief steward of the northern areas of the duchy of Lancaster in 1428. He died in 1440. See the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. In 1415, Sir William Harrington indented to serve with nine men-at-arms and 30 archers. One man-at-arms, one archer and 15 servants were invalided home during the siege of Harfleur. Harrington was present at the Battle of Agincourt with the other 37 men (8 men- at-arms and 29 archees) in the retinue. They were subsequently shipped back to England from Calais with 38 horses. Tradition has it that he carried the king’s banner at the battle. 40 TNA E101/69/4/382; TNA E404/31/162; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4d; TNA E101/45/21, m 5; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E 358/6 rot 6d; Ag Roll
Hastings Richard Knight Richard Hastings was born into a prominent gentry family of Yorkshire around 1387. His elder brother, Ralph Hastings, joined the Percy rebellion in 1405 and his lands were forfeited following his trial and execution. In 1410, however, Richard Hastings was fully restored to his family’s lands. He was subsequently appointed to royal commissions in the reigns of Henry V and Henry VI. He died in 1436. In 1415, Richard Hastings indented to serve with seven men-at-arms and 24 archers. It seems all were at the battle. 32 TNA E404/31/312; TNA E101/45/5 m8
Hatfeld Stephen Esquire under investigation In 1415, William Hatfeld intented to serve with one other man-at-arms and six archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA E404/31/313; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d
Hawley Thomas Knight Thomas Hawley was born into a prominent gentry family of Lincolnshire, based at Griby and Utterby. His father, William Hawley, was a loyal Lancastrian supporter and died during the expedition of John of Gaunt to Castile. Following the accession of Henry IV Thomas was elected to parliament in 1399. The following year he was rewarded for his part in the Scottish campaign by being made a King’s Knight at an annual fee of £40, and he was probably in the royal army at Shrewsbury. For the Agincourt campaign of 1415, he was granted various pledges as security for the wages of his retinue which includes a pair of gold spurs and a sword garnished with ostrich feathers, which was the king’s sword when prince of Wales. These were not redeemed until 1430, long after his death. He made his will on 29 June 1419 and died at some point before 20 May 1420. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Thomas Hawley indented to serve with one man-at-arms and six archers. The entire retinue were present at the Battle of Agincourt, where it appears that one archer was killed. They were subsequently shipped from Calais to England with seven horses. 8 TNA E101/69/5/426; TNA E404/31/163; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; TNA E101/45/22, m. 20; TNA E 358/6 rot 10d
Hay Richard Esquire under investigation In 1415, Richard Hay indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/4/391; TNA E404/31/393
Haywode Nicholas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Haywode indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/5/444; TNA E404/31/164; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2d
Heggeman John archer/smith under investigation In 1415, John Heggeman indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Richard Hodell, John Weble, John Dauson, John Hille, Robert Preston, John Peche, John de Saint Albans, Thomas Buntyngford and John Shrowesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Helyon Robert Esquire under investigation In 1415, Robert Helyon indented to serve with five other esquires, John Clement, William Burgoyne, Henry Lounde, John Asco and Robert Asshefelde, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/291 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Hemyngburgh John archer under investigation In 1415, John Hemyngburgh indented to serve with four other archers, John Weddesbury, William Thornton, Philip Gilder and Robert Killesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/399 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d
Herbelot William Labourer under investigation In 1415, William Herbelot indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Herde Robert yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Robert Herde indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Hereford John Chaplain under investigation In 1415, John Hereford indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Herforth John archer/yeoman messenger under investigation In 1415, John Herforth indented to serve with three other men, described as yeomen messagers of the king’s chamber, William Herryot, John Samuon and John Wodecok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/412 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Herforthshire Laurence Armourer under investigation In 1415, Laurence Herforthshire indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Herryot William archer/yeoman messenger under investigation In 1415, William Herryot indented to serve with three other men, described as yeomen messagers of the king’s chamber, John Samuon, John Wodecok and John Herforth. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E404/31/412 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Hersegaunt William Fletcher under investigation In 1415, William Hersegaunt indented to serve with five other fletchers, Robert Michell, John Cowpere, John Morys, Simon Chaunge and Robert Wayn. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/436 (with 5 others)
Hert Alan Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, Alan Hert indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Hertishull Roger yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, Roger Hertishull and another man, Thomas Foulere, both described as ‘valettus’ of the royal household indented to serve as archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/158 (with Thomas Fowler); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d
Hervy Thomas Valletus under investigation In 1415, Thomas Hervy was paid 33s 6d for his first instalment of his wages, along with seven other archers paid the same: Thomas Ernysoy, Roger Martyn, Richard Hunt, John Base, John Compton, William Clerk and William Starky. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA E404/31/305 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Hether William archer/purveyor under investigation In 1415, William Hether indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Heton Robert Esquire under investigation In 1415, Robert Heton indented to serve with 5 other king’s esquires, Robert Lacock, Thomas Lychbarowe, John Kytner, Richard Parker and William Wightman. Each man provided 3 archers giving a total contribution of 18 archers. These men were ordinarily part of the royal household and entered into their indenture separately from this service. They were clearly with the household between 8 and 20 July as their wages between these dates were deducted from their account. John Kytner was among those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England on 6 October and by the time the accounts were submitted he was described as deceased. The remaining esquires and their archers fought at the battle and returned to England from Calais with 33 horses. TNA E101/69/5/438 (with 5 others); TNA E404/31/296; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1; TNA E101/47/36; TNA E358/6 rot 4;
Hille John archer under investigation In 1415, John Hille indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Richard Hodell, John Weble, John Heggeman, John Dauson, Robert Preston, John Peche, John de Saint Albans, Thomas Buntyngford and John Shrowesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Hille John yeoman of the household John Hill served as servant of the armoury or the king’s body under Henry IV and was given a commission to hire workers for the work of his office in November 1408. He survived the Agincourt campaign as he was described as being yeoman of the larder for the king’s household on 25 November 1416, when he was granted an annuity of £5. CPR 1408-1413, p. 35; CPR 1416-1422, p. 50 In 1415, John indented to serve with William Bangor, Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, Roger Semper and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Hille John atte Labourer under investigation In 1415, John atte Hille indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Hobilod John Esquire Hobildod’s putative father, Adam Hobildod (d.1383), served as a coroner in Cambridgeshire in the 1370s and early 1380s, probably held property at Tadlow, where he himself came to own a sizeable moated manor-house is still surrounded by a moat but the private dwelling within it, Moat House, dates to the twentieth century. This contained, from 1408, a private oratory allowed by special licence granted to John and his wife by the bishop of Ely. Hobildod evidently first came to public attention for his prowess on the tournament field. In May 1388, already retained by Richard II as a ‘King’s esquire’, he was issued with a royal licence to sail to Calais, there to perform feats of arms against the French. This brought him some reward and the patronage of Richard II’s half-brother, John Holand, later Duke of Exeter (d. 1400). Both joined the King’s expedition to Ireland in April 1399. Having avoided involvement in the rebellion against Henry IV, which led to Holand’s death early in 1400, Hobildod soon offered his services as a soldier to the King, and on 2 Dec. 1401 he was granted £20 a year for life and received a further rewards for his services in Scotland and Wales. It was under Henry IV that Hobildod began an administrative career, serving as MP for Cambridgeshire in 1404, 1411 and again in 1416. He was sheriff of Cambrisdgeshire and Huntingdonshire in 1403-4 and 1407-8. Hobildod obtained official confirmation of his royal annuity following Henry V’s accession and was ready to fulfil the military obligations tacitly implied when the time came, not least because he would thus obtain temporary respite from defending himself at law over substantial debts. He spent three months from 22 June 1416 in the naval force engaged for the relief of Harfleur. He does not appear to have served thereafter. Creditors were still pursuing him for debt before his death around 1421. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org Hobildod contracted on 29 Apr. 1415 to serve in France with two archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA C76/98m. 7, 16; TNA E101/69/5/432; TNA E404/31/374; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Hodell Richard archer/smith under investigation In 1415, Richard Hodell indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, John Weble, John Heggeman, John Dauson, John Hille, Robert Preston, John Peche, John de Saint Albans, Thomas Buntyngford and John Shrowesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 10 TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Hodilston William Esquire under investigation In 1415, William Hodilston indented to serve with four other esquires, Robert Gloucestre, Thomas Staunton, William FitzHarry and John Folville, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/471 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/292
Hoget James Esquire James Hoget of France was given a grant of denization on 24 December 1408 when he was described as a king’s esquire, earlier in the same month he was given an annuity of £10, which was confirmed by Henry V in June 1413. He was also given an exemption for life for serving on assizes, juries, inquisitions, or holding official positions such as sheriff or escheator on 5 February 1412. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 51,427, 459; CPR 1413-1416, pp. 74, 150; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 40 In 1415, James Hoget indented to serve with another esquire Thomas de Bolde, each providing 3 archers. Unfortunately, the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. TNA E101/69/4/385 (with Thomas Bolde); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5; TNA E404/31/345
Holand Charles archer under investigation In 1415, Charles Holand indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Holand John Esquire A John Holand was appointed to a commission of walliis et fossatis in Lincolnshire in 1408, or alternatively a clerk of London mentioned in 1412 and 1413, a master John Holland, a citizen and merchant of London, appointed to investigate a dispute over a ship in November 1418,a king’s knight of the same name was given a grant of the keeping and office of Clifbailly in Northamptonshire in June 1422. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 66, 340,452; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 174, 428 In 1415, John Holand indented to serve with 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle 4 TNA E101/69/4/397; TNA E404/31/294; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Holand Nicholas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Holand indented to serve with 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E101/69/4/395; TNA 404/31/434; TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 d
Holbeth Roger archer under investigation In 1415, Roger Holbeth indented to serve with five other men, all described as yeomen of the great wardrobe, William Curson, John Boston, Thomas Werkworth, Thomas White and Hugh Skynnier. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle 6 TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 (with 5 others)
Holme Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, William Petham indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Holt Deryck van Armourer under investigation In 1415, Deryck van Holt indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Holt William Esquire William Holt was a Warwickshire man He was clearly already serving Henry Bolingbroke in some capacity at the start of his reign as Henry IV granted his king’s esquire the manor of Aston, Warwickshire, just to the north of Birmingham for life. The manor had hitherto been a cause of dispute between Holt and his kinsman, Sir Walter Bagot, who continued to press a claim to the manor until Bagot’s death in 1407. Holt remained a king’s esquire under Henry V and it was in this capacity that he served in 1415. The tenure of Aston was to be a continual source of difficulty to Holt and it was only by exploiting his connections by making Richard, earl of Warwick, Edmund, lord Ferrers and other members of Warwick’s affinity trustees of the manor that he was able to resist the claims of his nephew, Aymer. Following Holt’s death in either later 1435 or early 1436, the manor passed to another of his nephews, a king’s esquire to Henry VI, John Holt. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, William Holt indented to serve with another man-at-arms, Thomas Radcliff, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA TNA E101/45/5 m. 2d (with Thomas Radcliffe); TNA E404/31/303
Holton John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Holton indented to serve with four other esquires, Thomas Burcestre, John Belle, Robert Quykkesley and John Philip, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/398 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/299; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Hongery Nicholas de Armourer under investigation In 1415, Nicholas de Hongery indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Horsey John Esquire John Horsey knighted by March 1417 but an esquire in 1415, was MP for Dorset in 1421. His father had died in 1375 when he was 11. Some of his property was held of the duchy of Lancaster, which may explain how he came to enter royal service. No further trace of him has been discovered before 1400, though he possibly found employment under John of Gaunt or Henry of Bolingbroke, for it was only shortly after the latter assumed the throne, in January 1400, he was described as ‘King’s esquire’. He may have been a lieutenant of Windsor Castle from at least September 1404 when he received £15 for expenses of the earl of Douglas, incurred while the latter was imprisoned at Windsor earlier in the year. As lieutenant he was instructed in May 1409 to take custody of the earl of Fife, the son of the earl of Douglas and ten other Scottish prisoners. Horsey was clearly less in favour with Henry V, who, although he renewed the annuity of 20 marks, removed him from the lieutenancy of Windsor in September 1413. But the King did grant him, perhaps in recompense, a tun of wine every year from the port of Bridgwater as from September 1413; and Horsey continued to be called ‘the King’s servitor’. After 1415, Horsey was knighted, but seems to have retired from royal service to his estates in the West Country. He died on 3 Sept. 1422, leaving as his heir a younger son, Henry. Some sixteenth century members of the family have tombs surviving in Yetminster Church and it is possible that John was buried there himself though no evidence remains. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Horsey indented to serve with 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle 4 TNA E101/69/4/378
Horton Nicholas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Horton indented to serve with 4 other esquires, Henry Bromley, John Clynk, John Louthe and William Wolde who together provided 11 archers. John Louthe and William Wolde remained in Harfleur as members of the garrison with 3 archers. Clynk, Bromley and Horton and 8 archers fought at the battle and survived to return to England from Calais with 11 horses. 16 TNA TNA E101/69/3/369 (with 4 others); E404/31/352; TNA E101/45/9; TNA E101/46/11; TNA E358/6 rot 6;
Hudelston Richard Esquire under investigation In 1415, Richard Hudleston indente to serve with William Hudleston, possibly his brother, with each man providing 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 6 TNA E101/69/6/479 (with Wm. Hudleston); TNA E404/31/240; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1
Hudelston William Esquire A William Hudleston was appointed to a commission of oyer and terminer to investigate an alleged act of violence in Northamptonshire on 8 May 1411. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 319. As the Agincourt roll gives him as knight he may have been knighted during the campaign. Was he the MP of this name? http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/huddlestone-william n 1415, William Hudleston’s indented with Richard Hudleston, possibly his brother, with each man providing 2 archers. William and his archers were present at the battle and survived to return to England from Calais with 5 horses TNA C76/98 m. 15, 18, 19A; TNA E101/69/6/479 (with Robert Hudelston); TNA E404/31/240; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1; TNA E358/6 rot 7d; Ag roll
Huden Richard archer/saddler under investigation In 1415, Richard Huden indented to serve with four other archers, all saddlers in the royal household, William Tikhill, John Preston, Thomas Sadeller and William atte Halle. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others)
Hungerford Walter Knight Walter Hungerford (1378/9-1449) was the fourth but only surviving son of Sir Thomas Hungerford. The latter had been chief steward of the duchy of Lancaster lands in southern England, and the whole family were committed to the Lancastrian cause. Walter was knighted on the eve of Henry’s coronation. He later served as a JP, MP and sheriff for the counties of Wiltshire and Somerset, in addition to military and diplomatic missions. He was elected speaker of the parliament of April 1414 and served on two diplomatic embassies. In 1416 he was an admiral at the naval battle off Harfleur. The following year he was appointed as a royal councillor and steward of the king’s household. He spent the next five years campaigning in France, and was involved in campaigns under Henry VI too. On August 31 1422 he was appointed as joint guardian of the king’s infant son, Henry VI. This led to his elevation to the peerage as Lord Hungerford in 1426 and two months later he was appointed Treasurer of England. He died at Farleigh Hungerford on 9 August 1449. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Walter Hungerford indented to serve with 19 men-at-arms and 60 archers. It seems that all were at the battle, where several prisoners were taken by his retinue. 80 TNA E101/69/5/425, TNA E101/69/3/368; TNA E404/31/165; TNA E101/45/5 m.5; TNA E101/45/20, m. 3; Ag Roll
Hunt Richard archer under investigation In 1415, Richard Hunt indented to serve with seven other archers, Thomas Hervy, Thomas Ernysoy, Roger Martyn, John Base, John Compton, William Clerk and William Starky. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/305 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Hunt Robert Esquire under investigation In 1415, Robert Hunt indented to serve with two other esquires, John Ryder and Stephen Ferrour, each of which provide 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/452 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/306; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Hunte John Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, John Hunte indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Huntingdon John Holland, earl of earl Born at Dartington, Devon, in 1395, John’s father was John Holand (d. 1400), first duke of Exeter and half-brother of Richard II. Following his father’s execution for rebellion against Henry IV in 1400, John was raised by his mother and her second husband, Sir John Cornewall who was a leading captain on the campaign of 1415. John was involved in key activities in the siege of Harlfeur, often with his step father. John had a very active military career in the conquest of Normandy, but was captured at the battle of Baugé on 22 March 1421 and found himself the prisoner of a Scot, Sir John Sibbald; he spent five years in captivity in Anjou though his military career in France continued following his release. He was created duke of Exeter in 1444. On his death on 5 August 1447, following a long career in war, he was buried at the church of St Katharine by the Tower, London.This was demolished in the early nineteenth century but his tomb found its way into the chapel of St Peter ad Vincula at the Tower of London. Huntingdon indented for the service of 80 men, himself, 1 knight and 18 men-at-arms and 60 archers. One of his archers died at Harfleur while another 22 members of his retinue were invalid home but his retinue seems to have been boosted by additional troops: he may have taken additional archers with him in the first place. At the battle he had 78 men, (himself, a knight, 18 men-at-arms and 58 archers). We know that one man-at-arms, Henry Strete, and four archers died at the battle. Another archer died at Calais after the battle. Shipping was provided for the remaining 72 men, the earl, his knight, 17 men-at-arms and 53 archers with 72 horses. 60 TNA E404/31/89; 295; TNA E101/45/5 m1, m. 2d; TNA E101/45/22 m. 30; TNA E101/45/18 m. 2; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 9; E101/45/7; E358/6 rot 9d; Ag Roll
Hurlebatte John yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, John Hurlebatte indented to serve with one other man, John Sturgeons, both described as being yeomen companions of the royal household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/422 (with John Sturgeons); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Huyn Gerard Esquire under investigation In 1415, Gerard Huyn indented with another esquire, John Roundell, with each man providing 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/353; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Ireby John Esquire John Ireby received an annuity of £20 from Henry IV on 2 December 1400. This was later confirmed by Henry V on 12 June 1413. CPR 1413-16, pp. 27 In 1415, John Ireby indented to serve with two other esquires, Robert Bolron and John Skipton, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/457 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/270; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Isender William Knight Little seems to be known about William Isender. On 20 January 1400 he was retained for life by Henry IV at an annual fee of 100 marks; which was confirmed by Henry V on 1 August 1414. In 1415, William Isender indented to serve with four men-at-arms and 15 archers. It seems that all were present at the battle. 20 TNA E404/31/418; TNA 101/45/5 m10d
John Lewis Esquire Lewis John was a Welshman probably from the Carmarthen area but prospered as a London merchant, thanks partly to his links with Thomas Chaucer, son of the poet, who appointed him as his deputy as butler in the port of London. Together they supplied wine to the households of Henry IV and Henry V. Being elected an MP in 1413, he also married the sister of Richard, earl of Oxford. Alice de Vere, as the widow of Sir Francis Court, held dower estates in Hampshire, and it was in her right that John came into possession of land in Holbury and East Tytherley in that county and this provided the justification for his election as MP for Hampshire in 1414, of which county Chaucer was sheriff. In that parliament he successful applied for letters of denization making him fully English. Later he settled at West Horndon in Essex and was MP for the county five times between 1420 and 1439. Knighted in 1439, Lewis John died perhaps while overseas, on 27 October 1442. In his will of 2 June 1440, he had requested burial in a tomb already prepared for him in the abbey of St. Mary Graces in London. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Lewis John’s retinue consisted of himself, a second man-at-arms and 6 archers. Lewis John himself was invalided home from Harfleur, but some of his retinue did fight at the battle under the leadership of Sir John Montgomery. Others remained in the garrison at Harfleur they served for a quarter of a year returning to Dover with 10 horses. Though he did not fight at the battle, Lewis John’s connections were important in its aftermath. Among the prisoners taken at Agincourt was Louis, count of Vendôme, over whose ransom there arose considerable dispute. Eventually, in 1417, the sum of £5,000 was offered, and while two-thirds was found by two Florentine financiers, it was Lewis John who provided securities for the payment of the first instalment. 8 TNA E101/69/6/467; TNA E404/31/348; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d; TNA E101/47/19; TNA E358/6 m. 10
John Reynold Labourer under investigation In 1415, Reynold John indented to serve with three other named labourers, David Clere, Philip Dew and John Ducas, as well as a further 116 other unnamed labourers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle TNA E101/69/8/517 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Jordan Adam yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Adam Jordan indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Joy Hayne Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Hayne Joy indented to serve with five other master gunners, John Simmondeson, Reynold Willianis, Gerardo Vanwillighen, Henry Van Pruce and Bernardo Van Loon. Hayne Joy was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle, but did serve in the garrison of the town. 18 TNA E101/69/8/514 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Kendale Walter archer under investigation In 1415, Walter Kendale indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, William Petham, Thomas Holme and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Kent Thomas Carpenter under investigation In 1415, Thomas Kent indented to serve with five other men, all described as carpenters of the hall, William Carpenter, John Westwode, William Batte, John Wyke and John Bole. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/390 (with 5 others)
Kent Thomas de Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas de Kent indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Kenyngion John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Kenyngion indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Kerby John archer Aug. 9 1413 Grant for life to the king’s servant John Kexby, yeoman of the ewery, of a house in the parish of AllHallows, Watlyngstrete, London, to the value of 5 marks yearly, as Katharine late the wife of John Punchardon had in her life of the grant of Henry IV. The ewery was the office in the household responsible for water and the vessels for drinking or washing of the person. The word comes from ‘ewer’, a sort of pitcher. It was not, It should be noted, responsible for laundry work, this being the province of the napery. CPR 1413-1416, p. 92. In 1415, John Kerby indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, Richard Marchant, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d (with 11 others); TNA E404/31/326
Kerby William archer under investigation In 1415, William Kerby indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others)
Keynesham John yeoman of the bakehouse under investigation In 1415, John Keynesham indented to serve with seven other men, described as yeomen of the bakehouse, Nicholas Burcestre, Ralph Morley, Thomas Goldsmyth, Henry Wendone, John Carpenter, Robert Mason and John Mason. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/410 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Kikevy John yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, John Kikevy indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Killesby Robert archer under investigation In 1415, Robert Killesby indented to serve with four other archers, John Weddesbury, William Thornton, Philip Gilder and John Hemyngburgh. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/399 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d
Kirkeham Richard yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Richard Kirkeham indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth and William Couper. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Kyghley Richard Knight Surprinsingly little is known of Richard Kyghley despite his death at the battle. He may have been born in 1370 and was the son of Sir Henry. His main seat was Inskip with Sowerby (Lancs. – an archer called William Tailor of Inskip is found in his company in 1415, dying at the siege). In 1396 he acquired the manor of Lightshaw (Lancashire). He was a knight by 1408 when he stood as feoffee for the manor of Askwith (Yorks). He was married to Katherine who had preivously been rhe wife of Sir Peter Mauleverer. His heir was his son Henry, who was 24 at his father’s death. In 1415, Richard Kyghley indented to serve with five men-at-arms and 18 archers. He was also in charge of 50 archers from Lancashire. One man-at-arms was killed at the siege of Harfleur with a further two men-at-arms invalided back to England. He was present at the Battle of Agincourt where he was killed along with four of his archers from his retinue. Two men-at-arms and 14 archers were subsequently shipped from Calais to England with 23 horses. Of the 50 archers in the special company, seven were taken prisoner the day before the battle, six died during the siege of Harfleur, including William Tailor of Inskip, the manor which Sir Richard held. Eight had been left as garrison at Harfleur, 10 were invalided home. the remaining 19 were at the battle and returned home from Calais with 8 horses. 24 TNA E101/69/4/386; TNA E404/31/252; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4d; TNA E101/46/5; TNA E101/47/30; TNA E101/44/29; TNA E 358/6 rot 4d; Ag Roll
Kyllum Thomas Chaplain under investigation In 1415, Thomas Kyllum indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Kylver John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Kytner indented to serve with 5 other king’s esquires, Robert Heton, Robert Lacock, Thomas Lychbarowe, Richard Parker and William Wightman. Each man provided 3 archers giving a total contribution of 18 archers. These men were ordinarily part of the royal household and entered into their indenture separately from this service. They were clearly with the household between 8 and 20 July as their wages between these dates were deducted from their account. John Kytner was among those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England on 6 October and by the time the accounts were submitted he was described as deceased. The remaining esquires and their archers fought at the battle and returned to England from Calais with 33 horses. TNA E101/69/5/438(with 5 others); TNA E404/31/296; TNA E101/45/5 m.1; TNA E101/47/36; TNA E358/6 rot 4
Kyngman John Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, John Kyngman indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11; TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Kynwolmerssh William Esquire, cofferer of household William came from Killamarsh in Derbyshire. He was first named as a king’s servant in January 1405, and by 1406 he was a clerk in the wardrobe of the king’s household. Later he was presented to the church of Keyston in Huntingdonshire, and became warden of St James’s Hospital, Westminster. In 1407 he received money from the exchequer as agent of Sir John Tiptoft, then keeper of the wardrobe, and by the early years of the reign of Henry V he had risen to the office of cofferer of the household. He was among those invalided home from Harfleur but nevertheless, on 20 December 1415, he was granted the office of clerk of the treasurer, with a special appointment as deputy to Lord Fitzhugh, the treasurer, when the latter was serving in France, and with the reversion of the office of treasurer, if Fitzhugh should die or surrender it while overseas. This was a remarkable appointment, an early recognition that the clerk was the treasurer’s deputy; and it was highly unusual to grant the reversion of so high an office—especially to one who had risen from a humble clerkship. Fitzhugh’s other responsibilities kept him from fulfilling his duties as treasurer, and Killamarsh duly succeeded him on 26 February 1421; he was reappointed at the beginning of Henry VI’s reign, but he died on 18 December 1422 though evidently he had been ill for some time: his In his will, he left money to seven servants and his executors, one of whom, Richard Merfyn, had been one of his men-at-arms in 1415, while another, John Wodehouse, had been his colleague in the exchequer. In his capacity as cofferer of the household, and as deputy to Sir Roger Leche, keeper of the wardrobe, he was retained to serve in the Agincourt campaign of 1415 with two other men-at-arms and nine archers, but he was invalided home on 6 October. 12 TNA C76/98 m. 20; TNA E101/69/4/39; TNA E404/31/401; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 14; TNA E101/47/11; TNA E358/6 rot. 3d; Ag roll
Kyrketon Alayn Cleric of the revestry Alan Kyrketon was a royal chaplain serving in the chapel royal. He was appointed Canon at Windsor in 1426, and was archdeacon of Toness from 1433 to 1443. In 1415, Alayn Kyrketon indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Kyrton John archer On 29 May 1403, John Kyrton was granted the office of ranger of the forest of Bere and custody of the King’s woods ‘Papynholt’ and ‘Shrowenore’ for life by Henry IV. The grant describes him as the King’s servant and yeoman of the Butlery. The grant was later amended and clarified on 8 December 1405, as the forest was in fact known as ‘Kyngesberee’ and stated that he would receive a wage of 2d daily from the county of Southampton. Henry V reconfirmed this grant on 26 October 1417. CPR 1416-1422, pp. 125 In 1415, John Kyrton indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, Richard Marchant, John Kerby, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 11 TNA E101/45/5/ m. 6d (with 11 others); TNA E404/31/326
Lacok Robert Esquire under investigation In 1415, Robert Laycock indented to serve with 5 other king’s esquires, Robert Heton, Thomas Lychbarowe, John Kytner, Richard Parker and William Wightman. Each man provided 3 archers giving a total contribution of 18 archers. These men were ordinarily part of the royal household and entered into their indenture separately from this service. They were clearly with the household between 8 and 20 July as their wages between these dates were deducted from their account. John Kytner was among those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England on 6 October and by the time the accounts were submitted he was described as deceased. The remaining esquires and their archers fought at the battle and returned to England from Calais with 33 horses. 24 TNA E101/69/5/438 (with 5 others); TNA E404/31/296; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1; TNA E101/47/36; TNA E358/6 rot 4;
Lacy Edmund Dean of the royal chapel Edmund Lacy was an Oxford graduate who became master of University College. In 1401 he was appointed a canon at Windsor and in 1414 dean of the Chapel royal. He was elected to the bishopric of Hereford in 1417, and subsequently became bishop of Exeter in 1420. He was one of the executors of Henry V’s will, having been close to the king as a theologian and cleric. He died in 1455. In 1415, Edmund Lacy indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll, who were accompanied by 33 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 64 TNA E101/45/5 m. 11; E404/31/444
Lamberhosse John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Lamberhosse indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Lancastre Thomas cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, Thomas Lancastre indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Langville John Clerk of the king’s spicery under investigation In 1415, John Langville indented to serve with six other men, Stephen Payne, William Balne, John Feriby, Thomas Morton, Walter Burton and Robert Castel, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/5/412 (with 6 others); TNA E404/31/415; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Lary John Esquire under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Lary indented to serve with three other esquires, John Chetwynd, Ralph Pope and William Burton, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/459; TNA E404/31/154; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Lavender Richard archer under investigation In 1415, Richard Lavender indented to serve as an archer with three others, William Lavender, very likely his brother or father, John Dent and John Hall who were each paid £6.13.4 to serve as archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d (with 3 others); TNA E404/31/326
Lavender William archer under investigation In 1415, William Lavender indented to serve as an archer with three others, Richard Lavender, very likely his brother or son, John Dent and John Hall who were each paid £6.13.4 to serve as archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle 4 TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d (with 3 others); TNA E404/31/326
Lawrence Robert Esquire Robert Lawrence was the eldest son of Edmund Lawrence. When his father died in the early 1380s, Robert became the ward of John of Gaunt, his feudal overlord. Later he would side with Henry Bolingbroke and was retained with an annuity of 10 marks shortly after Henry took the throne in 1399. This was increased to 40 marks retrospectively in 1403, although payments often fell into arrears. Robert was appointed coroner for Lancashire during the early part of Henry IV’s reign and acted as a royal commissioner and tax collector during this time as well. He was elected to Parliament in 1404 and attended the Lancashire elections for Henry V’s first Parliament in 1413. Henry V confirmed his annuity and Robert accompanied the King on his first invasion of France, where it appears he was knighted. Royal patronage allowed him to secure the wardship of Thomas Hesketh and arrange good marriages for his children. He received further confirmation of his annuity in 1423 and was licensed to hunt freely once a year in the parks and chases belonging to the Duchy of Lancaster. He served as sheriff of Lancaster for over 12 years, a financial burden which eventually forced his retirement in 1437. Over 70 years old, he died on 8 September 1439. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Robert Lawrence’s retinue consisted of himself, another man-at-arms and 6 archers in addition to a company of archers from Lancashire, part of the kings’ personal lands. All fought at the battle and survived, taking several prisoners. They returned to England for Calais with 18 horses. 8 TNA E101/69/6/472; TNA E404/31/241; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4d; TNA E101/46/7; 8; 9; TNA E101/47/12; TNA E358/6 rot. 4d;
Leche John archer under investigation In 1415, John Leche indented to serve with nine other archers, Thomas Breuster, Richard Chircheman, Thomas Norton, Nicholas Fwy, William Buxton, John Porto, John Bolton, John Croysier and John Pilton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Leche Philip Knight Philip Leche of Chatsworth (d. 1420) was the only surviving son of Roger Leche, a prominent member of the Derbyshire gentry. He was knighted on the eve of Henry V’s coronation, and was MP for Derbyshire in 1414, and late gained his father’s previous office as steward of the High Peak. In 1416 he served for part of the year in the garrison at Harfleur, before returning to England on his father’s death in November. Leche joined Henry V’s second expedition to France in 1417, where he provided a retinue of 10 men-at-arms and 161 archers. Continuing to serve into 1419, he was rewarded with lands in Normandy. The following year he once again served in France where he was killed at the siege of Melun in July 1420. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Philip Leche indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 12 TNA E101/69/7/482; TNA E404/31/166; TNA E101/45/5 m.2d; TNA E101/45/22, m. 7
Leche Roger Knight Roger Leche (d. 1416) of Chatsworth was father of Philip, and had risen to prominence in Derbushire through loayl service to the house of Lancaster. He had come of age by September 1388 when he acted as a trustee of land in Chesterfield. Following the accession of Henry IV to the throne, he was appointed to royal commissions and served as a Justice of the Peace. He was also granted an annuity of £66 13s 4d and was made sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire in November 1400. Leche later served fighting the Welsh rebels; in 1403 he spent a month securing the defences of Carmathen Castle against attack. He was elected to the parliaments of 1402, 1406, May 1413 and November 1414. Leche was later appointed Treasurer of England, which he undertook for six months until September 1416, at an annual fee of 100 marks. He died in November 1416. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Roger Leche indented to serve with 19 men-at-arms and 60 archers. 80 TNA E404/31/297; 101/69/5/437 ; TNA E101/45/5 m.3d
Lee Richard atte Labourer under investigation In 1415, Richard atte Lee indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Lee William atte sergeant at arms William atte Lee was a serjeant of arms for the king, on 21 May 1414 he was tasked with arresting Sir John Drayton and bringing him before the king in Chancery. He evidently survived the Agincourt campaign as he was instructed to arrest shipping for the king’s service in March 1416 and to recruit smiths in 1421. CPR 1413-16, pp. 221, 265, 415; CPR 1416-1422, p. 387 In 1415, William atte Lee indented to serve with two other men. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA C76/98 m. 21; TNA E101/69/6/453; E101/45/5 m. 4d; E404/31/167
Legh William de Knight William de Legh (d. 1428) was born into a gentry family of Leigh, Cumberland. He is first mentioned in 1394, when he was granted letters of protection for Richard II’s expedition to France; these were later rescinded as he was said to have tarried in Chester. Legh had been knighted by August 1396. He was elected to the parliament of 1399 and was made sheriff of Cumberland by Henry IV. On March 1402 he was granted an annuity of 40 marks and was again elected to parliament. He stayed loyal to Henry IV during the Percy rebellions and was therefore kept in his office as sheriff. In 1417 Legh participated in Henry V’s second expedition to France, where he led a retinue of 14 men and was present at the siege of Louviers. He died on 10 April 1428. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, William de Legh indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. He was not present at the Battle of Agincourt, as he was invalided home together with one man-at-arms and three archers. The remaining man-at-arms and six archers did fight at the battle. 12 TNA E101/69/5/437; TNA E404/31/329; TNA E101/45/5 m.4d; TNA E 358/6 rot 3; Ag Roll
Lenkenore John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Lenkenore indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Lenthale Roland Knight Lenthale, of Hampton Court (Herefordshire), was a long term servant of the house of Lancaster, being described as a king’s esquire on 19 January 1400 when he was retained by Henry IV at an annual fee of £40, and by 1408 being associated with Prince Henry. By March 20 1415 he was described as a king’s knight and was granted the keeping of manors in South Wales. In December of the same year, he was given the wardship of the son and heir of Sir John Mortimer in consideration of ‘his great expenses on the king’s last voyage’. He served on the 1416 campaign to rescue Harfleur, and in the later conquest of Normandy. Lenthale was appointed to commissions of the peace in Herefordshire in 1422 and Shropshire in 1413 and 1422 but also served in France on various occasions. he also served Henry VI, being described in 1441 as one of the king’s knights for the body. He had died by June 1448. His fine house,for which he had a licence to crenellate in 1434, is open to visit. In 1415, Sir Roland Lenthale indented to serve with eleven men-at-arms and 36 archers. Two archers were killed at the siege of Harfleur and three men-at-arms were invalided home. Roland Lenthale together with the remaining eight men-at-arms and 34 archers fought at the battle. They were later shipped back from Calais to England with 46 horses. men from the retinue of Lord Scrope of Masham, executed for his role in the Southampton Plot,had also been transferred into his command 48 TNA E404/31/265; TNA E101/45/5 m.1; TNA E 101/45/18 m. 5; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/46/13; TNA E 358/6 rot 8d; Ag Roll
Lesyngham Esmon cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, Esmon Lesyngham indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Lety Robert archer under investigation In 1415, Robert Lety indented to serve with five other archers, all wheelwrights in the royal household, John Flete, Walter Wheller, Thomas Wheller, John Blakeman and Thomas Leycestre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Leycestre Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Leycestre indented to serve with five other archers, all wheelwrights in the royal household, John Flete, Robert Lety, Walter Wheller, Thomas Wheller and John Blakeman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Loker William yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, William Loker indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Longevyle John Esquire Relatively little is known about John Longevele but was probably of a gentry family of Northamptonshire. A man of this name held office as escheator of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire for five terms between 1388 and 1402 and died in 1439. In 1415, John Longevele indented to serve with three archers. They were present at the Battle of Agincourt and were later shipped back from Calais to England with three horses. 4 TNA E358/6 rot 9d (where knight)
Lounde Henry Esquire under investigation In 1415, Henry Lounde indented to serve with five other esquires, John Clement, Robert Helyon, William Burgoyne, John Asco and Robert Asshefelde, with each man providing 3 archers. Two of Loude’s archers were recorded on a sick list. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/291 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d; TNA E101/45/1;
Lounde Alexander Knight Alexander Lound (d. 1431) held South Cave in Yorkshire, and was probalby the son of a man of the same name who had served under John of Gaunt in the 1370s. He supported Bolingbroke’s invasion and was well rewarded. By 1405 he was a knight. Henry IV had further reason to be well disposed after Alexander had offered support in resisting the rebellion of the earl of northumberland in 1408. This won him 10 marks yearly from the issues of the county of Yorkshire, for his ‘good service and especially in resisting the malice of Henry Percy, the late Duke of Northumberland and other traitors’. Henry V confirmed Alexander’s grants and also appointed him constable of the castle of Bamburgh. He was MP for Yorkshire in 1407, 1413 and 1414. He does not seem to have served in France after 1415. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Alexander Lounde indented with one other man-at-arms and six archers. It seems that they were all at the battle. 8 TNA C 76/98 m. 21; TNA E404/31/242; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4;
Louthe John Esquire John Louth was a clerk rather than an esquire, who was attached to the master of ordnance. On 1 September 1413 a commission was given to John [Gerard] Sprong, esquire, and John Louth, clerk, to take horses, oxen, waggons and carts for the carriage of certain guns and other things necessary for them from the town of Bristol to the city of London. In the following year, on 22 September 1414 John Louth, clerk, with Nicholas Merbury, master of the works of the king’s engines and guns and other ordnance for war, was ordered to take stone-cutters, carpenters, sawyers, smiths and labourers for the works, with timber, iron and all other necessaries and carriage for the same. He later carried out similar tasks for Henry V after Agincourt as late as 1430 and 1439 acting as attorney to John Steward, knight. In 1415, John Louthe indented to serve with 4 others, Henry Bromley, John Clynk, Nicholas Horton and William Wolde who together provided 11 archers. John Louthe and William Wolde remained in Harfleur as members of the garrison with 3 archers. Clynk, Bromley and Horton and 8 archers fought at the battle and survived to return to England from Calais with 11 horses. 16 TNA E101/69/3/369 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/352; TNA E101/45/9; TNA E101/46/11; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7; TNA E358/6 rot 6;
Lovell Robert Esquire Robert Lovell was born sometime after 1373, the younger son of Lord Lovell and Baroness Holand. He was married as a minor to the heiress Elizabeth Bryan, who with her sister Philippa (wife of Lord Scrope), were joint heiresses to extensive estates in Wales, the West Country and Kent. In 1400 Elizabeth attained her majority and her inheritance. Philippa died in 1406 and her inheritance passed to Elizabeth and Robert, although they permitted Lord Scrope to retain three of the manors in Somerset for his lifetime. Elizabeth also inherited four manors in Suffolk from her mother, but these only passed to her after Robert’s death. In 1394, Robert sailed to Ireland in the company of the Bishop of Meath, he returned to Ireland once more in the Bishop’s company in 1396 and once again in the Earl of March’s company in 1398. His father was one of the first to join Henry Bolingbroke in Chester and was appointed to Parliament in 1404 and 1406. Robert found his way into the company of Henry of Monmouth and was a member of the prince’s retinue in the Welsh Marches in July 1404. He was later appointed as Clerk of Works at Clarendon, where it appears he may have lived for a while, becoming lieutenant there for the King’s brother Humphrey Duke of Gloucester until 1424. He was close to Prince Henry and he seems to have taken out loans and stood surety on the Prince’s behalf. Lovell was apparently not implicated in Lord Scrope’s treason, just before King Henry V’s first campaign to France, despite their friendship and close family ties, although it has been speculated that this may have affected Lovell’s relationship with the King. He fought at Agincourt and returned to England via Dover in November. Financial problems led to him mortgaging his estates for 1,000 marks. In 1419, he was granted a pardon for outlawry (he had failed to attend court to answer for his debts). He was later pardoned twice more for the same offence of outlawry in 1420 and 1426. In 1420 he was appointed to supervise the musters for the Duke of Bedford’s army in France. He returned in 1421 and was shortly after elected to Parliament. In 1427 he presented Parliament with a petition showing that Henry V had been indebted to him for £2,330, although he was supported by the Duke of Gloucester it is uncertain if any of the money was ever repaid to him. He died an outlaw again in August 1434 and his chattels were confiscated. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Robert Lovell’s retinue consisted of himself, another man-at-arms and 6 archers. All fought at the battle and survived, returning to England from Calais with 18 horses. 8 TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA E101/69/4/388; 440; TNA E404/31/33; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Lovve John yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, John Lovve indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Lowart Peter Esquire under investigation In 1415, Petr Lowart indented to serve with 5 other men-at-arms and 18 crossbowmen. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 24 TNA E101/69/5/420; TNA E404/31/423; TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Lwer Robert Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, Robert Lwer indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Lychbarowe Thomas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Thomas Lynchbarrow indented to serve with 5 other king’s esquires, Robert Heton, Robert Lacock, John Kytner, Richard Parker and William Wightman. Each man provided 3 archers giving a total contribution of 18 archers. These men were ordinarily part of the royal household and entered into their indenture separately from this service. They were clearly with the household between 8 and 20 July as their wages between these dates were deducted from their account. John Kytner was among those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England on 6 October and by the time the accounts were submitted he was described as deceased. The remaining esquires and their archers fought at the battle and returned to England from Calais with 33 horses. TNA E101/69/5/438 (with 5 others); E404/31/296; TNA E101/45/5 m.1; TNA E101/47/36; TNA E358/6 rot 4
Lye John archer under investigation In 1415, John Lye indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Lynchelade John archer under investigation In 1415, John Lynchelade indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, William Petham, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Lynton William Labourer under investigation In 1415, William Lynton indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Malbon John archer under investigation In 1415, William Malbon indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 26 TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Malthouse William archer On 1 September 1413 a grant for life was made to the king’s servant William Malthous, one of the Westminster, yeomen of the hall of the household, of the office of collector of the king’s rents of Wyndesore with all fees, wages (extending to 3d. daily) and other profits pertaining to the office, as Richard Pairemay had. CPR 1413-16, p. 92. In 1415, William Malthowse indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, Richard Marchant, John Kerby, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d;
Man John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Man indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Manfeld Thomas Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, Thomas Manfeld indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Manfeld William yeoman of the poultry under investigation In 1415, William Manfeld indented to serve with three other men, all described as yeomen of the king’s poultry, Norman Swynford, John Bekuyffeld and John Ponde. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/366 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Mapurley Thomas Esquire Son of Thomas Mapperley, a successful lawyer from Derbyshire who attended Parliament between 1388 and 1413. His son, Thomas served as an esquire on Henry V’s campaign and fought at Agincourt and was later involved in the conquest of Normandy, empowered in early 1420 to take Piercourt Castle for Henry V. In 1415, Thomas Mapurley indented to serve with four other esquires, Thomas Appulton, William Castellon, John Agarston and Thomas Corbet, each of which provide 3 archers. Unfortunately, the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. TNA E101/69/6/447 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d; TNA E358/6 rot 10d;
March Edmund Mortimer, earl of earl Edmund (1391-1425) was descended from the second son of Edward III, making him the focus of several plots to overthrow Henry IV and Henry V. The threat he posed seems not to have been matched by his ambition, however. It was Edmund himself who exposed the Southampton plot – designed to put the young earl on the throne in place of Henry V – to the king at Portchester on 31 July 1415. Never fully trusted by the Lancastrian regime, he was nonetheless bound to it and contributed to the war in France both under Henry V and Henry VI. He died of plague at his castle of Trim in Ireland and was buried at the Priory of Clare, Suffolk. March’s retinue consisted of himself, a knight banneret, 3 knights, 55 men-at-arms and 160 archers. Of these, 3 knights, 8 men-t-arms and 21 archers were invalided home from Harfleur but the remainder fought at the battle. at which the earl also seems to have been present, although a tradition has developed that he too was invalided home. 220 TNA C76/98 m.13, 14, 20; TNA E404/31/169; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4; TNA E101/45/20 m. 40; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 6; Ag Roll
Marchant Richard archer under investigation In 1415, Richard Marchant indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, John Kerby, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Marshall William Esquire January 8 1410, William Marshall was given a commission to take materials and men to repair the castles belonging to the Duchy of Lancaster in the southern counties. Later that year he was given a commission by Henry IV on April 3 1410 to bring Walter Broke and five others before the council. On September 17 1410, William Marshall (described as the King’s esquire) was granted the goods of Thomas Colerne in the county of Wiltshire. Colerne’s property had been confiscated after he had been convicted of ‘diverse felonies’ and money generated from his property was to go towards the repairs to Winchester Castle. In 1411, a parson, Roger Sckot, was pardoned for outlawry after failing to appear in court to answer an outstanding debt he owed to William Marshall of 10 marks. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 215, 224, 232, 254 In 1415, William Marshall indented to serve with 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA C76/98 m. 7, 20, 16; TNA E101/69/4/405; TNA E404/31/298; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Martin John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Martin indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Martyn Roger archer under investigation In 1415, Roger Martyn indented to serve with seven other archers, Thomas Hervy, Thomas Ernysoy, Richard Hunt, John Base, John Compton, William Clerk and William Starky. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/305 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Mason John yeoman of the bakehouse under investigation In 1415, John Mason indented to serve with seven other men, described as yeomen of the bakehouse, Nicholas Burcestre, Ralph Morley, Thomas Goldsmyth, Henry Wendone, John Keynesham, John Carpenter and Robert Mason. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/410 (with 7 others)
Mason Robert yeoman of the bakehouse under investigation In 1415, Robert Mason indented to serve with seven other men, described as yeomen of the bakehouse, Nicholas Burcestre, Ralph Morley, Thomas Goldsmyth, Henry Wendone, John Keynesham, John Carpenter and John Mason. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/410 (with 7 others)
Mathewe Thomas Master carpenter Thomas Matthew was a Master Carpenter who, on 6 June 1415, was commissioned, with William Gille, to find 120 carpenters and ‘tournours’ (likely wood turners), to go to London by 17 June for the king’s service overseas. CPR 1413-1416, p. 346 In 1415, Thomas Matthew indented with a second Master Carpenter, William Temple. Each man was to provide another 59 other carpenters for a total force of 120 men. It is uncertain whether they were at the battle 60 TNA E101/69/8/518 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Mautravers, John lord baron John Arundel (1385-1421) was cousin of Thomas, earl of Arundel (d. 1415) and held the Mautravers barony by inheritance through his mother. He served in the Welsh wars in 1404 as well as in Henry V’s campaigns in Normandy 1417-20. The castle and honour of Arundel descended to John as heir male to Earl Thomas who died shortly after he returned home from the siege of Harfleur, but he was prevented by John Mowbray, earl of Norfolk, the late earl’s brother-in-law and heir general, from inheriting the title. In 1415, John’s retinue consisted of himself, one knight, 18 men-at-arms and 45 archers. Of these, 8 men-at-arms and 13 archers with three servants – his butler, chamberlain and cook – were invalided home from Harfleur. He was at the battle with the remainder of his troops. 65 TNA C76/98 m. 14; TNA E404/31/375; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 15; Ag Roll
May Richard smith under investigation In 1415, Richard May indented to serve with two other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Thomas Smith and William Ferro. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others)
May Thomas Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas May indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Medway William purveyor under investigation In 1415, William Medway indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Hether, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Melton John Minstrel under investigation In 1415, John Melton, a minstrel, indented to serve on the campaign but no further details of his service are known TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Melton John archer under investigation In 1415, John Melton indented to serve with one other archer, Guy Midelton, both described as being ‘king’s guides by night’. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); 422; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Mendy Jacob Clerk of the napery under investigation In 1415, Jacob Mendy indented to serve on the campaign, but no further details about his service are known 1 TNA E404/31/363 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Merbury John Esquire John Merbury (d. 1438) was a valued Lancastrian retainer and official. He began his military service in 1389 as an archer. In 1400 he became chamberlain of South Wales, the lands held as part of the principality of Wales by Prince henry, and helped to defend the prince’s interests against Glyn Dwr. By Feburary 1414 he was also steward of Brecon, an area held by Henry V by inheritance from his mother. He raised the troops for the 1415 French campaign in South Wales but did not cross to France himself, staying instead to ensure the good defence of the area. www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Merbury, as chamberlain of south Wales, indented to serve with 20 men-at-arms and 500 archers from South Wales. Their fate has been studied by Dr Adam Chapman in the Journal of Medieval Military History, vol IX, 2011. 520 TNA E101/45/5 m. 10; TNA E101/46/20 partics with names; TNA E358/6 rot 6d;
Merbury Nicholas Esquire Nicholas Merbury first entered the service of Henry Percy, earl of Northumberland, and fought at the Battle of Humbleton Hill against the Scots in 1402. He brought news of this victory to Henry IV and was rewarded with an annuity of £40, which led him to enter royal service. In September 1411 he received a licence from the king to marry Margaret, the widow of Edward, Lord Latimer. He was elected to represent the county of Northamptonshire in the parliaments of May 1413 and April 1414. In September of 1414 he was appointed as the first master of the ordnance and received payments for the provision of artillery for the expedition. After the Agincourt expedition he remained as master of the ordnance, until his death in 1421, and played an important role in the administration of the royal guns for the king’s later campaigns in France. Nicholas’s brother, John Merbury, also served on the campaign as well as a third brother, Laurence, who was knighted at this date and received a protection to serve in 1415 as a member of the retinue of John, lord Talbot. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 308, 371, 478, 483; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 67, 140,307, 379, 386, 409, 410, 428, 434, 456. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Nicholas Merbury’s retinue consisted of himself with 5 men-at-arms and 18 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 24 TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA E404/31/171; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d; Ag roll
Merssh William Master smith under investigation In 1415, William Merssh indented to serve with 41 other smiths, but no further details of their service is known 42 TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Meryng William Esquire William Meryng came from a well-established family that had lived at Meering since the time of Henry II. He first appears in the records in 1408 when he is given a grant for life by the King to take dead wood from the forest of Galtres, in Yorkshire, to make charcoal. His family were involved in a lengthy dispute over a property in Nottinghamshire and the situation began to deteriorate as both sides began to enlist allies and many, including William were indicted for crimes arising from the mobilisation of private armies, although most received pardons. Matters did not improve and eventually a special assize had to be convened to decide the matter. Eventually an agreement was reached which stated that were the Tuxford family to die without issue the estate would be entailed to the Meryng family. William continued to show contempt for the law and was accused in Chancery court, in 1414 and 1416, of recruiting large forces of retainers and ‘famuliers’. However, he easily escaped justice, something which may have had something to do with his position at court. He is recorded as having performed ‘good service’ for Henry IV and served in Henry V’s personal retinue in his 1415 invasion of France. He was knighted by the time that Henry V prepared to go to Normandy in 1417. He took part in the siege at Rouen in 1418 and went with the King to Pontoise and Gisors. The death of his wife called him back to England, where he gained control of her estates. In 1420, he set out to escort Arthur of Brittany from Southampton to meet with the King at Melun. His expenses remained unpaid for several months and his attendance at Parliament in 1421 may have provided him with the opportunity to ask for them to be paid. In 1422 he appears on a list of English captains entitled to share in the ransoms paid by French captives. After the death of Henry V, William appears to have retired from military life. In 1425 he was returned to Parliament as the shire knight and in 1432 he became a JP. He was made sheriff at around the same time and later became sheriff again in 1438. In 1442 he was made King’s Knight and was awarded two tuns of wine per year for life. In 1445 this grant was changed to include his son William too. William made his will in 1449 and is believed to have died shortly afterwards. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, William Meryng’s retinue consisted of himself and 3 archers. All fought at the battle and survived, returning to England from Calais with 3 horses. 4 TNA C76/98 m. 15; TNA E101/69/6/466; TNA E404/31/370; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d; TNA E358/6 rot 10; Ag roll
Michel John purveyor under investigation In 1415, John Michel indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, William Hether, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 2281 TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Michell Hankyn purveyor under investigation In 1415, Hankyn Michell indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, William Hether, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, John Brigford, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Michell Robert Fletcher under investigation In 1415, Robert Michell indented to serve with five other fletchers, William Hersegaunt, John Cowpere, John Morys, Simon Chaunge and Robert Wayn. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 6 TNA E404/31/436 (with 5 others)
Middleton William Minstrel under investigation In 1415, William Middleton, described as a minstrel, indented to serve by himself, but no further details of his service are known 1 TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Midelton Guy archer/king’s guides under investigation In 1415, Guy Midelton indented to serve with one other archer, John Melton, both described as being ‘king’s guides by night’. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 2 TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); 422; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Mikelfield John yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, John Micklefield, valettus, indented directly with the crown with Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, , Henry Scaldere, Gregory Scalder, William Shorne, Richard Breuster, Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Mildenhale John Clerk under investigation In 1415, John Mildenhale indented to serve with another man, John Burwell, both described as clerks of the royal chapel, but no further details of their service is known TNA E404/31/411 (with John Burwell); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Mille Thomas atte Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas atte Mille indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Montgomery John Esquire Montgomery was subsequently knighted and had a substantial career in the wars in France. In 1415, John Montgomery’s retinue consisted of himself with 3 archers. Montgomery and his archers were placed in the Harfleur garrison which they left after the end of the second quarter of a year’s service. 4 TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d;TNA E404/31/331;TNA E101/47/30; TNA E358/6 rot 10d;
Montgomery Nicholas Knight Nicholas Montgomery (d. 1434) was born to a gentry family with extensive estates in Derbyshire and Staffordshire. He was appointed to his first royal commission in January 1414, was elected to parliament in April (for Derbyshire) and was a knight by later the same year. In March 1416 he was again elected to parliament but also served on the campaign which rescued Harfleur at the battle of the Seine. By June 1418 he was entrusted with the custody at the castle of Tutbury of the duke of Bourbon who had been captured at the Battle of Agincourt. By December 1419, he was in charge of the duke of Orleans instead. He also served in the later stages of the conquest of Normandy, but not, it seems, after the death of Henry V, probalby because he came into his inheritance at the death of his father in 1424. He himself died in 1434. see www.historyofparliamentonlin.org On 1415, Nicholas Montgomery indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 12 TNA E404/31/225; TNA E101/69/5/424 ; TNA E101/45/5 m2d
Mordon Richard yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Richard Mordon indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Morley John Esquire possibly the MP of this name? http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/morley-john In 1415, John Morley indented to serve with one other esquire, Richard Tunneley, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 6 TNA E101/69/6/473 (qwith Richard Tunneley); TNA E404/31/281; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Morley Ralph yeoman of the bakehouse under investigation In 1415, Ralph Morley indented to serve with seven other men, described as yeomen of the bakehouse, Nicholas Burcestre, Thomas Goldsmyth, Henry Wendone, John Keynesham, John Carpenter, Robert Mason and John Mason. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/410 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Morpath Stephen Chaplain under investigation In 1415, Stephen Morpath indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Morstede Thomas surgeon Thomas Morstede was the son of Thomas and Alianora Morsted of Betchworth, Surrey. Unlike William Bradwardine, Henry V’s other surgeon in 1415, Morstede had not had a university education. He is first recorded, as Thomas Morstede, ‘leech’, in a London deed of 1401. He had been apprenticed to the London surgeon Thomas Dayron (d. 1407), who bequeathed him two books of surgery and physic. By 1410 ‘Thomas Morstede, surgeon’, had entered Henry IV’s service, receiving an annuity of £40, and for the next twelve years he was on active royal service. In 1411 he occurs as king’s surgeon. In April 1415 Morstede and William Bradwardine, described as the king’s surgeons, contracted to serve the king abroad for a year, each bringing a team of surgeons. They served on the Agincourt campaign from 8 July to 24 November 1415 and in June 1416 contracted to supply surgeons and makers of surgical instruments for the next campaign, which departed for France in July 1417. Morstede, who was acquiring property in London in February 1417, probably served in this campaign as well and returned with the king to England in February 1421, for he is next recorded in London in March 1421 when he obtained the wardship of an orphan. He probably went back to France with the king in June 1421 and remained there until Henry V’s death (31 August 1422); he next appears in December 1422, when his annuity of 1410 was reconfirmed. His will dated 20 April 1450 and proved 8 June forgives a debt of 10 marks owed by a former apprentice, Edmund Burcetre, ‘for his apprenticeship’, and leaves extensive bequests, including ‘my English book bound with two latitudinibus’ and ‘all my instruments of surgery’, to his current apprentice, Robert Bryttende or Briggend. In addition to Morstede’s lavish pious bequests, he built a chapel in the north aisle of his parish church of St Olave Jewry, where he was buried. Nothing now survives of the medieval church and of its Wren-built replacement, only the tower and part of the west end is left. see Oxford Dictionary of national biography Morstede, the king’s surgeon, contracted to bring a team of 12 surgeons on the campaign supported by 3 archers. 16 TNA C76/98 m. 15, 16; TNA E101/69/4/409; TNA E404/31/420; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6; TNA E101/48/3
Morton Thomas Clerk of the wardrobe under investigation In 1415, Thomas Morton indented to serve with six other men, Stephen Payne, William Balne, John Feriby, Walter Burton, John Langville and Robert Castel, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/5/412 (with 6 others); TNA E404/31/415 (with 6 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Morys John Fletcher under investigation In 1415, John Morys indented to serve with five other fletchers, Robert Michell, William Hersegaunt, John Cowpere, Simon Chaunge and Robert Wayn. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/436 (with 5 others)
Mountenay William Esquire William Mountenay was granted, on 7 December 1413, the keeping of the manors of Tuderley and Lockerley in the county of Southampton with all profits during the minority of Thomas de Court. He surrendered the grant on 23 February 1414 as it was invalid and was given another grant in lieu. The manors were later granted to Lewis John. CPR 1413-16, pp. 142,164, 232 In 1415, William Mountenay’s retinue consisted of himself and 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E101/69/7/486B; TNA E404/31/371; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7; TNA E101/45/6; 45/24; 46/18; 19
Mourton Hugh Esquire under investigation In 1415, Hugh Mourton indented to serve with two other esquires, Randolph Barton and Olivier Barton, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/460 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/269; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4
Mynour William archer under investigation In 1415, William Mynour indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Newman John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Newman indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Newman Thomas archer On 1 February 1417 Thomas Newman, described as the groom of the cellar, and James Dell were given a grant for life of 6d daily from the custom of wools, hides and wool fells in the port of Kingston on Hull. He appears to have died by 1421 as the grant is given to Nicholas Myldon and William Lyndessey and it is mentioned that he is deceased. CPR 1416-1422, pp. 58, 62, 366, 399 In 1415, Thomas Newman indented to serve as an archer. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume he was present at the battle. 1 TNA E404/31/414; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d;
Newmestre William cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, William Newmestre indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Nightyngale William Labourer under investigation In 1415, William Nightyngale indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Norfolk John yeoman of the household On 30 December 1415, John (who was described as a king’s servant) was granted 12 marks per year from the issues, fines and amercements of the court of Marshalsea. CPR 1413-1416, p. 379 In 1415, John indented to serve with William Bangor, Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Hille, Roger Semper and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); E101/45/5 m. 3
Norfolk John Mowbray, earl (Marshal) earl John (1392-1432) was the younger son of Thomas Mowbray and became earl of Norfolk following the execution of his brother, Thomas, for rebellion in 1405. He was restored to the office of Marshal of England in 1412 and was responsible, in 1415, for investigating the Southampton Plot and sentencing its perpetrators. He continued in military service during the invasion of Normandy in 1417 and into the 1420s.He was restored to the dukedom his father had forfeited in 1425 and was careful to exercise his duties as Marshal though his political contribution otherwise was limited. His will instructed that he should be buried at the Charterhouse on the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire. The Earl Marshal’s retinue consisted of 200 men – himself, 4 knights, 45 men-at-arms and 150 archers. The earl was invalided home from Harfleur with 1 knight, 10 men-at-arms and 47 archers and only 138 of his retinue – 4 knights, 30 men-at-arms and 100 archers – fought at the battle. The account of the receiver general in the Berkeley castle muniments, accessible at the Gloucestershire Record Office as microfilm 12) tells us more about his troops. 200 TNA E404/31/170; TNA E101/ 45/5 m. 4d; TNA E101/ 45/1; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 6; TNA E101/47/37, 38; Ag Roll
Norman John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Norman indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Norman Philip Labourer under investigation In 1415, Philip Norman indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Normanton Henry clericus On 3 February 1417, Henry Normanton and a man at arms Nicholas Mauduyt were commissioned to take all ships and vessels over 20 tuns in the counties of Devon, Cornwall, Bristol, Somerset, Dorset, Southampton, Kent and Gloucester to Southampton along with their crews, before 18 March 1417. On 12 July 1417 Henry Normanton was again commissioned, with a clerk John Everdon, to auditthe accounts of the king’s officials (Bailiffs, Chamberlains, Sheriffs etc.) in South Wales each year. They were granted 5s daily for their expenses each day they were working and £10 yearly from the the officials in South Wales. CPR 1416-1422, pp. 85, 121 In 1415, Henry Normanton indented to serve with one archer. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume he was present at the battle. 2 TNA E101/45/5 m. 7; TNA E358/6 rot. 3
Norton Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Norton indented to serve with nine other archers, Thomas Breuster, Richard Chircheman, Nicholas Fwy, William Buxton, John Porto, John Bolton, John Croysier, John Pilton and John Leche. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Not William Master mason under investigation In 1415, William Not indented to serve with three other master masons, John Benet, John Cliff and John Colchestrem, as well as a further 96 other unnamed masons. Given the nature of their trade they may have remained at Harfleur after its surrender but seems that at least some served at the battle since Not appears in the Agincourt roll. TNA E101/69/8/520 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10; Ag roll
Nowell John Esquire John Nowell was granted 20 marks yearly from the issues of the county of Hereford by Henry IV on 26 March 1400. This was later reconfirmed by Henry V on 30 September 1413. On 11 June 1410, John Nowell, Henry Aston and Thomas Edward were commissioned to take tuns, pipes and other vessels of wine for the expenses of the King’s household. On 15 November 1410 he was pardoned for outlawry after failing to appear in court to answer debts from a vitner of £13 2s and a debt of £8 owed to William Horewode. On 20 June 1415, the chancellor of the University of Cambridge is commissioned to arrest John Nowell and others and bring them before the Chancery court. He was pardoned again for outlawry (after once again failing to appear to answer for his debts) on 21 May 1416. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 195, 249; CPR 1413-16, pp. 158, 347; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 15 In 1415, John Nowell indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA C76/98 m. 15; TNA E101/69/6/465; TNA E404/31/67
Olton William Esquire In 1399, William Olton received a grant of £10 yearly from Henry IV, which Henry V confirmed on 13 June 1413.CPR 1413-16, pp. 62 In 1415, William Olton indented to serve with 2 archers, but no further details of their service is known. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E404/31/377; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Olyner Thomas yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Thomas Olyner indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Orell William Esquire under investigation In 1415, William Orell indented to serve with two other esquires, Henry Pemberton and Thurstan Anderton, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 9 TNA E101/69/6/477 (with two others); TNA E404/31/282; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2; TNA E101/46/17; TNA E358/6 rot 1d
Osbaldeston John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Osbaldeston indented to serve with four other esquires, Henry Skerbrick, Nicholas Atherton, Gilbert Barton and Thomas Rigmaiden, with each man providing 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/284 (with four others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d; Ag roll
Oskest Martin van gunner under investigation In 1415, Martin Van Oskest indented to serve with two other master gunners, Frederick Colle and Simon Dredric. Martin Van Oskest was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. 9 TNA E101/69/8/515 (with 2 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Othvin John archer under investigation In 1415, John Othvin, described as a surveyor of the stable, indented to serve as an archer. Unfortunately the surviving documents cannot tell us whether he took part in the battle and no details are known of his further service 1 TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Oxford Richard de Vere, earl of earl The career of Richard de Vere (1385-1417) was characterised by military activity. His enthusiasm for martial activities was evident in the summer of 1405 when, while still a minor, he served on a fleet raiding the northern French coasts, led by Henry IV’s second son, Thomas, and then in September he accompanied the king on a campaign into Wales against Owain Glynd?r. His will, made shortly before his departure on the Agincourt campaign, appointed his wife, Alice, as the sole executor and directed burial in his family’s mausoleum at Earls Colne Priory, Essex. His fine tomb survives, though now at Bures St Stephen, Suffolk. One chronicler has him dying at the battle but this is not true. There is some uncertainty over the size of the company which the earl of Oxford contracted to bring. No indenture survives but his warrant for issue suggests that he was to serve serve in person with 39 men-at-arms and 100 archers. However the special issue roll for the campaign states that he indented for 40 men-at-arms and 60 archers. Nine men-at-arms and 32 archers were invalided home from Harfleur but this appears not to have affected the military strength of the earl’s retinue which is recorded in post campaign accounts at its full strength at the battle.Although he may have lost two men-at-arms at the battle, 37 men-at-arms, each with a page, 100 archers and 126 horses arrived in Calais to be shipped back to England. 100 TNA C76/98 m. 14; TNA E404/31/254; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4; TNA E101/45/21 m. 13; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 7; TNA E101/46/36; TNA E358/6 rot. 8d; Ag Roll
Pak William Labourer under investigation In 1415, William Pak indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Parker Richard Esquire Richard was the son of John Parker of Great Waltham, Essex. He seems to entered the service of Henry V while Henry was Prince of Wales and on 8 Sept. 1406, however, he was given a grant, under the seal of the principality of Wales, of five marks a year. This award described him simply as one of the prince’s servants a yeoman of his kitchen, but by 1409, when the prince appointed him parker of Byfleet, Surrey, he was a ‘yeoman of his household’. After Henry’s accession, Parker not only continued in his employment, but was granted, in July 1414 and from the issues of Byfleet, another annuity of five marks. In the next year he took part, with a following of three archers having indented with 5 other servants of the king’s household as esquires, in the royal expedition to France, and in 1418 he was awarded a corrody at Spalding priory, Lincolnshire. Richard Parker was MP for Lyme Regis, Dorset, a town with which he had no obvious connection, in 1421. Although he left the royal household after Henry V’s death, he remained in royal service, as parker at Byfleet and, in 1429, in the retinue of John, duke of Bedford. From 1436 on he shared the Spalding corrody with his son-in-law, John Penycock, another yeoman of the Crown, who from 1442 also received half of his salary at Byfleet. In March 1444 he settled land in Felstead, Essex, on his grandson, Lancelot, but nothing is recorded of him thereafter. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Richard Parker indented to serve with 5 other king’s esquires, Robert Heton, Robert Lacock, Thomas Lychbarowe, John Kytner and William Wightman. Each man provided 3 archers giving a total contribution of 18 archers. These men were ordinarily part of the royal household and entered into their indenture separately from this service. They were clearly with the household between 8 and 20 July as their wages between these dates were deducted from their account. John Kytner was among those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England on 6 October and by the time the accounts were submitted he was described as deceased. The remaining esquires and their archers fought at the battle and returned to England from Calais with 33 horses. TNA C76/98 m. 9; TNA E101/69/5/438 (with 5 others); TNA E404/31/296; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1; TNA E101/47/36; TNA E358/6 rot 4
Passemere Robert Esquire On 1 May 1416, Robert Passmere received a commission from King Henry V to take ships and other vessels for John, Earl of Huntingdon and his retinue who were going to sea in the king’s service. CPR 1416-1422, pp. 72 In 1415, Robert Passemere indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E404/31/172; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2d
Passenham Ralph archer Ralph Passenham was granted for life the office of Keeper of the Castle and Gaol at Cambridge on 19 November 1415. He was later pardoned on 3 September 1416 after a group of prisoners overpowered the keepers of the gaol, John Smyth and his wife Alice, and escaped in his absence. On 14 July 1421 Ralph was pardoned again for the same offence, although this time he was required to surrender his grant. CPR 1416-1422, pp. 72 He was also bailiff for Northampton and represented the borough twice in Parliament. He married Isabel Draper, the widow of a Stamford burgess. They were already married by 1439, although the exact date of their marriage is not known. MP for Northampton, 1419, 1427 In 1415, Ralph Passenham indented directly with the crown with, Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere – very likely Geoffrey’s brother – William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Geoffrey Scalder, valettus,Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. . TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m.3
Passin Ralph Labourer under investigation In 1415, Ralph Passin indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Payne Stephen almoner Stephen Payne was listed as one of the men who were responsible for supervising the grant of pavage which had been granted to the bailiffs and ‘good men’ of the town of Howden, on 27 September 1412 for six years. Stephen was the almoner of the king and was responsible for distributing alms to the poor on the king’s behalf. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 425 In 1415, Stephen Payne indented to serve with six other men, Robert Castel, William Balne, John Feriby, Thomas Morton, Walter Burton and John Langville, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 28 TNA E101/69/5/412 (with 6 others); TNA E404/31/415 ; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d; E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 13
Peche John smith under investigation In 1415, John Peche indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Richard Hodell, John Weble, John Heggeman, John Dauson, John Hille, Robert Preston, John de Saint Albans, Thomas Buntyngford and John Shrowesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Pegast John Master gunner under investigation In 1415, John Pegast indented to serve with four other master gunners, Thomas Plum, John Charyng, George Brydlingytun and John Sawer. John Pegast was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/516 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Pek William Clerk of the royal household under investigation In 1415, William Pek indented to serve with four other clerks of the household, Thomas Bridde, Randolph Appulton, Robert Allerton and Richard Reston. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/338 (with 4 others)
Pemberton Henry Esquire under investigation In 1415, Henry Pemberton indented to serve with two other esquires, William Orell and Thurstan Anderton, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/477 (with two others); TNA E404/31/282; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2; TNA E101/46/17; TNA E358/6 rot. 1d;
Percevale Griffin archer under investigation In 1415, Griffin Percevale indented to serve with 7 other esquires, William Smythson, John West, John Benyfeld, Roger Shermay, Thomas Berton, Nicholas Sanle and Matthew Bowre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/4/380 (with 7 others); TNA E404/31/320; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Percy Henry Knight Sir Henry Percy (1385-1432) was the son of Thomas Percy (1366-87), who was himself son of Henry Percy, first earl of Northumberland (d. 1408), and Elizabeth Strathbogie, heiress of David IV Strathbogie, who claimed the earldom of Atholl. He was therefore the nephew of Hotspur and cousin of the heir to the earldom of Northumberland who was in 1415 still in captivity in Scotland. Henry married Elizabeth Bardolf and had estates in Yorkshire. He died in 1432 without issue. Percy’s retinue consisted of himself, serving as a knight, 5 men-at-arms and 18 archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 24 TNA C 76/98 m. 22; TNA E404/31/266; TNA E101/45/5 m.5d; TNA E101/45/22 m. 37
Percy Thomas Knight Relatively little is known about Thomas Percy. He may have been the brother of Sir Henry Percy of Atholl. On 22 September 1401 he was retained by Henry IV for £40 and was described as a knight the following year. Percy received a pardon for rebellions and felonies committed by him on 27 June 1405. On 25 August 1408 he was described as a king’s knight and was retained by Henry IV for £40, which was confirmed by Henry IV on 1 October 1413. In 1415, Thomas Percy indented to serve with one man-at-arms and six archers. It seems that all were at the battle 8 TNA C 76/98 m. 21; TNA E101/69/5/439; TNA E404/31/173; TNA E101/45/5 m1d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 33; Ag Roll
Perkyn John archer under investigation In 1415, John Perkyn indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Perott John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Perott indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Peryent John Esquire On 8 January 1412 Henry IV reconfirmed a grant of the revenues of the liberty of Peveral in the counties of Northamptonshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Leicestershire to John Peryent and his wife Joan and son Thomas. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 130, 251 In 1415, John Peryent indented to serve with another esquire, Nicholas Alderwiche with a third man-at-arms and 9 archers. Nicholas appears to have been one of those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given license to return to England. It is possible that Nicholas may have died of his illness because by the time the account was enrolled he was described as deceased. The remainder of their retinue fought at and survived the battle and returned to England from Calais with 11 horses. 12 TNA C76/98 m. 22; TNA E101/69/3/374; TNA E404/31/332; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5; TNA E358/6 rot 7d
Peterburgh John archer under investigation In 1415, John Peterburgh indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Elys, Richard Marchant, John Kerby, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Petham William archer under investigation In 1415, William Petham indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Peynton Nicholas Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Peynton indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Peynton Stephen Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, Stephen Peynton indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Phelip John Knight John Phelip (d. 1415) came from a relatively minor gentry family of Suffolk (his elder brother William also served in 1415). Phelip benefitted from the patronage of his uncle, Sir Thomas Erpingham, which led to the former being granted an annuity as a king’s esquire and a placement in the household of Henry Prince of Wales. He distinguished himself in warfare in Wales and in January 1406 was given an annuity of £40. On the eve of the coronation of Henry V he was knighted along with his brother. He was elected to parliament to represent Worcestershire in 1413 and in December 1414 was appointed to an embassy to France. According to his monumental brass in St MAry’s Kidderminster Henry V ‘loved him as a friend’: he died at Harfleur on 2 October. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Phelip indented to serve with 29 men-at-arms and 90 archers. Phelip died at the siege of Harfleur and four of the archers were invalided home but the rest of the retinue fought at the battle. 120 TNA C 76/98 m. 19A; TNA E101/69/5/422; TNA E101/45/5 m.3; TNA E101/45/22, m. 11; TNA E101/45/1
Phelip William Knight William Phelip (1380-1441) came from a relatively minor gentry family of Suffolk (his younger brother John also served in 1415). Phelip benefitted from the patronage of his uncle, Sir Thomas Erpingham, which led to the former being granted a share of an annuity of £40 as a king’s esquire. He received further favours from Henry IV such as the custody of the manor of Spernall in Warwickshire, a gift of two horses and a further annuity of 10 marks in 1402. By the summer of 1408 he made an advantageous marriage to Joan, daughter and co-heir of Thomas, Lord Barfolf, whose estates had been forfeited in 1405 for participation in the rebellion of the earl of Northumberland. Later in 1411 he was appointed constable of Norwich Castle with its annual fee of £20. On the eve of the coronation of Henry V he was knighted along with his brother. In 1414 he was elected to represent Suffolk in both parliaments that year. He served on the 1416 campain to rescue Harfleur. In 1417 he raised 85 men for the king’s expedition to France and fought in the conquest of Normandy. The following year he received a nomination to the Order of the Garter. In April 1420 he was commissioned to treat for the surrender of Melun Castle and was appointed captain of Harfleur the next year. Three months later he was appointed Treasurer of the Household, a position which he held until the death of Henry V in 1422. In 1430 he accompanied Henry VI to France with a retinue of 80 men and was appointed as Chamberlain of the Household in 1432. IIn 1437 he was created Lord Bardolf. He died on 6 June 1441: his fine tomb at Dennington in Suffolk is well worth a visit. In 1415, Sir William Phelip indented to serve with nine men-at-arms and 30 archers. However he was only able to recruit 29 archers. Two men-at-arms and 10 servants were invalided home during the siege of Harfleur. William Phelip and the rest of his retinue were present at the Battle of Agincourt and were later shipped back to England from Calais with 27 horses. The retinue took prisoners worth just over £21. 40 TNA C 76/98 m. 19A; TNA E101/45/5 m3; TNA E101/45/22, m. 39; TNA E101/44/30 no. 4 m.5; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/46/16; TNA E 358/6 rot 5;
Philip John Esquire John Philip is listed as a witness on 18 July 1412 when Henry IV confirmed a charter given to the prior and convent of Michelham, which dated from the time of Henry III. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 424 In 1415, John Philip indented to serve with four other esquires, Thomas Burcestre, John Belle, Robert Quykkesley and John Holton, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 20 TNA E101/69/4/398 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/299; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Pilkington John Esquire possibly knighted during the campaign? In 1415, John Pilkington indented to serve with 3 archers. This reveals that 2 of his archers and 2 servants not included among his retinue, fell ill at Harfleur and were given license to return to England. Since he served at the battle with 3 archers and returned to England from Calais with these same archers and 7 horses, it is unclear whether these men recovered or were replaced 4 TNA E101/69/6/458; TNA E404/31/273; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d; TNA E358/6 rot 4d; Ag roll
Pilton John archer under investigation In 1415, John Pilton indented to serve with nine other archers, Thomas Breuster, Richard Chircheman, Thomas Norton, Nicholas Fwy, William Buxton, John Porto, John Bolton, John Croysier and John Leche. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Plomaker Dirk Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Dederico Plomaker indented to serve with five other master gunners, Gerardo Van Vengarde, William Cutteller, Dederico de Vere, Petro Clusman and Calis Van Rosty. Dederico Plumaker was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. 18 TNA E101/69/8/512 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Plum Thomas Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Thomas Plum indented to serve with four other master gunners, John Charyng, George Brydlingytun, John Sawer and John Pegast. Thomas Plum was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. 15 TNA E101/69/8/516 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Pole Martin Esquire under investigation In 1415, Martin Pole’s retinue consisted of himself and 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA E101/69/6/469; TNA E404/31/333; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8
Pole Ralph del Esquire On 27 September 1404, Ralph del Pole and his wife Lettice, were given letters patent granting them a tun of wine yearly by Henry IV, in order to retain Ralph. However, on 9 July 1412, Ralph was forced to surrender his goods to his brothers as a result of his ‘outlawry on a personal action’. His grant of a tun of wine was confirmed by Henry V on 22 March 1414. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 423; CPR 1413-16, pp. 219 In 1415, Ralph del Pole’s retinue consisted of himself and 2 archers. It is possible he was invalided home as his name appears in one of the sick lists. 3 TNA C76/98 m. 19A; TNA E101/69/6/478; TNA E404/31/394; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 14
Pole Richard cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, Richard Pole indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Ponde John archer under investigation In 1415, John Ponde indented to serve with three other men, all described as yeomen of the king’s poultry, Norman Swynford, John Bekuyffeld and William Manfeld. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/366 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Pope Ralph Esquire under investigation In 1415, Ralph Pope indented to serve with three other esquires, John Chetwynd, Nicholas Lary and William Burton, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/459 (with 3 others); TNA E404/31/154; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Pope Thomas yeoman peyntour under investigation In 1415, Thomas Pope indented to serve with three other men, described as yeomen ‘peyntours’, William Seveburgh, John Duddyll and William Cookerham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 3 others)
Pope William Esquire William Pope was granted the estates of Ralph Frechevile on 9 February 1417 for life, as Ralph’s heir Gervase was deemed unsuitable as he was an ‘idiot’. He was granted the lands, rents, revenues, profits, services up to the value of 40 marks yearly, with any surplus going to the exchequer. On 16 December 1422, William, described as the King’s esquire and servant, was granted the office of the chirography for life. He later vacated this office by surrender in order that Henry VI could grant him the office by letters patent on 24 February 1424. CPR 1416-1422, pp. 61, 409. Was he the MP for Winchelsea Sussex in 1433 and 1435? In 1415, William Pope indented to serve with another esquire, Andrew Gray. Their retinue consisted of themselves and 6 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/6/462 (with Andrew Gray); TNA E404/31/289; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4
Porter Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Porter indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Porter William Esquire William Porter came from a relatively modest background, his family only owned the small manors of Tixover, Ketton, Edith Weston and Kilthorpe. He started his career in the household of Sir Hugh Despenser, but in only a few years had moved into the household of Henry, the Prince of Wales. Henry gave him an annuity of £20 a year, this was later replaced with the grant of a manor in Cheshire and a grant of 50 marks a year. Henry’s stepmother Queen Joan granted him the post of yeoman ranger in her forests in Wiltshire. This was confirmed by King Henry IV, who in 1409 granted William a sum of forfeited money (£36). William is mentioned as having taken part in the mission to France led by Thomas Earl of Arundel to aid the Duke of Burgundy in 1411. William married Agnes, the wealthy widow in 1411. In addition to the land she brought with her to the marriage, William secured the wardship of her stepdaughter. Agnes was also in line to inherit a substantial portion of her father’s wealth on his death. This marriage made William a very wealthy man. He attempted to buy three rich estates in England belonging to the Abbey of Cluny, taking out a royal licence to cross the channel to speak to the Abbot in person as well as promising to use his influence with Prince Henry to order’s advantage. However, it turned out to be unnecessary as on his accession to the throne Henry V resumed the lands to the crown and granted them to William, to hold for the duration of the war with France. William continued to be retained in Henry’s household after he came to the throne. William was sent to Paris in the winter of 1414 to assist the Bishops of Durham and Norwich in peace negotiations, which failed. William then returned to prepare for the invasion of France in the following year. He seems to have been knighted for bravery at harfleur, fought with Henry at Agincourt and returned with the King in November. He was shortly afterwards granted in tail male the reversion of an estate at Faringdon, to be received on the death of Sir Thomas Erpingham among other grants of land. He returned to France in 1417 with Henry and took part in the conquest of Normandy, where he was given further grants of land. In 1419 he was repeatedly named as an envoy to the French to negotiate both the peace and Henry’s marriage to Katherine. William returned to England with the King in 1421. He attended the coronation of Queen Katherine and returned to France where he remained on active service with the King until his death in 1422. William then returned to England with the funeral cortege. He was named as an executor in Henry’s will, something which he was to be involved in until his own death several years later. William attended two of the early parliaments in Henry VI’s reign and was among those retained to escort him to France for his coronation. William used his influence with the crown to good advantage purchasing estates to add to those he had been granted by the King. He was involved in a few land disputes, but these were often resolved in his favour. He died childless in 1436. Much of his land reverted to the crown, but his widow Agnes remained a very wealthy woman and arranged for a chantry for her second husband William Standon. Her nephew agreed to found a chantry on her death, but there was no similar provision made for William PorterCPR 1408-1413, pp. 55, 154,184, 369; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 41, 66, 111, 351, 406, 456. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, William Porter’s retinue consisted of himself, 7 men-at-arms and 24 archers. One man-at-arms, John Colvre, was among those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England. The remaining 7 men-at-arms and 24 archers fought at the battle and survived to return to England from Calais. The men-at-arms had 3 horses each – 21 in total – while the archers had one each, with 24. 32 TNA C76/98 m. 14; TNA E404/31/255; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2d; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/46/23; TNA E358/6 rot 11;
Porto John archer under investigation In 1415, John Porto indented to serve with nine other archers, Thomas Breuster, Richard Chircheman, Thomas Norton, Nicholas Fwy, William Buxton, John Bolton, John Croysier, John Pilton and John Leche. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/337 (with 9 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d
Prentys John Chaplain under investigation In 1415, John Prentys indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Preston John saddler under investigation In 1415, John Preston indented to serve with four other archers, all saddlers in the royal household, William Tikhill, Thomas Sadeller, William atte Halle and Richard Huden. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Preston Robert smith under investigation In 1415, Robert Preston indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Richard Hodell, John Weble, John Heggeman, John Dauson, John Hille, John Peche, John de Saint Albans, Thomas Buntyngford and John Shrowesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Purser Richard Labourer under investigation In 1415, Richard Purser indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Quykkesley Robert Esquire under investigation In 1415, Robert Quykkesley indented to serve with four other esquires, Thomas Burcestre, John Belle, John Philip and John Holton, each of which provided 3 archers. Unfortunately, the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. TNA E101/69/4/398 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/299; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Radcliff John Esquire John Radcliffe was the youngest son of James Radcliffe, from Lancashire and a supporter of Henry IV. John served in the entourage of the king’s second eldest son, Thomas of Lancaster (later Duke of Clarence) and may have fought at the Battle of Shrewsbury in 1403. In the following year he was granted an annuity of £10 from the revenues of the Duchy of Lancaster. His marriage to a wealthy heiress, Cecily, granddaughter of Sir Robert Mortimer, meant that he became a wealthy landowner. He was knighted by Henry V on the Agincourt campaign after the army landed at Harfleur. He later served in the garrison of the town after it was captured and took part in the king’s second expedition to France in 1417. By 9 March 1419 he was described as a king’s knight when he was given a grant of two parts of the manor of Framesdene in Suffolk to the total value of £25, during the minority of Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Morley, in lieu of another grant given by Henry V. In May of the following year he was appointed as constable of Bordeaux and captain of Fronsac Castle in Aquitaine. He was elected to represent Norfolk in the parliaments of 1420 and 1427, later dying on 26 or 4 March 1441 and was buried in the choir of Attleborough Church in Norfolk. originally from Lancashire, but MP for Attleborough, Norfolk. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 361; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 182, 267, 299, 393. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Radcliffe’s retinue consisted of himself, with 5 men-at-arms and 18 archers. All were placed in the garrison of Harfleur and therefore did not fight at the battle. 24 TNA E101/69/6/464; TNA E404/31/271; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6; TNA E101/45/10; 11; TNA E358/6 m. 8
Radcliffe Robert Esquire Of Lancashire. Under investigation In 1415, Robert Radcliffe’s retinue consisted of himself and 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E 101/69/6/450; TNA E404/31/226; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4
Radcliffe Thomas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Thomas Radcliffe indented to serve with another man-at-arms, William Holt, with each man providing 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/303 (with William Holt); TNA E101/45/5 m. 2d
Radcliffe William Esquire son of Thomas Radcliffe In 1415, William Radcliffe indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E404/31/389
Radcliffe Richard Knight Richard Radcliffe was born into a gentry family of Lancashire. He inherited his estates from his father, also called Richard, in 1403. Radcliffe was in receipt of an annuity from Henry V and served as sheriff of Lancashire until his death in 1430. In 1415, Richard Radcliffe indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. All seem to have been present at the battle. He also was in command of a company of archers from Lancashire. 12 TNA E101/69/5/423; TNA E404/31/243; TNA E101/45/5 m.4d; TNA E101/45/22, m. 40; TNA E 358/6 rot 2 (Lancs archers); Ag Roll
Rassh John Esquire Possibly an escheator in the county of Essex – as mentioned as a commissioner on 11 November 1412 – CPR 1408-1413, p. 473 Seemingly an esquire of the household, he indented to serve with Henry Fowler, also an esquire of the household. In 1415, John Rassh indented to serve with another esquire of the household, Henry Fowler. John provided 3 archers whereas Henry contributed a further 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 7 TNA C76/98 m. 20; TNA E101/69/4/406 (with Henry Fowler); TNA E404/31/342
Raumsey Ralph Esquire Of Suffolk, he held the manor of Kenton, near Debenham, of the Earl of Suffolk at the time of the latter’s death in 1415 In 1415, Ralph Raumsey’s retinue consisted of himself and 2 archers. All fought at the battle and appear to have survived. 3 TNA E101/69/5/446; TNA E404/31/428; TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 d; TNA E358/6 rot 1;
Rempston Thomas Knight Thomas Rempston (d. 1458) was from a gentry family of Nottinghamshire, his father having achieved royal favour through his connection with Henry Bolingbroke, the future Henry IV. Rempston was knighted on the eve of the coronation of Henry V and was elected to represent Nottinghamshire in the parliaments of 1413 and 1416. He served on the campaign of 1416 to rescue Harfleur and in the conquest of Normandy and continued to servein France even after Henry V’s death, being associated with the duke of Bedford as chamberlain of his household. He was involved in militry cooperation with the Burgundians in 1424, and in 1428-9 served at the siege of Orleans. He was captured at the Battle of Patay in 1429 but eventually ransomed, returning to England in July 1436. He was appointed lieutenant of Calais the following year and seneschal of Gascony 1440, where he was again captured in 1442. He died on 15 October 1458. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Thomas Rempston indented to serve with seven men-at-arms and 24 archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 32 TNA E101/69/4/393; TNA E404/31/256; TNA E101/45/5 m.1; Ag Roll
Rerisby Nicholas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Rerisbury indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/4/379; TNA E404/31/443; TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Reston Richard Clerk of the royal household under investigation In 1415, Richard Reston indented to serve with four other clerks of the household, Thomas Bridde, Randolph Appulton, William Pek and Robert Allerton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/338 (with 4 others)
Reynold David yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, David Reynold indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Reynold Dederick Armourer under investigation In 1415, Dederick Reynold indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Rigmaiden Thomas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Thomas Rigmaiden indented to serve with four other esquires, John Osbaldeston, Nicholas Atherton, Gilbert Barton and Henry Skerbrick, with each man providing 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/284 (with four others) (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d;
Robessart Lewis Esquire Lewis Robessart (d. 1431) was the second son of Sir Thierry, a Hainault knight mentioned by Froissart. He became an esquire of Prince Henry and remained close to him throughout the king’s life, acting in personal negotiations with the French. He served on all the royal campaigns and became a knight of the Garter in 1421 as well as the king’s standard bearer. He was an executor of Henry V’s will. He married Elizabeth Bourchier widow of Sir Hugh Stafford (d. 1420) and was summoned to parliament from 1425 as Lord Bourchier. He died in France in 1431 in a skirmish near Amiens. He is buried in Westminster abbey, where his splendid tomb can still be seen. his elder brother Sir John also led a retinue on the campaign. In 1415, Lewis Robessart indented to serve with another esquire, John Butiller. Each man provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/3/366 (with John Butiller); TNA E404/31/290; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; Ag roll
Robessart John Knight John Robessart was the son of Thierry Robessart, a knight of Hainault. His brother Lewis who also served on the 1415 campaign as an esquire.He was described as a knight on 9 June 1396, and was retained by Henry IV in 1399 at £100 per annum, a grant confirmed by Henry V at his accession. He served on the 1416 campaign, and regularly in the conquest and occupation of Normandy into the 1440s. John was granted letters of denization on 20 October 1423 for good service to Henry IV and V. By 22 February 1438 he was described as a king’s knight and was given, together with a John Beket, the office of constable of the castle of Odiham. He was dead by 1447. In 1415 John Robessart, indented to serve along with 5 men-at-arms and 18 archers. All seem to have been at the battle. 24 TNA C 76/98 m. 20; TNA E404/31/257; TNA E101/45/5 m.3d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 19; TNA E101/44/30 m2;
Robyns John purveyor under investigation In 1415, John Robyns indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, William Hether, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, Henry Roundell, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Roos John, lord baron John (1396-1421) was the 8th baron de Ros of Helmsley, North Yorkshire. He continued to serve in France in the conquest of Normandy, and died at the battle of Baugé in March 1421 alongside his brother, William, and the duke of Clarence. He was buried at Belvoir Priory, then in Lincolnshire but now in Leicestershire. The abbey neighboured Belvoir Castle but was demolished following its dissolution in the sixteenth century. Ros’s retinue consisted of himself, 19 men-at-arms and 40 archers. Of these, 8 men-at-arms and 12 archers, together with 7 pages, presumably servants of the men-arms, were invalided home from the siege of Harfleur. Those who remained served at the battle with their leader. At the battle, Lord Ros seems to have been with the Duke of Gloucester, the Earl of Huntingdon in the centre portion of Henry V’s army. 60 TNA E404/31/321; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6; TNA E101/45/21 m. 40; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 14; Ag Roll
Rothington Robert Esquire under investigation In 1415, Robert Rothington indented to serve with another esquire, John Clifford. Each man provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/5/431 (with John Clifford); E404/31/343; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Roundell Henry purveyor under investigation In 1415, Henry Roundell indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, William Hether, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford, Symon Swan and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Roundell John Esquire John Roundell was clearly another household servant of some description and presumably one who had been present in the household for some time. Joan, wife of Henry IV and queen of England, had granted him the office of parker at Havering atte Bower (associated with the royal palace of Havering, historically in Essex, but now in the London borough of Havering), on 3 August, 5 Henry IV, so that he not be retained by anyone else for a wage of 3d daily. CPR 1408-1413, p. 213; CPR 1413-1416, pp. 51, 385 In 1415, John Roundell indented with another esquire, Gerard Huyn, with each man providing 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 6 TNA C76/98 m. 16, 15; TNA E404/31/353 (with Gerard Huyn); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Ruse John archer under investigation In 1415, John Ruse indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Ryder John Esquire A king’s esquire who, on 1 October 1413, was granted £23 6s 8d which Thomas Sprot, parson of the church of Burwell, was bound to render to the king at the Exchequer for Easter term last by virtue of a recognisance made by him in the Exchequer of Richard II and which have been levied from the sheriff of Cambridge for the king’s use. CPR 1413-1416, pp. 97-8 In 1415, John Ryder indented to serve with two other esquires, Robert Hunt and Stephen Ferrour, each of which provide 3 archers. Unfortunately, the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. 12 TNA E101/69/6/452 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/306; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d; Ag Roll
Sadeler Edward Cellarer under investigation In 1415, Edward Sadeler indented to serve with three other men, described as ‘cellarers’, Richard Beure, John Carbrok and John Hardyng. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others)
Sadelere William archer under investigation In 1415, William Sadelere indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Sadeller Thomas saddler under investigation In 1415, Thomas Sadeller indented to serve with four other archers, all saddlers in the royal household, William Tikhill, John Preston, William atte Halle and Richard Huden. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Salisbury Thomas Montague, earl of earl The father of Thomas (1388-1428) had been involved in a plot to murder Henry IV and his sons in January 1400, but Thomas proved a loyal supporter of the new regime, fighting in Wales and in France. Created a knight of the Garter in April 1414, he was involved in negotiations with the French a before serving on the Agincourt campaign. This was the beginning of an extensive military career in the campaigns of Henry V as well as after 1422. Indeed Salsibury was one of the leadning commanders under Henry VI, meeting his end in France as a result of canon shot during the siege of Orleans in 1428. His body was taken back to England; after a mass at St Paul’s on 29 November he was buried at Bisham Abbey, Berkshire, in accordance with his will. His second marriage was to Alice Chaucer, daughter of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer’s eldest son, Thomas who also served in 1415. Her first husband, Sir John Phelip, died at the siege of HArfleur, and the man who was to be her third husband, William de la Pole, eventually duke of Suffolk, was invalided home from the siege. Salisbury’s retinue in 1415 consisted of himself, 3 knights, 36 men-at-arms and 80 archers. All seem to have been at the battle. 120 TNA C76/98 m. 25, 18, 19A; TNA E404/31/174; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5d; TNA E101/45/21 m. 40
Samuon John yeoman messenger under investigation In 1415, John Samuon indented to serve with three other men, described as yeomen messagers of the king’s chamber, William Herryot, John Wodecok and John Herforth. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/412 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Sandbach Robert archer under investigation In 1415, Robert Sandbach indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Sandes Walter Knight Walter Sandes (1376-1435) had his main estates at Sherbourne and East Cholderton, Hampshire. Around the year 1401 he married Agnes, the only daughter of Thomas Warrener, a relative of Bishop Wykeham of Winchester. By October 1402 he had been knighted, when he sailed to Gascony in the retinue of Sir Matthew Gournay, seneschal of Les Landes. In June 1404 he served in a naval expedition commanded by Thomas, Lord Berkely, admiral of the west and in 1407 became a member of the garrison of Guines Castle. Sandes was appointed sheriff of Hampshire on 29 November 1410 and was elected to parliament the following year. In 1417-18 he participated in Henry V’s second expedition to France. He was made sheriff of Hampshire again on 13 November 1423 and was appointed as a commissioner of array in June 1424. He died on 17 June 1435. see ww.historyofparliamentonline.org. In 1415, Walter Sandes indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 12 TNA E101/69/5/435; TNA E404/31/349 TNA E101/45/5 m. 7;
Sanky John archer John Sankey was a Yeoman usher to the king’s hall which, although apparently a humble role, in May 1415 he was commissioned to fetch wood and other necessaries to the king’s hall, was clearly well rewarded. In October 1413 he was awarded the lands of Alice Sibill on the royal manor of Berkhamsted valued at 5 marks per year, in August 1414 John, with Walter Kendale, a yeoman of the king’s buttery, and Roger Martyn, were granted a third share of £40 forfeited by a Walter Whitchurche of Buckinghamshire for assaulting and wounding one John Palmer. He and Walter Kendale, benefited from the death at Harfleur of another household official, William Brauncepath whose annual fee of £10 was split between them. This was in addition to his payment of £20 as a valettus for his participation in the expedition in 1415. 28 May 1415 (CPR Hen V vol. 1, p. 330). For ‘his good and gratuitous service’, on 1 October 1413, he was granted all lands late of Isabel daughter of Alice Sibill within the liberty and lordship of Berkhamstead, pertaining to the king as escheat by the death of the said Isabel, tenant in chief, without heir and not exceeding the value of 5 marks year. (CPR Hen V vol. 1, p. 98). On 4 August 1414, he was granted a share of £40 (with Roger Martyn and Walter Kendale) which had been forfeited by a Walter Whitchurche of Buckinghamshire for assaulting and wounding one John Palmer. (CPR Hen V vol. 1, p. 219) In 1415, John Sanky indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, Richard Marchant, John Kerby, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 20; TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d;
Sanle Nicholas archer under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Sanle indented to serve with 7 other esquires, Griffin Percevale, William Smythson, John West, John Benyfeld, Roger Shermay, Thomas Berton and Matthew Bowre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/380 (with 7 others); TNA E404/31/320; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Sawer John Master gunner under investigation In 1415, John Sawer indented to serve with four other master gunners, Thomas Plum, John Charyng, George Brydlingytun and John Pegast. John Sawer was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/68/8/516 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9;
Saye Piers yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Piers Saye indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Scalder Gregory yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, Geoffrey Scalder, valettus, indented directly with the crown with, Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere – very likely Geoffrey’s brother – William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. . TNA E101/45/5 m. 3 (with 11 others)
Scaldere Henry yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, Henry Scalder, valettus, indented directly with the crown with Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Gregory Scalder – very likely Henry’s brother – William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Scarisbrick Henry Esquire Scarisbrick may have been knighted during the campaign In 1415, Henry Scarisbrick indented to serve with 5 other esquires, John Morley, Richard Tonneley, John Osbaldeston, Nicholas Atherton and Thomas Rigmaiden, each man supplying 2 archers. Unfortunately, the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. 3 TNA E101/69/6/473 (with 5 others); TNA E404/31/284; E101/45/5 m. 1d; TNA E358/6 rot 2d; Ag Roll
Scarlet Thomas Esquire under investigation In 1415, Thomas Scarlet indented to serve with three other esquires, William Hargrove, John Hargrove and Giles Thorndon. Each provided 3 archers but the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. TNA C76/98 m. 19A, 14; TNA E101/69/4/377 (with 3 others); TNA E404/31/293; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Scrop Richard Knight Little is known about Richard Scrope (d. 1419), although he was described as being ‘of Bolton’ (Yorkshire). His father, Sir Roger Scrope, had died by 14 December 1403, with the wardship of Richard granted to Queen Joan into whose keeping he passed. He served on the 1416 campaign to rescue Harfleur. He had died by 19 September 1419. It appears that this happened whilst he was preparing to travel to France for military service; as on 10 October 1419 a commission was granted to William Soper and John Clyve to take ships with sailors to the port of Southampton for the carriage of 120 horses of his horses, together with equipment, for transport to Normandy. In 1415, Richard Scrope indented to serve with 15 men-at-arms and 45 archers. One man-at-arms was killed during the siege of Harfleur (also 39 names invalided home). He was present with the rest of his retinue at the Battle of Agincourt and was later shipped back from Calais to England with 61 horses. 61 TNA E101/69/7/486A; TNA E404/31/267; TNA E101/45/5 m.4d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 40, TNA E101/45/22, m. 10; TNA E 358/6 rot 11; Ag Roll
Scrope Henry, lord baron Henry, third baron Scrope of Masham (c. 1376-1415), is remembered a conspirator in the Southampton Plot on the eve of Henry V’s departure for France. During his youth he gained some military experience overseas, receiving payment of £20 from Richard II in 1390 for his expenses in serving in Barbary, north Africa. He fought in the wars against Owain Glynd?r and at Shrewsbury in 1403. In 1410-11, when Prince Henry was in control of the government, he was Treasurer of England. In the lead up to war, he was active in diplomacy for Henry V and beyond personal and family connections with the other plotters, Richard, Earl of Cambridge and Sir Thomas Grey of Heton, his involvement is difficult to explain. Following his execution, his head was displayed on Micklegate Bar in York. Since Scrope’s will suggests that he had intended to be interred in York Minster and that he owned property in Micklegate itself, this was the ultimate humiliation. Some indication of Scrope’s status and closeness to the king can be seen in the size of his retinue: at 12- men it was much larger than for barons as a whole. He indented to serve with 3 knights, 26 men-at-arms and 90 archers. What became of them, and their involvement in the campaign after Scrope’s execution is not known but since some names appear in the Agincourt roll, it seems all or at least most went on the campaign and were at the battle. 120 TNA E101/69/4/384, 400; TNA E404/31/168; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3; Ag Roll
Selby John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Selby indented to serve with four other esquires, Bertram France, Henry Filongley, William Brancepath and Robert Brut. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 15 TNA E101/69/6/455 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/304; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; TNA E101/46/32
Semper Roger yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, Roger Semper indented to serve with William Bangor, Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Seveburgh William yeoman peyntour under investigation In 1415, William Seveburgh indented to serve with three other men, described as yeomen ‘peyntours’, John Duddyll, William Cookerham and Thomas Pope. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Seward John Chaplain under investigation In 1415, John Seward indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Sewy John Cleric of the revestry under investigation In 1415, John Sewy indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Sharpton William Clerk of the scullery under investigation In 1415, William Sharpton indented to serve with three other clerks, John Desye, John Hanham and John Breton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/361 (with 3 others)
Sherard Robert Esquire possibly the MP at http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/sherard-robert In 1415, Robert Sherard’s retinue consisted of himself and 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/5/419; TNA E404/31/365; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Shermay Roger archer under investigation In 1415, Roger Shermay indented to serve with 7 other esquires, Griffin Percevale, William Smythson, John West, John Benyfeld, Thomas Berton, Nicholas Sanle and Matthew Bowre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/380 (with 7 others); TNA E404/31/320; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Shipley Henry yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, Henry indented to serve with William Bangor, Thomas Tunbrigge, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille, Roger Semper and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Shirley Ralph Knight Ralph Shirley (1391-1443) of Lower Ettington Warwickshire, Shirley (Derbyshire) and Ratcliff-on Soar (Nottinghamshire) was only 12 when his father Sir Hugh was killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury in 1403 fighting for Henry IV. In 1414 he was appointed master forester of the honour of Leicester, confirming the strong link to the house of Lancaster. He served on the 1416 expedition to rescue HArfleur with 8 men-at-arms and 16 archers. In 1417, Shirley served on Henry V’s second expedition to France with a retinue of seven men-at-arms and 23 archers. He was present at the sieges of Louviers and Rouen and returned to England in early 1419. He was elected to represent Leicestershire at the parliament of 1420 and was appointed as sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire the same year, but seems to have withdrawn from pulbic affairs from 1423. He became involved in legal disputes over land with Humphrey, earl of Stafford. He died in 1443, possibly whilst overseas. www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Ralph Shirley indented to serve with five men-at-arms and 18 archers. One man-at-arms, John Huse, was killed at the siege of Harfleur. Shirley himself, together with two men-at-arms and six archers, was invalided home on 5 October. The remaining 15 men (3 men-at-arms and twelve archers) were present at the Battle of Agincourt, where one of the men-at-arms, Ralph Fowne, captured the duke of Bourbon. 24 TNA E404/31/175; TNA E101/45/5 m.2d; TNA E101/46/29; 30 partics; TNA E 358/6 rot 1
Shorne William yeoman of the household under investigation In 1415, William Shorne, valettus, indented directly with the crown with Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere, Gregory Scalder, William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Shorthale Oliver Valletus under investigation In 1415, Oliver Shorthale indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Richard Castell, William Petham, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Shottesbrook Robert Esquire On 24 March 1413 the king’s esquire Robert Shottesbrok was given 50 marks a year from the abbot, priory and convent of St. Augustine in Canterbury. He clearly survived the battle and was later knighted, serving as MP for Berkshire in 1423; Wiltshire 1426 and Berkshire in 1433 and 1439. Henry V made a further grant of 20 marks per year from the issues of the Duchy of Cornwall on 20 May 1416 in lieu of a grant given by the king when he was a prince dated 12 March 1408. He also received a gift of two pipes of wine yearly for the duration of five years on 27 January 1417. CPR 1413-6, pp. 9; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 46, 60 In 1415, Robert Shottesbrok’s retinue consisted of himself, another man-at-arms and 6 archers. It is unclear whether he fought at the battle or not. In the accounts he presented to the exchequer, he states that he, his 6 archers and 12 horses were delayed at Calais because of a shortage of shipping, but, unusually, he does not state whether or not he served at the battle. The fate of his other man-at-arms is not known, he was only paid for the first quarter of a year’s service. It is possible therefore, that he fell ill or died at Harfleur or, possibly, that he died at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/3/367; TNA E404/31/283; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d; TNA E101/46/28; 31
Shoylford Thomas Bowyer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Shoylford indented to serve with four other bowyers, Nicholas Frost, William Burton, William Swettoke and Robert Gyldeford. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/432 (with 4 others)
Shrowesby John archer under investigation In 1415, John Shrowesby indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Richard Hodell, John Weble, John Heggeman, John Dauson, John Hille, Robert Preston, John Peche, John de Saint Albans and Thomas Buntyngford. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Simmondeson John Master gunner under investigation In 1415, John Simmondeson indented to serve with five other master gunners, Hayne Joy, Reynold Willianis, Gerardo Vanwillighen, Henry Van Pruce and Bernardo Van Loon. John Simondesson was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/514 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Skade Arnold Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Arnold Skade indented to serve with five other master gunners, William Gerardesson, Walter Slotmaker, Godfrey Goykyn, Dederico Van Hesill and Dirk Bokelmaker. Arnold Skade was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle, but did serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/511 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9;
Skerbrick Henry Esquire under investigation In 1415, Henry Skerbrick indented to serve with four other esquires, John Osbaldeston, Nicholas Atherton, Gilbert Barton and Thomas Rigmaiden, with each man providing 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 15 TNA E404/31/284 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Skipton John Esquire Almost nothing is known of the service of John Skipton in 1415 which is only known through a letter of protection taken out by him. It is probable that he was not a soldier but a clerk employed in an administrative capacity. On 8 July 1413, John was appointed clerk of works, as deputy to John Strange, king’s clerk. CPR 1413-6, p. 59 In 1415, John Skipton indented to serve with two other esquires, Robert Bolron and John Ireby, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA E101/69/6/457 (with 2 others); TNA E404/31/270; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Skydemore (Scudamore) John Knight John Scudamore (d. 1434/5) was of a gentry family with lands centred on Kentchurch, on the Herefordshire-Monmouthshire border. He seems to have spent his early career in the service of the local lord, Gilbert, Lord Talbot. In 1397 he was elected to represent Herefordshire at the parliament and served as MP on further occasions in the 1410s and 20s. He married the daughter of Glyn Dwr but remained loyal to the crown and was heavily involved in the wars in Wales. by 1405 hewas in the service of Henry Prince of Wales by October 1405 by which point he had been knighted. He served on the 1416 campaign to rescue Harfleur. After further service in France in 1417-18 he returned to England where he was engaged in land disputes in Herefordshire in 1419 and 1422. In 1433 he was stripped of his royal offices in Wales as a (belated) result of his marriage to the daughter of Owen Glendower. He died at some point between May 1434 and December 1435. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org. In 1415, Sir John Scudamore indented to serve with three men-at-arms and 12 archers. The entire retinue was put into the garrison of Harfleur after the siege of the town. 16 TNA E404/31/285; TNA E101/45/5 m.1d; TNA E 358/6 rot 3
Skynnier Hugh yeoman of the wardrobe under investigation In 1415, Hugh Skynnier indented to serve with five other men, all described as yeomen of the great wardrobe, Roger Holbeth, William Curson, John Boston, Thomas Werkworth and Thomas White. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 (with 5 others)
Slotmaker Walter Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Walter Slotmaker indented to serve with five other master gunners, William Gerardesson, Godfrey Goykyn, Dederico Van Hesill, Arnold Skade and Dirk Bokelmaker. Walter Slotmaker was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town TNA E101/69/8/511 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9;
Smetheley Alexander archer Alexander Smetheley was a yeoman usher of the king’s hall who was commissioned for half a year to take wood, straw rushes and all other things pertaining to the office of usher of the hall of the household and carriage for the same on 26 June and 5 November 1413. On 28 May 1415 he was tasked with taking wood, litter, carriage, horses, saddles, carpenters, labourers and all other things necessary for the office of usher of the hall. He had died by January 1417, when his annual grant of 20 marks a year was redistributed. Alex Smetheley was employed as a valettus, a title usually given to archers, in 1415, but indented with the crown directly through his role as an usher of the hall of the royal household. Such a role could lead to reward: on April 7 1414, he was granted, along with another household servant, John Dent (also employed as an archer in 1415) the goods of Richard Watton of Windsor, chaplain, to the value of 25 marks within the counties of Berkshire and Buckingham, forfeited to the king because he had killed Robert Spandon of the same town, chaplain, and fled. CPR 1413-6, pp. 41, 115, 252, 330; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 60 In 1415, Alexander Smetheley indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, Richard Marchant, John Kerby, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 16; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d (with 11 others); TNA E404/31/326
Smith Thomas smith under investigation In 1415, Thomas Smith indented to serve with two other archers, all smiths in the royal household, William Ferro and Richard May. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Smyth John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Smyth indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Smyth John yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, John Smyth indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Smyth William Esquire and master under investigation In 1415, William Smith indented to serve with 41 valleti but no further details are known. No warrant for issue (an order to pay Smith and his retinue) survives so unfortunately, the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. 42 TNA E101/69/8/519 (with 41 others)
Smythson William archer under investigation In 1415, William Symthson indented to serve with 7 other esquires, Griffin Percevale, John West, John Benyfeld, Roger Shermay, Thomas Berton, Nicholas Sanle and Matthew Bowre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/380 (with 7 others); TNA E404/31/320
Snaythe Nicholas yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Snaythe indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Somercotes William archer under investigation In 1415, William Somercotes indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Jordan Workesley, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Southworth John Knight Little is known about John Southworth. On 22 March 1398 he was described as an esquire and son of Sir Thomas Southworth, when granted an annuity of 10 marks by Richard II. By 14 June 1403 he was described as a knight. In July of the same year he was one of a number of men commissioned to assemble soldiers in the county of Lancashire to assist the king in fighting Henry, earl of Northumberland, who was in rebellion. He died at Harfleur on 27 September 1415 five days after the town surrendered. Sir John Southworth indented to serve with one man-at-arms and 6 archers. He died at the siege on 27 September. The remainder of his retinue continued on the campaign and served at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/3/363; TNA E404/31/245; TNA E101/45/5 m.4; TNA E 358/6 rot 4
Spaldyng John archer A valettus of the scullery, on 28 May 1415, John Spaldyng was commissioned, for half a year, to ‘take coals, wood, bowls, pots, vessels and all other things necessary for the office of the scullery of the household and carpenters, labourers, horses and carriage as needed’ with John Philips, Richard Filongley, Thomas Swetenham, John Walsh and William Sharperton. This apparently lowly function does not necessarily indicate low status. His associate Thomas Swetenham was a member of a minor gentry family from Cheshire while Richard Filongley was probably the son of an esquire retained by Henry IV. In 1415, John Spaldyng, valettus, indented directly with the crown with Thomas Sweetenham, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere, Gregory Scalder, William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Spore Robert archer under investigation Robert Spore indented to serve as an archer, unfortunately, the surviving documents cannot tell us how many of these men fought at the battle and no details are known of their further service. 1 TNA E101/45/5 m. 3; TNA E404/31/340
Sprong Gerard gunner, Esquire Gerard Sprong was a specialist in the manufacture and use of artillery, who had been employed by Henry IV as well as Henry of Monmouth when the latter was Prince of Wales. Gerard had been present at the siege of Aberystwyth in 1407 where both the potential and the limitations of early gunpowder artillery were revealed. A gun named ‘The Messenger’ exploded but another, more successful, weapon succeeded in decapitating one of the leaders of the Welsh rebels within the castle. Despite the value attached to his service, Gerard was still attempting to collect full repayment for his services in providing the artillery used in the assaults on Aberystwyth and Harlech in 1407 and 1409-10 in January 1415. It may be in response to his petition relating to these expenses that he was awarded an annuity of £40 payable – otherwise quite out of proportion to his status as a ‘king’s esquire’ on the anniversary of Henry V’s coronation (21 March) on 25 March 1415. References to Gerard in the records are almost invariably concerned with the production of these new war machines and the enormous range of equipment and different variety of metal working skills, materials and labour required producing them. Gerard’s background is obscure, but it seems probable that he was either drawn from Germany or the Low Countries and may, therefore, been among the contacts made by Henry IV when, as Earl of Derby, he engaged in crusades to the Baltic in the 1390s. His indenture in 1415 calls him a gunner which downplays his status: Gerard was a man of immense importance for Henry V’s campaign in 1415. The technology which he understood was to play a vital role in the capture of Harfleur and, increasingly, in the conduct of war in general in the fifteenth century and beyond. Gerard Sprong appears to have been the commander of the twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition, each of whom received 12d per day and were served by two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle, but did serve as the captain of the gunners left in the garrison of the town. According to his indenture he indented to serve with four archers, but no further details of their service is known 5 TNA E101/69/476; TNA E404/31/176; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E358/6
Sprotte John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Sprotte indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Wryght, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Squyer John Labourer under investigation In 1415, John Squyer indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Standish Hugh Knight Relatively little is known about the Lancashire knight Hugh Standish (probably of Duxbury). On 2 July 1398 he was retained by Richard II for £10 per annum but he subsequently supported the house of Lancaster. In 26 January 1415, 150 men-at-arms, 300 archers and 360 mariners were sent to sea from the port of London on the king’s service in the company of Gilbert, Lord Talbot, Hugh Standish and John Burgh, esquire, in the port of London. But he indented for the land campaign on 29 April. He may have died in 1421. In 1415, Hugh Standish indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 12 TNA E404/31/177; TNA E101/45/5 m1; TNA E101/45/20, m. 28
Stanley John Esquire esquire in the special issue roll, but subsequently knighted. possibly Sir John Stanley 1386-1437 In 1415, John Stanley’s retinue consisted of himself, 7 men-at-arms and 24 archers in addition to 50 archers from Lancashire, part of the king’s personal estates. One ‘valettus’ – which might mean a servant or an archer in this instance – was among those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England, as was Henry de Scarisbrick a man at arms ‘with monsieur Johan Stanley’ suggesting John might have been knighted during the campaign. 32 TNA C76/98 m. 19A; TNA E404/31/316; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8; TNA E101/45/1
Stanley Robert Esquire On 13 January 1413 Robert Stanley, one of the king’s esquires, was granted an annuity of £20 from the petty customs in the port of London. CPR 1408-1413, p. 460 In 1415, Robert Stanley indented to serve with 2 archers but no further details of their service is known. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/4/410; TNA E404/31/382; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d;
Starky William archer under investigation In 1415, William Starky indented to serve with seven other archers, Thomas Hervy, Thomas Ernysoy, Roger Martyn, Richard Hunt, John Base, John Compton and William Clerk. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/305 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d
Staunton Thomas Esquire In January and February 1415 the king’s esquire Thomas Staunton was granted the keeping of the lands of two wards of the crown to the value of 18 marks a year. CPR 1413-6, pp. 278, 388 In 1415, Thomas Staunton indented to serve with four other esquires, Robert Gloucestre, William FitzHarry, John Folville and William Hodilston, each of which provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 7; TNA E101/69/6/471 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/292;
Staveley Ralph Knight Ralph Staveley (1362-c. 1420) had his main seat at Staveley, Cheshire, but served as MP for Lancashire in 1404 and 1407. In September 1386, when he was about 24 years old, he gave testimony in the Scrope v. Grosvenor dispute. He later accompanied Henry Bolingbroke on his expedition to Prussia in 1390 and acted as his steward. In 1392 he was granted an annuity of 10 marks a year by Gaunt. Staveley once again accompanied Bolingbroke to Prussia in 1393. After the exile of the latter, in September 1398, he was retained by Richard II for £20 per annum. Despite this, he supported Bolingbroke on his return to England in 1399. After the accession of Henry IV to the throne, he was rewarded with an additional grant of £40 per annum. In 1406, he also took service with Henry Prince of Wales in the war in Wales. He had died by 1420, and it seems unlikely that he saw further military service after 1415. see www.historyofparliamentonlin.org In 1415, Ralph Staveley indented to serve with three archers and 12 archers. All seem to have been at the battle He also was in command of a company of 50 archers from Lancashire. 16 TNA C 76/98 m. 15; TNA E101/69/6/461; TNA E404/31/227; TNA E101/45/5 m.4d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 24; TNA E 358/6 rot 2 (lancs archers)
Steward John Esquire not certain whether this is the later Sir John Steward/Stuard In 1415, John Steward’s retinue consisted of himself, 3 men-at-arms and 12 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 16 TNA E101/69/4/401; TNA E404/31/268;TNA E101/45/5 m. 3d; Ag roll
Stok John archer under investigation In 1415, John Stok indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, William Petham, Thomas Holme and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Stokley William Esquire William Stokley was granted an annuity of £10 by Richard II on November 1396 and another grant of £10 on January 1399; these were confirmed by Henry IV on 5 November 1399 and Henry V on 12 June 1413. CPR 1399-1403; CPR 1413-6, pp. 75 In 1415, William Stokley indented to serve with 2 archers but no further of details are known. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E 101/69/7/485; TNA E404/31/387; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8
Storgeon Nicholas Chaplain under investigation In 1415, Nicholas Storgeon indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
St-Pée-de-Nivelle Juan d’Amezqueta, sire de lord (Gascon) Juan d’Amezqueta, sire de Seintpee, was a lord from Gascony (more specifically Laborde in the Basque country) In 1415, Johan d’Amezqueta, sire de Seintpee indented to serve with nineteen men-at-arms, 20 crossbowmen on horseback and 80 crossbowmen on foot. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we have to assume he was at the battle with his men. 120 TNA E404/31/315
Strange Ivill Esquire under investigation In 1415, Ivill Strange indented to serve with 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E101/69/6/470; TNA E404/31/429; TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 d.
Strauley Hugh Esquire under investigation In 1415, Hugh Strauley indented to serve with 3 archers but no further details of their service is known. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/4/394; TNA E404/31/421; TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 (with 5 others)
Strikland Thomas Esquire Thomas (d. 1455) The eldest son of Sir Walter Strickland (d. 1407), and from Sizergh, Westmorland. He fought for Henry IV at the battle of Shrewsbury and received royal reward. In 1410 and 1414 he was appointed sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire. He was knighted by 1 April 1418, and served in the conquest of Normandy at least until the early months of 1419. He was MP for Westmorland in 1404, 1429 and 1431. He carried the banner of St George at the battle.see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Thomas Strikland’s retinue consisted of himself with another man-at-arms and 6 archers. He was not paid a regard because he was included as a member of the royal household. He and his retinue fought at and survived the battle. he carried the standard of St George at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/5/411; TNA E404/31/372; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d; TNA E101/46/27; TNA E358/6 rot 5; Ag roll
Sturgeons John archer under investigation In 1415, John Sturgeons indented to serve with one other man, John Hurlebatte, both described as being yeomen companions of the royal household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 2 TNA E404/31/422; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Suffolk Michael de la Pole snr, earl of earl Perhaps because of the accusations of treason levelled at his father in the 1380s and the subsequent forfeiture of his estates, Michael de la Pole (1367/8-1415) had formed a career in arms. He joined a crusade in Lithuania in 1391, campaigned with Henry IV in Scotland in 1400, and in the same year provided troops for the defence of the channel. Later he participated in naval operations in person, and went abroad on the king’s service between December 1408 and August 1409, acting as the senior English representative at the Council of Pisa. He acted as one of the principal captains to Thomas, duke of Clarence, on his campaign through France to Gascony in 1412–13. It was natural, therefore that he joined the expedition in 1415, dying of dysentery at Harfleur. His body was shipped home to England and buried, as he had requested in his will, at Wingfield, Suffolk where his tomb survives, while his son, Michael, died at the battle itself. In 1415, the earl of Suffolk indented to serve with a retinue of 159 men, consisting of himself, 2 knights, 36 men-at-arms and 120 archers. Of these, 8 men-at-arms, including his younger son William, were invalided home from Harfleur with 3 archers. Following the earl’s death at the siege on 17 September 1415, 11 men-at-arms and 21 archers were placed in the garrison at Harfleur, while 2 men-arms and 4 archers accompanied the earl’s body to England on 4 October 1415. The fate of those of the earl’s retinue that left Harfleur for Calais is known in some detail thanks to the post campaign financial records. One man-at-arms and an archer were captured by the French on 8 October. Those that fought at the battle consisted of 2 knights, 34 men-at-arms and 80 archers. One of the archers, Edmund Bland, captured a French prisoner worth 21 shillings in ransom. Return shipping was provided for 2 knights, 25 men-at-arms and 110 archers, suggesting some losses of men-at-arms at the battle but a reorganisation of retinues giving the earl’s former company more archers. 160 TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA E404/31/178; TNA E101/45/5 m3; E101/45/20 m. 17; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 11; TNA E101/46/24; E358/6; rot 2; Ag Roll
Sugewas John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Sugewas indented to serve with 3 archers, but no further details are known regarding their service 4 TNA E404/31/350; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Swan Symon purveyor under investigation In 1415, Symon Swan indented to serve with eleven other archers, all purveyors in the royal household, William Grene, William Medway, William Hether, Richard Clopham, Thomas Clovn, John Michel, Henry Roundell, John Robyns, Hankyn Michell, John Brigford and Hugh Barton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7
Sweetenham Thomas yeoman of the household Thomas Swetenham was from Cheshire and his family must have originated from the village of that name. Other members of the family had served with the Black Prince in Gascony and one of Thomas’s relatives (the exact nature of the relation is not known), Matthew Swetenham was prominent both in Northamptonshire and in the court of Richard II though he held lands in Cheshire and in 1394 was in receipt of the revenues of the ferry at Conwy in north Wales. Thomas, however, seems to have been from Mobberley, near Knutsford, in east Cheshire and died (according to the genealogy in East Cheshire Past and Present by Rev. J.P. Earwaker, London, 1877) in 1425. This genealogy, based on later documents is clearly incomplete and fails to link all the branches of the family recorded in fourteenth and fifteenth century documents. The heraldic arms of the family granted to one Laurence Sweetenham in 1568-9 do not belong to this period. Thomas is said to have married Alice or Elizabeth, daughter of John le Ward. In 1415, Thomas Sweetenham, valettus, indented directly with the crown with, John Spaldyng, John Walsh, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere, Gregory Scalder, William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. 12 TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Swettoke William Bowyer under investigation In 1415, William Swettoke indented to serve with four other bowyers, Nicholas Frost, William Burton, Robert Gyldeford and Thomas Shoylford. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/432 (with 4 others)
Swillington John Esquire under investigation In 1415, John Swillington indented to serve with another three men-at-arms and 12 archers. Of which 5 archers and 2 servants from it were among those who fell ill at Harfleur and were given leave to return to England. The remainder presumably fought at the battle since there is no record of Swillington, or anyone associated with him, being placed in the garrison at Harfleur 16 TNA E404/31/228; TNA E101/45/1 m. 1; TNA E101/45/1
Swynford Norman yeoman of the poultry under investigation In 1415, Norman Swynford indented to serve with three other men, all described as yeomen of the king’s poultry, John Bekuyffeld, William Manfeld and John Ponde. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E404/31/366 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d
Symond Robert Armourer under investigation In 1415, Robert Symond indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Lowys Fox, William Butte, William Werwik, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
Talbot Gilbert, lord baron Gilbert Talbot (1383-1419), elder brother of the more famous John Talbot, later earl of Shrewsbury, had grown up in the service of Henry V while the latter was Prince of Wales, and particpated in the Welsh wars. He was fully active in the French campaigns, dying at the siege of Rouen in March, 1419. In 1415, Gilbert indented to serve with 2 knights, 27 men-at-arms and 90 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were all present at the battle. 120 TNA E404/31/179; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2; Ag Roll
Talbot William Knight It assumed that this is William Talbot (d. 1429) of Botus Fleming, Cornwall, although his biography produced by the Hiastory of Parliament Trust does not mention hsi 1415 service. This Sir William served in Richard II’s expeditions to Ireland in 1394 and 1399. In the reign of Henry IV and Henry V he received appointments in Cornwall as JP (1403, 1410, 1414, 1419), sheriff (1409, 1415, 1416) and escheator (also for Devon, 1405, 1417). He was also elected to represent Cornwall in the parliaments of 1402 and November 1414. He died shortly before 1 April 1429. see www.historyofparliamentonline.otg In 1415, Sir William Talbot indented to serve with three men-at-arms and 12 archers. Six archers were invalided home during the siege of Harfleur. Talbot and the rest of his retinue were present at the Battle of Agincourt. 16 TNA E404/31/334; TNA E101/45/5 m.8; TNA E101/45/20, m. 18; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 13; TNA E101/45/1; TNA E101/46/25, 26 ; TNA E 358/6 rot 8; Ag Roll
Tempest Richard Knight Richard Tempest (c. 1356-1427/8) had his seat at Bracewell and Waddington, Yorkshire. According to the testimony he gave in the Scrope versus Grosvenor dispute in 1386, he first took up arms in 1371 when he was 15 years old, in service against the Scots. In 1377 he accompanied John, Lord Neville, in an expedition to relieve the city of Bordeaux. Later he joined John of Gaunt’s expedition to Scotland in 1383 and in 1385 was given joint-command of the garrison of Roxburgh Castle. Tempest participated in Richard II’s expedition to Scotland in 1385, where he provided a retinue of 40 men-at-arms and 80 archers. The following year he was appointed keeper of the castle of Berwick-upon-Tweed. He supported Henry IV upon his return to England, and, despite receiving an annuity of 20 marks from the earl of Northumberland, stayed loyal to the king during the Percy rebellion of 1403. In the same year he was in the service of Henry Prince of Wales with a contingent of 72 men fighting the rebels in Wales. The following year he was elected to represent Yorkshire at parliament. After 1415 he does not seem to have performed further military service. He made his will in August 1427 and had died by 1428. www.historyofparliamentonlin.org. In 1415, Richard Tempest indented to serve with five men-at-arms and 18 archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 24 TNA E101/69/5/430; TNA E404/31/407; TNA E101/45/5 m.9d
Temple William Master carpenter under investigation In 1415, William Temple indented to serve with another master carpenter, Thomas Mathew. Each man was to provide 59 other carpenters for a total force of 120 men. What happened to this group is uncertain. 60 TNA E101/69/518 (with Thomas Mathew); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10
Thorndon Giles Esquire under investigation In 1415, Giles Thorndon indented to serve with three other esquires, John Hargrove, William Hargrove and Thomas Scarlet. Each provided 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA C76/98 m. 19A, 14; TNA E101/69/4/377 (with 3 others); TNA E404/31/293; TNA E101/45/5 m. 2
Thornton William archer under investigation In 1415, William Thornton indented to serve with four other archers, John Weddesbury, Philip Gilder, John Hemyngburgh and Robert Killesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/399 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d
Thorp Thomas archer Thomas Thorp, described as a king’s servant, was given a life grant of 5 marks per year by the hands of the chamberlain of Caernarvon on 24 April 1418, in lieu of a similar grant given to Thorp when the king was Prince of Wales. CPR 1413-16, pp. 106 In 1415, Thomas Thorp indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Kyrton, William Gryse, Alexander Smetheley, William Malthowse, John Sanky, Thomas Thorp, John Peterburgh, John Elys, Richard Marchant, John Kerby, Robert Castelton, and John Bukenham. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/45/5 m. 6d (with 11 others); TNA E404/31/326
Tikhill William saddler under investigation In 1415, William Tikhill indented to serve with four other archers, all saddlers in the royal household, John Preston, Thomas Sadeller, William atte Halle and Richard Huden. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 5 TNA E404/31/347 (with 4 others)
Tiptoft John Knight John Tiptoft (d. 1443) of Burwell, Cambridgeshire, was a member of the household of Henry Bolingbroke and joined the latter into exile. He was knighted on the eve of Henry IV’s coronation of Henry IV in 1399,and later in the year was retained as a king’s knight for an annual fee of 100 marks. he served in arms at the batle of Shrewsbury and in Wales. He also had a distinguished career in parliament as MP for Huntingdonshire om three occasions and Somerset on one (having acquired substantial properties there through marriage), and was speaker in 1406. On 8 December 1406 he was appointed Treasurer of the Household, a position which he held until 17 July 1408. In April 1415 he was appointed seneschal of Aquitaine: it was for a force to go there that he indented in 1415, and he was not therefore at agincourt. But he served on the 1416 campaign and thereafter had a full military and diplomatic career in Henry V’s wars in Normandy and Gascony. After the death of Henry V in 1422, Tempest was appointed to the council of Henry VI, a position he held for the rest of his life, where he was style a banneret with a salary of £100. He served in Henry VI’s coronation expedition to France in 1430, where he indented to provide a retinue of 35 men-at-arms and 105 archers. Six years later he took part in the duke of Gloucester’s expedition to relieve Calais, with a retinue of 16 men-at-arms and 69 archers. He died on 30 January 1443. www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Tiptoft indented to serve with two knights, 77 men-at-arms and 400 archers. They were not present at the Battle of Agincourt as they served in the Duchy of Gascony. 480 C 61/116 m. 5; TNA E404/31/354; TNA E101/45/5 m11;
Tirwhit William Esquire William (d. 1451) of Wrawby Lincs and Thorgumbald Yorkshire was knighted by July 1418 and served in the conquest of Normandy, being appointed to several key commands and offices. He returned to England from 1423. He served as MP for Lincolnshire in 1416, 1423 and 1426. see www.historyofparliamentonline.org. In 1415, William Thirwhit’s retinue consisted of himself and 3 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 4 TNA E101/69/4/402: TNA E404/31/388; ; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8
Tollo Dederico gunner under investigation Dederico Tollo was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Topcliffe John Esquire John Topcliff was granted 12d per day by Henry IV on 12 August 1403, which was confirmed by Henry V on 12 June 1413. He was described as a serjeant of arms on 28 February 1410, when he was appointed to proclaim the truce between England and the Spanish kingdoms of Castile and Leon from the mouth of the Thames to the north. In April 1415 he was one of three serjeant of arms charged with arresting thirteen men and bringing them into the presence of the king. He evidently survived the Agincourt campaign as he was later tasked with arresting ships for further expeditions to France in May 1416 and April 1418. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 180; CPR 1413-16, pp. 75, 345; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 72, 199 In 1415, John Topcliff’s retinue consisted of himself and 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA C76/98 m. 21; TNA E404/31/180; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4
Tropenell William sergeant tailor William Tropenell was described as a esquire and servitor on 10 April 1413 when he was appointed to the office of serjeant of the king’s robes. In November of the same year he was granted tenements in the parish of St. Michael atte Corne in London to the value of £10 per year. Henry V also gifted him a house at Bainard’s Castle on 1 October 1414. He may have been a relative of one Walter Tropenell, possibly of Lyme Regis, Dorset who was MP for the town on no fewer than eight occasions between 1377 and 1391. CPR 1413-16, pp. 62, 147, 232 In 1415, William indented to serve as sergeant tailor of the Great wardrobe and to provide two archers and 6 valets of office (that is, other tailors). 1 of these valets, John Boston, died at Harfleur, while William himself together with 4 of the remaining valets – all of whom are named in his particulars of account – fell ill and were thus invalided home. The remaining men, however, 2 archers and a valet remained to fight at the battle. 9 TNA E101/45/5 m. 10; TNA E101/46/37; ; TNA E358/6 rot 5d;
Troutbeck William Esquire William Troutbeck was appointed as Chamberlain of Chester on 27 October 1413. Given that he was the Chamberlain – or chief financial and deputy governmental official – of the king’s earldom of Chester at the time and that the earldom included the county of Flint in north Wales which was only recently free of Owain Glyndwr’s rebellion, it is probable that this payment related to archers recruited from Cheshire and that Troutbeck himself never left England. He was later tasked with taking the muster of soldiers and sailors hired for the safe-keeping of the sea under the command of Thomas, duke of Exeter on 24 March 1416. Six years later, on 4 July 1422 he was instructed by advice of the council to receive eight French prisoners from the Tower of London and to escort them to Flint Castle. CPR 1413-16, pp. 140, 344; CPR 1416-1422, pp. 199, 446 In 1415, William Troutbeck indented to serve with two knights, 47 esquires and 150 archers, with the latter described as being from the county of Cheshire. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. it is possible that a larger number of archers served from the county. Nicolas History of the Battle of Agincourt (3rd edn, 1833) p. 385 from BL Sloane 4600 claims there were 650 archers. 200 TNA E404/31/398; SC6/776/4 m. 3d-4d; E 403/629 m.3; E 403/624 m. 12;
Trumpington Roger Knight Relatively little is known about Roger Trumpington (Trumpington is south of Cambridge), but he already held an annuity from Gaunt before 1399. He was a knight by February 1401 when he was given a royal annuity of 100 marks per annum. His annuity from the Exchequer was confirmed by Henry V on 13 October 1413 but three days later was replaced by the grant of the custody of the prior of St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall. He had died by 8 June 1416 (TNA C 139/153 no 19). It appears that he had undertaken military service at sea, as his late wife, Margaret, on 14 May 1417, was excused for accounting for military wages he had received, on account of the ‘great losses’ he had sustained at sea. His service on the 1416 campaign to relieve Harfleur cannot be proved, however. In 1415, Roger Trumpington indented to serve with two men-at-arms and nine archers. Four servants were invalided home from the siege of Harfleur but it seems that the knight and his retinue were at the battle. 12 TNA C 76/98 m. 12, 21; TNA E101/69/6/474; TNA E404/31/259; TNA E101/45/5 m4; TNA E101/45/21, m. 34; TNA E101/45/1
Trygg Thomas Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Trygg indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, William Wylde, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Tunbrigge Thomas yeoman of the household Thomas Tonbrigge is described either as the ‘king’s servitor’ or, ‘yeoman of the kitchen for the king’s mouth’. As such he was a personal servant of the king responsible for serving his food and although his indenture in 1415 describes him as a ‘valettus’, which can mean an archer, those he indented with can generally be identified as servants in the king’s household: it is unlikely that he was a soldier. Such offices, with their proximity to the king, could yield rewards far removed from their apparent lowly status. Thomas was no exception for, in July 1414, he was granted a ship called la Meremayde (The Mermaid), then lying at Rotherhithe with all its gear. This ship was, in itself, of little pracytical use having been largely destroyed by fire but the remains were values at 10 marks (£6 9s, a relatively substantial sum). At the same time Thomas was granted the office – and therefore the revenues of the office of water bailiff in Bristol.29 July 1414, g(CPR Hen V vol. 1, p. 232) In 1415, Thomas indented to serve with William Bangor, Hugh Bigge, Roger Chich, Henry Shipley, Thomas Hampton, Richard Burton, John Botiller, John Norfolk, John Hille, Roger Semper, and John Birkyn. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. 12 TNA C76/98 m. 18; TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 3;
Tunneley Richard Esquire under investigation In 1415, Richard Tunneley indented to serve with one other esquire John Morley, each of which provided 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/6/473 (with John Morley); TNA E101/45/5 m. 1d; TNA E404/31/281
Tunstall Thomas Knight Thomas Tunstall (1380- 1441) held Thurland near Kirby Lonsdale in the Lune valley, which he got the right to fortify in 1402. In 1397 he was appointed to various commissions in the counties of Westmoreland and Lancashire. Later in November 1399 he was described as a king’s sergeant-at-arms. On 16 January 1414 he was appointed JP for Westmoreland. He served on the expedition of 1431 and possibly on other occasions in France, and died in 1441. In 1415, Thomas Tunstall indented to serve with five men-at-arms and 18 archers, all of whom seem to have been at the battle. He also commanded a company of archers from Lancashire. 24 TNA C 76/98 m. 22; TNA E101/69/7/484; TNA E404/31/181; TNA E101/45/5 m.4d; TNA E101/45/21, m. 7; TNA E 358/6 rot 2 (Lancs archers)
Tyndesley Roger yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Roger Tyndesley indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Ufflete (Usflete) Gerard Knight Ufflete was the son of Sir Gerard Ufflete (d. 1406) of North Ferriby and Ouseflete (presumably the origin of the surname), Yorkshire, who was MP for Yorkshire in 1401. On 5 July 1405 Gerard junior was pardoned for involvement in the rebellion of Henry, earl of Northumberland but in 1408 he was suspected of pro-Percy leanings and was ordered to be arrested. By that year he had married Elizabeth, the daughter of Richard Fitzalan, earl of Arundel, and widow of Thomas Mowbray, duke of Norfolk. Having proved himself loyal he served as steward of the Duchy of Lancaster estates in Lincolnshire, and also served on the 1416 campaign to rescue Harfleur and in the conquest of Normandy. He died in 1421. In 1415, Gerard Ufflete indented to serve with 19 men-at-arms and 60 archers. One servant was invalided home from the siege of Harfleur but the knight and his retinue seem to have been at the battle. 80 TNA E404/31/246; TNA E101/45/5 m.2d; TNA E101/45/1; Ag Roll
Umfraville Gilbert Knight Though sometimes styled ‘earl of Kyme’ because he was a descendent of Maud countess of Angus, the title had no official status. An energetic warrior, Gilbert Umfraville (1390-1421) of Harbottle, Hessle and Kyme took part in the English expedition to France under the earl of Arundel in 1411, distinguishing himself in the Anglo-Burgundian victory at St Cloud on 10 November 1411. The campaign had been planned by Prince Henry, with whom Gilbert became closely associated. A knight of the king’s chamber in 1413, he was bequeathed a golden bowl in Henry V’s will of 1415. Having fought at Harfleur and Agincourt, he took part in a number of the sieges that marked the subjugation of Normandy 1417-19, including that of Rouen, where he was prominent in the negotiations preceding the surrender of the city. He died, with Thomas, duke of Clarence, at the Battle of Baugé in March 1421. In 1415, Gilbert Umfraville indented to serve with 29 men-at-arms and 90 archers. All seem to have been at the battle. 120 TNA E101/69/6/480; TNA E404/31/233; TNA E101/45/5 m.5
Urswick Robert Knight Robert Urswick, of Upper Rawcliffe, Lancashire, was son of Sir Robert (d. 1402), who also succeeded his father in the office of master forester of Amoundeness. He was sheriff of Lancashire in 1415-16, and served on the campaign as leader of 500 archers from Lancashire. He died in 1420. For his father see www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, Robert Urswick indented to serve with 500 archers from Lancashire. The post campaign enrolled account speaks of these archers as being a bodyguard for Henry V. 501 TNA E101/45/5 m8d, 10; TNA 358/6 rot 2 (Lancs archers);
Vale John Esquire John Vale was described as a king’s esquire on 8 February 1415 when Henry V granted him £20 per annum from the revenues of the alien priory of Lapley, Staffs. 8 February 1415, this was confirmed on 19 June 1415 as part of the priory’s dissolution. CPR 1413-1416, pp. 281, 335. In 1415, the king’s esquire John Vale indented to serve with 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA E101/69/4/390; TNA E404/31/430; TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 d
Van Hesill Dederico Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Dederico Van Hesill indented to serve with five other master gunners, William Gerardesson, Walter Slotmaker, Godfrey Goykyn, Arnold Skade and Dirk Bokelmaker. Dederico Van Hesill was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town TNA E101/69/8/511 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9;
Van Loon Bernardo Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Bernardo Van Loon indented to serve with five other master gunners, Hayne Joy, John Simmondeson and Reynold Willianis. Bernardo Van Loon was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/514 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Van Pruce Henry Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Henry Van Pruce indented to serve with five other master gunners, Hayne Joy, John Simmondeson, Reynold Willianis and Bernardo Van Loon. Henry Van Pruce was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/514; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Van Rosty Calis Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Calis Van Rosty indented to serve with five other master gunners, Dederico Plomaker, Gerardo Van Vengarde, William Cutteller, Dederico de Vere and Petro Clusman. Calis Van Rosty was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/512 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9 ;
Van Vengarde Gerardo Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Gerardo Van Vengarde indented to serve with five other master gunners, Dederico Plomaker, William Cutteller, Dederico de Vere, Petro Clusman and Calis Van Rosty. Gerardo Van Vengarde was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/512; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Vanwillighen Gerardo Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Gerardo Vanwillighen indented to serve with five other master gunners, Hayne Joy, John Simmondeson, Reynold Willianis, Henry Van Pruce and Bernardo Van Loon. Gerardo Vanwillighen was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/512 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9 ;
Veyse Thomas yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Thomas Veyse indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Walche William yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, William Walche indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Waleys Thomas Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Waleys indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Thomas Westerdale, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Walsh John archer John Walsh was a member of the royal household and may well have been from Kent – a man of this name failed to contest a debt there in 1413. A valettus of the scullery, on 28 May 1415, he was commissioned, for half a year, to ‘take coals, wood, bowls, pots, vessels and all other things necessary for the office of the scullery of the household and carpenters, labourers, horses and carriage as needed’ with John Philips, Richard Filongley, Thomas Swetenham, John Spaldyng and William Sharperton. This apparently lowly function does not necessarily indicate low status. His associate Thomas Swetenham was a member of a minor gentry family from Cheshire. John Walsh, valettus, indented directly with the crown with Thomas Sweetenham, John Spaldyng, John Bamebury, Richard Filongley, William Alcock, John Mikelfield, Henry Scaldere, Gregory Scalder, William Shorne, Richard Breuster and Ralph Passenham. All were paid £20 each as ‘valetti’, which would normally suggest that they were archers but the size of the sum of money involved here suggests that they were members of the king’s household. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle, serving as archers. TNA E404/31/322 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m.3;
Walsh Thomas archer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Walsh indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, William Petham, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Walver Thomas Chaplain under investigation In 1415, Thomas Walver indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, John Wobury, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Ward Thomas Esquire Thomas Ward, esquire, was one of eighteen named men who were alleged by Thomas, bishop of Durham, to have broken his close at Walkington in Yorkshire in 1412. On 8 March the king’s esquire Nicholas Holand was given a grant of 20 marks a year at the hands of the chamberlain of Carmarthen in lieu of a life grant to the king’s esquire Thomas Warde which was surrendered by letters patent. In May of 1415 he was recorded as not appearing in court regarding an outstanding debt of £13 12s 6d owed to two citizens and mercers of London. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 430; CPR 1413-16, pp. 164, 311 In 1415, Thomas Ward’s retinue consisted of himself and 2 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 3 TNA C76/98 m. 20; TNA E101/69/6/468; TNA E404/31/376; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8
Waterton John Esquire Hugh (d. 1409) and John Waterton were sons of the prominent Lincolnshire landowner, William Waterton, and members of that branch of the family which had lived at the now-deserted village of Waterton on the Isle of Axholme from the mid-12th century onwards. Though there were at least two other men named John Waterton active in the first ten years of the fifteenth century, all closely related, the John Waterton who indented to serve in France in April 1415 was among the most important of the king’s retainers and officials. He had been receiver – the chief financial officer – for Henry’s duchy of Cornwall between 1400 and Henry’s becoming king in 1413. Given that both Henry IV and his son were singularly short of money and that the prince’s income was greatly reduced owing to the rebellion in Wales and the effects upon his earldom of Chester, the monies extracted from Cornwall formed the bulk of the Henry’s income when he was Prince of Wales. The man in charge of them therefore needed to be both trustworthy and capable. John was clearly both and followed in a tradition of service to the House of Lancaster. Waterton began his career in the service of John of Gaunt, although no specific references survive to his activities on behalf of the house of Lancaster until August 1399 when he was sent to Ireland to buy horses for Henry of Bolingbroke, the future King. It is interesting to note, however, that in 1402 the latter pardoned him a debt of £10, owing from the time of ‘our journey to Prussia’ (1391), so their connexion was evidently of long standing. NB, although he indented to serve in 1415, his expenses demonstrate that he was sent abroad on diplomatic duties to Aragon and did not return until 1416. In Henry V’s will, he was bequeathed all of the horses not specifically left to any of the other members of Henry’s circle. This interesting bequest may reflect a John’s personal affinity for horses. John had his time as master of the king’s horses between 1413 and 1416. See www.historyofparliamentonline.org In 1415, John Waterton indented to serve with 7 other men-at-arms and 24 archers. His expenses for this year indicate, however, that Waterton himself was engaged in diplomatic duties in the Iberian kingdom of Aragon rather than in France, but there is evidence that, despite this, his retinue was part of the expedition. 2 men-at-arms and 5 archers, together with 2 servants were among those who fell ill at Harfleur and were given leave to return to England. While it is likely that the remainder fought at the battle, the surviving documents provide no information on the nature of their service. 32 TNA C76/98 m. 14; TNA E404/31/367; 441; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7; TNA E101/45/1; Ag roll
Wayn Robert Fletcher under investigation In 1415, Robert Wayn indented to serve with five other fletchers, Robert Michell, William Hersegaunt, John Cowpere, John Morys and Simon Chaunge. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/436 (with 5 others)
Weble John smith under investigation In 1415, John Weble indented to serve with nine other archers, all smiths in the royal household, Richard Hodell, John Heggeman, John Dauson, John Hille, Robert Preston, John Peche, John de Saint Albans, Thomas Buntyngford and John Shrowesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Weddesbury John archer under investigation In 1415, John Weddesbury indented to serve with four other archers, William Thornton, Philip Gilder, John Hemyngburgh and Robert Killesby. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 5 TNA E404/31/399 (with 4 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 8d
Wembre John archer Possibly the John Wemme (note spelling), who was granted 6d daily 21 November 1399, a grant renewed by Henry V 25 June 1413. CPR 1413-1416, p. 152. In 1415, John Wembre indented to serve by himself as an archer. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume he was present at the battle. 1 TNA E404/31/368; TNA E101/45/5 m. 8;
Wendone Henry yeoman of the bakehouse under investigation In 1415, Henry Wendone indented to serve with seven other men, described as yeomen of the bakehouse, Nicholas Burcestre, Ralph Morley, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Keynesham, John Carpenter, Robert Mason and John Mason. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/410 (with 7 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9d
Werkworth Thomas yeoman of the great wardrobe under investigation In 1415, William Werkworth indented to serve with five other men, all described as yeomen of the great wardrobe, Roger Holbeth, William Curson, John Boston, Thomas White and Hugh Skynnier. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 (with 5 others)
Werwik William Armourer under investigation In 1415, William Werwik indented to serve with eleven other men who were also responsible for looking after the royal armour, Sanon Albryrht, Deryck van Holt, Dederick Reynold, Nicholas Dederick, John Fletcher, Nicholas de Hongery, Long Deryck, Robert Symond, Lowys Fox, William Butte, Laurence Herforthshire and Nicholas Brampton. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/437 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 10d
West John archer under investigation In 1415, John West indented to serve with 7 other esquires, Griffin Percevale, William Smythson, John Benyfeld, Roger Shermay, Thomas Berton, Nicholas Sanle and Matthew Bowre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/69/4/380 (with 7 others); TNA E404/31/320; TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
West Thomas Knight There are some problems in definite indentification here. A Thomas West inherited his estates from his father, also called Thomas, upon the latter’s death in 1415. On 26 May 1416, he was appointed as one of the commissioners of array for the counties of Southampton (Hampshire), Wiltshire and Dorset. He served on the campaign of 1416 to rescue Harfleur, with 29 men-at-arms and 60 archers, and was also on later campaigns in Normandy. But a Sir Thomas West of Oakhanger, Newton Valence and Winkton, Hampshire, Hinton Martell, Dorset, and Blatchington, Sussex, son of Joan, sister and heir of Thomas, lord de la Warre, made a will on 1 August 1415and is believed to have died on 30 September. This Sir Thomas’s brother was Reynold West who served in Henry V’s conquest of Normandy and was summoned to parliament as Lord de la Warre from 1427 to his death in 1450. In 1415, Thomas West indented to serve with one other knight, 19 men-at-arms and 60 archers. If he is the man who died on 30 September 1415 it is possible he died as a result of sickness at the siege. In the absence of evidence to the contrary, however, it seem that he and his retinue were at the battle. 81 TNA C 76/98 m. 17, 20; TNA E101/69/5/433; TNA E404/31/199, 229; TNA E101/45/5 m4; m.7d; Ag Roll
Westerdale Thomas Labourer under investigation In 1415, Thomas Westerdale indented to serve with fifteen other labourers, all described as labourers of the scullery, Philip Norman, William Nightyngale, John Norman, Thomas de Kent, John Cordwener, Geoffrey Fletcher, Thomas Blaby, John Newman, Thomas Waleys, Ralph Passin, Thomas Goldsmyth, John Lenkenore, John Bentham, John Perott and Thomas Blakman. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 16 TNA E404/31/408 (with 15 others)
Westwode John Carpenter under investigation In 1415, John Westwode indented to serve with five other men, all described as carpenters of the hall, William Carpenter, William Batte, John Wyke, John Bole and Thomas Kent. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/390 (with 5 others)
Whappelode Thomas yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Thomas Whappelode indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Wheller Thomas wheelwright under investigation In 1415, Thomas Wheller indented to serve with five other archers, all wheelwrights in the royal household, John Flete, Robert Lety, Walter Wheller, John Blakeman and Thomas Leycestre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
Wheller Walter wheelwright under investigation In 1415, Walter Wheller indented to serve with five other archers, all wheelwrights in the royal household, John Flete, Robert Lety, Thomas Wheller, John Blakeman and Thomas Leycestre. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/347 (with 5 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 7d
White Thomas yeoman of the wardrobe under investigation In 1415, Thomas White indented to serve with five other men, all described as yeomen of the great wardrobe, Roger Holbeth, William Curson, John Boston, Thomas Werkworth and Hugh Skynnier. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E101/45/5 m. 10 (with 5 others)
Whitingham Alan Esquire under investigation In 1415, Adam Whittingham indented to serve with four other Lancashire esquires; Thurstan Anderton, William Orell, Henry Pemberton and Henry Blundell. In the event, they served with 12 archers. One of their number, Adam Whittingham, fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England but the remainder fought at the battle surviving to be shipped home from Calais with 6 horses TNA C76/98 m. 19; TNA E101/69/6/477 (with 4 others); E101/45/5; TNA E358/6 rot 1d
Whitingham Adam Esquire under investigation In 1415, Adam Whittingham indented to serve with another man at arms, Henry Blundell, with each man providing 3 archers. He appears to have been invalided home, but it is not clear what happened to his archers. TNA E101/69/4/408 (with Henry Blundell); TNA E404/31/275; TNA E101/45/5 m. 4
Wightman William Esquire A William Wightman was rewarded with two messuages, two shops and other holdings in St. Albans by Henry IV in 1406. The letters patent were renewed in both 1407 and 1408, but although the recipient is described in all three documents as a royal servant, and it seems probable that he was the son or even grandson of his namesake, who was MP for Huntingdon, extraordinarily, twenty-one-times between 1361 and 1391 and ‘spigurnel’ (the officer who sealed writs or documents processed by the Chancery) between 1363 and 1394. By 1415, William was a king’s esquire who indented, with 5 others, to provide three archers each. In 1415, William Wightman indented to serve with 5 other king’s esquires, Robert Heton, Robert Lacock, Thomas Lynchbarrow, John Kytner and Richard Parker. Each man provided 3 archers giving a total contribution of 18 archers. These men were ordinarily part of the royal household and entered into their indenture separately from this service. They were clearly with the household between 8 and 20 July as their wages between these dates were deducted from their account. John Kytner was among those who fell ill at Harfleur and was given leave to return to England on 6 October and by the time the accounts were submitted he was described as deceased. The remaining esquires and their archers fought at the battle and returned to England from Calais with 33 horses. TNA E101/69/5/438 (with 5 others); TNA E404/31/296; TNA E101/45/5 m. 1; ; TNA E101/47/36; TNA E358/6 rot 4
Wilcotes Thomas Esquire Thomas Wilcotes was esquire to the king’s consort, Joan queen of England, who was granted the offices of controller and surveyor of the works of her manor and park of Woodstock on 6 September 1411, which was confirmed by Henry IV on 14 February 1412. Elizabeth Blaket built and endowed a chapel, afterwards known as the Wilcotes chapel, in North Leigh parish church, where prayers were to be said for the souls of her sons (Sir Thomas – knighted at some point – and Sir John Wilcotes), who had died in the wars in France, and of her husbands, Wilcotes and Blaket, who, according to the letters patent licensing the foundation, had both long served the kings of England. Elizabeth, who then married Sir Robert Conyers survived until 1445, outliving Blaket’s heir, her stepson Edmund. CPR 1408-1413, pp. 368 In 1415, Thomas Wilcotes’s retinue consisted of himself, another man-at-arms, possibly his younger brother, John, and 6 archers. Thomas was among those who fell ill at Harfleur, together with his man-at-arms and 2 of his archers, all of whom were given leave to return to England and left Harfleur on 26 September. 8 TNA E101/69/4/387; TNA E404/31/373; TNA E101/45/5 m. 7; TNA E101/46/34; TNA E358/6 rot. 2s
William John yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, John William indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, Thomas Wodgate, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Willianis Reynold Master gunner under investigation In 1415, Reynold Willianis indented to serve with five other master gunners, Hayne Joy, John Simmondeson, Gerardo Vanwillighen, Henry Van Pruce and Bernardo Van Loon. Reynold Willianis was one of twenty-nine master gunners recruited for the expedition to receive 12d per day, each of whom had two assistant gunners who were each paid 6d per day. As the artillery was left behind in Harfleur after its capture he was not present at the battle and did not serve in the garrison of the town. TNA E101/69/8/514; TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Willoughby Robert, lord baron Of Eresby, Lincolnshire, Robert (1385-1452) succeeded his father, William, as lord Willoughby in 1409. His first recorded military service was with Thomas, Duke of Clarence in France in 1412. In 1416, he was made a Knight of the Garter and developed an active military career in France which lasted until 1438. He was buried at Mettingham in Suffolk at the college of Canons of which he was patron. His tomb is now lost. Willoughby indented to provide a retinue of 90 men, consisting of himself, 2 knights, 27 men-at-arms and 60 archers. Of these, post-campaign accounts suggest that 6 men-at-arms, together with Willoughby’s chaplain, 16 archers and 4 pages were invalided home from Harfleur. Another financial record says that only 5 men-at-arms were invalided home but that one died at Harfleur. Shipping was provided for 90 men with 178 horses. Therefore it is unclear whether Willoughby had been able to keep his retinue up to strength and therefore had 90 men at the battle. The evidence of losses might sugges that he fought there with an 84 strong company of himself, 2 knights, 21 men-at-arms and 60 archers. Three French prisoners were taken by his men at the battle, worth total ransoms of £76.13.4. 90 TNA C76/98 m. 15; TNA E404/31/183; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3; TNA E101/44/30 no. 1 m. 12; TNA E101/46/33; E358/6 rot 10d
Wobury John Chaplain under investigation In 1415, John Wobury indented to serve with thirty other clerics, Edmund Lacy, Stephen Morpath, John Seward, Thomas Kyllum, Thomas Dainet, Thomas Gyles, John Prentys, John Arondell, John Burell, John Cook, Thomas Walver, Nicholas Storgeon, William Caue, John Hereford, Alan Hert, John Bortherton, William Bountenips, John Hunte, Nicholas Peynton, Richard Blythe, Robert Lwer, Alayn Kyrketon, John Chamberlain, John Kyngman, Stephen Peynton, John Sewy, Thomas Batronive, Thomas Manfeld, John Couper and John Coll. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/444 (with 30 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 11
Wodecok John yeoman messenger under investigation In 1415, John Wodecok indented to serve with three other men, described as yeomen messagers of the king’s chamber, William Herryot, John Samuon and John Herforth. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/412 (with 3 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 9
Wodgate Thomas yeoman of the pavilions under investigation In 1415, Thomas Wodgate indented to serve with twenty-nine other men, described as being yeomen of the king’s pavilions, John Couyn, John Ewell, Robert Constantyne, John Bodrygge, Thomas Whappelode, John William, Thomas Geddefere, William Loker, John Lovve, Thomas Veyse, Robert Herde, Robert Chartur, Piers Saye, John Kikevy, William Walche, William Fance, Thomas Olyner, Nicholas Snaythe, John Browne, Roger Tyndesley, John Butter, John Glasyer, Richard Mordon, David Reynold, Adam Jordan, John Smyth, William Couper and Richard Kirkeham In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/416 (with 29 others)
Wolde William Esquire under investigation In 1415, William Wolde indented to serve with 4 other esquires, Henry Bromley, John Clynk, Nicholas Horton and John Louthe who together provided 11 archers. John Louthe and William Wolde remained in Harfleur as members of the garrison with 3 archers. Clynk, Bromley and Horton and 8 archers fought at the battle and survived to return to England from Calais with 11 horses. William Wolde, however, was placed in the garrison of Harfleur and played no part in the battle. E101/69/3/369 (with 4 others); TNA E404/31/352; TNA E358/6 rot 6 (with 4 others);
Workesley Jordan archer under investigation In 1415, John Workesley indented to serve with twenty-five other archers, William Malbon, Robert Clidrowe, William Somercotes, William Kerby, Robert Couper, Thomas Porter, John Burnham, John Akeland, William Mynour, Owain Cawardyn, David Cawardyn, Charles Holand, Adam Eggesley, William Albertyn, John Ruse, William Gamesley, William Custance, Robert Sandbach, William Sadelere, John Bromley, John Clerkeson, John Perkyn, John Lye, Roger Assent and John Barbour. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/330 (with 25 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6
Wryght John cordwainer (shoemaker) under investigation In 1415, John Wryght indented to serve with twenty-four other cordwainers, George Benet, John Kenyngion, Thomas Lancastre, Thomas Caninbrigge, Hugh Benge, John Lamberhosse, William Bekouyll, John Man, Esmon Lesyngham, John Smyth, Richard Goldebone, William Balderton, William Newmestre, John Delyngham, John Batyn, John Agase, John Sprotte, John Ely, John Ewayn, Richard Pole, Thomas Fawconer, Robert Chamberlain, William Chamberlain and William Blakebury. One of these men was retinue was placed in the garrison of Harfleur while 8 fell ill there and were therefore given leave to return to England. Gregory and the remaining 14 men fought at the battle where one of his company took a prisoner named ‘de Vylours’. All survived and returned to England from Calais with a horse. TNA E404/31/409 (with 24 others)
Wyke John Carpenter under investigation In 1415, John Wyke indented to serve with five other men, all described as carpenters of the hall, William Carpenter, John Westwode, William Batte, John Bole and Thomas Kent. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/390 (with 5 others)
Wykeham William archer under investigation In 1415, William Wykeham indented to serve with eleven other archers, John Lynchelade, John Yaroughdale, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, William Petham, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. 12 TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Wylde William Labourer under investigation In 1415, William Wylde indented to serve with nineteen other men, all described as labourers of the hall, Thomas Fysshe, William Lynton, John Carters, Richard Purser, Thomas Trygg, Robert Golcok, William Pak, John Martin, Richard atte Lee, Thomas May, John Squyer, Thomas Cumpton, Richard Buckelee, John atte Hille, William Clement, Thomas atte Mille, Richard Forfoye, William Herbelot and Piers Bakers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/391 (with 19 others)
Yaroughdale John archer under investigation In 1415, John Yaroughdale indented to serve with eleven other archers, William Wykeham, John Lynchelade, Stephen Frenssh, Laurence Comube, Thomas Walsh, Oliver Shorthale, Richard Castell, William Petham, Thomas Holme, Walter Kendale and John Stok. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were present at the battle. TNA E404/31/326 (with 11 others); TNA E101/45/5 m. 6;
Yedelissh John Knight This man has not yet been identified securely. It is possible that he is a Knight from the Low Countries who also served with two archers on the 1416 campaign to rescue Harfleur, although there the spelling is Zedlich and the first name is given as Georg, with ‘Here George’ being the appellation at one point In 1415, John Yedelissh indented to serve with one man-at-arms and six archers. It seems that all were at the battle. 8 TNA E101/69/5/413; TNA E404/31/335; TNA E101/45/5 m.5
York Edward, duke of duke Edward, Duke of York (1373-1415) had been close to Richard II and had benefited from this, being awarded the title of Duke of Aumale having earlier been made earl of Rutland (1390) and earl of Cork (1394). Following the usurpation of Henry IV, Edward was stripped of the Aumale title of Duke of Aumale, but was rewarded with the custody of the Isle of Wight and the Channel Islands whose strategic significance demonstrated the new king’s trust in him. Edward succeeded to the title of Duke of York following the death of his father in 1402 andwas acrive in the Welsh wars, also serving on the 1412 campaign to France with Thomas, Duke of Clarence. The duke made his will at the siege of Harfleur on 17 August. At the battle, he commanded the right wing of the English army. His bones were brought back to England and interred, as he had wished, under the step to the choir in the church of Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, where he had established a college of priests. The present monument was erected on the orders of Queen Elizabeth I. Edward duke of York indented for the service of 400 men, himself, a baron (William, Lord Lovell), three knights, 95 men-at-arms and 300 archers. Of these two men-at-arms and 7 archers were put into the garrison of Harfleur. At the battle the duke served in person with Lovell, three knights, 75 men-at-arms and 294 archers. He died at the battle. We know that shipping was provided for Lovell, 3 knights and 279 men-at-arms and archers with 329 horses. This suggests that York had lost 108 of his men at the battle where he himself was killed. we have musters for his retinue at the point of embarkation and, uniquely, at thee point the army left Harfleur. 400 TNA C76/98 m. 12, 22, 20; TNA E101/69/4/389; TNA E404/31/184; TNA E101/45/5 m. 3; TNA E101/45/22 m 3; TNA E101/45/2(first qtr), 45/19 (second quarter); TNA E101/47/40; E358/6 rot. 3d
Zouche William, lord baron The fourth Baron Zouche of Harringworth (c.1373–1415), was a member of Henry IV’s council. He negotiated with Glyn D?r in 1402 and performed escort duties for Blanche of Lancaster and Joan of Navarre. Early in Henry V’s reign he briefly held the lieutenancy of Calais but his last official act was as one of the peers commissioned to judge the rebels after the Southampton plot in 1415. He died on 3 November 1415 and was succeeded by his eldest son, William (d. 1462), then still a minor. Zouche’s retinue in 1415 consisted of himself, 2 knights, 17 men-at-arms and 40 archers. In the absence of evidence to the contrary we can assume they were all at the battle, but as William himself died on 2 November it is possible this was as a result of injury, or indeed that he had already come home after the siege. 60 TNA E404/31/351; TNA E101/45/5 m. 5; TNA E101/45/20 m. 38